• particulates
  • For example, forest fires produce air toxics, such as particulates and volatile organic compounds. (ct.gov)
  • Medical Xpress) -- A study by the University of Otago, Wellington has found that smoking on city street footpaths increases the amount of dangerous fine particulates in city air. (medicalxpress.com)
  • They found that when smokers were observed, at an average distance of 2.6 metres, there was an average 70% more fine particulates in the air (PM2.5 or less than 2.5mm in diameter) than when there were no smokers around. (medicalxpress.com)
  • 1990
  • Major sources of air toxics are stationary sources that emit or have the potential to emit 10 tons or more per year of any one of the 188 air toxics listed in the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (Act), or 25 tons or more per year of combined air toxics. (ct.gov)
  • In 1990, the EPA estimated that major sources emit 30% of all man-made air toxic emissions in the United States. (ct.gov)
  • Despite great gains in fuel economy and the efficacy of air pollution control equipment over the past twenty years, the EPA estimated in 1990 that mobile sources emit 39% of all man-made air toxic emissions in the United States. (ct.gov)
  • State Average Annual Emissions Trend (1 pg, 2 MB) Criteria pollutants State Tier 1 for 1990 - 2016. (epa.gov)
  • The EPA established the NAAQS according to Sections 108 and 109 of the U.S. Clean Air Act, which was last amended in 1990. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1990, a Lead Staff Paper was prepared by the EPA's Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards (OPQPS), which was based on information presented in the 1986 Lead/AQCD/Addendum and 1990 Supplement, in addition to other OAQPS sponsored lead exposure/risk analyses. (wikipedia.org)
  • The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments direct EPA to set standards for all major sources of air toxics (and some area sources that are of particular concern). (wikipedia.org)
  • toxic
  • There are many sources of toxic air pollutants in Connecticut. (ct.gov)
  • Area sources of air toxics are stationary sources smaller than major sources, which emit less than 10 tons per year of any single air toxic or less than 25 tons per year of combined air toxics. (ct.gov)
  • Mobile sources emit toxic air pollutants through the incomplete combustion of fuel and through the evaporation of fuel. (ct.gov)
  • However, estimates based on 1999 information indicate that 64% of toxic air pollutant emissions originate from mobile sources, 38% from on-road and 26 % from non-road. (ct.gov)
  • These sources may release air toxics from equipment leaks, when materials are transferred from one location to another, or during discharge through emission stacks or vents "Area" sources consist of smaller-size facilities that release lesser quantities of toxic pollutants into the air. (wikipedia.org)
  • Area sources are defined as sources that do not emit more than 10 tons per year of a single air toxic or more than 25 tons per year of a combination of air toxics. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pollutant Release and Transfer Registers (PRTR) are systems to collect and disseminate information on environmental releases and transfers of toxic chemicals from industrial and other facilities. (wikipedia.org)
  • Of the releases to air by the pulp and paper industry, 60% were methanol which is not a persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic (PBT) chemical and is not a carcinogen. (wikipedia.org)
  • SLCPs
  • KATHMANDU -- The Himalayan countries of Nepal and Bhutan will, in 2013, have two permanent air monitoring observatories set up by the International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD) as part of a programme to reduce black carbon and other short-lived climate-forcing pollutants (SLCPs). (environmental-expert.com)
  • The Climate and Clean Air Coalition, launched by the United Nations Environment Programme in 2011 to reduce SLCPs, has now grown to 33 member-countries. (environmental-expert.com)
  • Short-lived climate pollutants (SLCPs) are agents that have relatively short lifetime in the atmosphere - a few days to a few decades - and a warming influence on climate. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1970
  • The latest version of the 1970 - 2016 data show the trends for Tier 1 categories which distinguish pollutant emission contributions among major source types. (epa.gov)
  • These standards are authorized by Section 112 of the 1970 Clean Air Act and the regulations are published in 40 CFR Parts 61 and 63. (wikipedia.org)
  • Congress passed the 1970 Clean Air Act to ensure that the general public was protected from harmful levels of criteria pollutants, established by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). (wikipedia.org)
  • originate
  • Sources: USEPA's original list & Modifications Most air toxics originate from human-made sources, including mobile sources (e.g., cars, trucks, buses) and stationary sources (e.g., factories, refineries, power plants), as well as indoor sources (e.g., building materials and activities such as cleaning). (wikipedia.org)
  • heavy metals
  • Indeed, Hajrudin Pasic, Khairul Alam and David Bayless recently patented a new type of membranewoven from carbon, silicon and other fibers and measuring only one to three millimeters thickthat captures fine air pollutants and heavy metals more cheaply and efficiently than conventional filters. (scientificamerican.com)
  • emit
  • These sources emit air toxics through various means, including emissions stacks and vents, fugitive process emissions, equipment leaks, material transfer and handling, or accidental releases. (ct.gov)
  • Design for disposal or reuse: The end-of-life of a product is very important, because some products emit dangerous chemicals into the air, ground and water after they are disposed of in a landfill. (wikipedia.org)
  • gases
  • The Convenient and Economical ALL-IN-ONE Instrument provides the latest in Indoor Air Quality Monitoring & Real-time Data Logging for IAQ analysis in Homes, Schools, Offices, & much more The AQ Comfort Includes: Innovative IAQ Tool for HVAC Professionals Provide your own "Comfort" Audit Measures CO2 & CO Gases Monitors: Temp, % RH, Dew Point, Wet Bulb REAL-TIME DATALOGGING Compact, Handheld. (environmental-expert.com)
  • Their biggest disadvantages are that they are not capable of removing submicrometer partculates and they do not efficiently absorb most pollutant gases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ozone
  • Ozone (O3): Ozone found on the surface-level, also known as tropospheric ozone is also regulated by the NAAQS under the Clean Air Act. (wikipedia.org)
  • indoors
  • The objective was to measure the air quality outside and inside the combined showroom and workshop, demonstrating the importance of measuring common traffic-related pollutants indoors as well as outdoors. (environmental-expert.com)
  • Since most people spend more time indoors than outdoors, exposure to indoor air pollutants is an important environmental hazard. (tamu.edu)
  • substance
  • A pollutant is a substance or energy introduced into the environment that has undesired effects, or adversely affects the usefulness of a resource. (wikipedia.org)
  • concern
  • It is a fact that indoor air is, in many cases, a more grievous concern than outdoor air. (environmental-expert.com)
  • Given climate change, changes in wind speed are currently a potential concern for society, due to their impacts on a wide array of spheres, such as wind power generation, ecohydrological implications for agriculture and hydrology, wind-related hazards and catastrophes, or air quality and human health, among many others. (wikipedia.org)
  • however, they are rarely chosen when gaseous pollutant removal is the only concern. (wikipedia.org)
  • streams
  • One of the major mechanisms for implementing this statute was to create a permitting process for all discharging methods that involved dumping pollutants into streams, lakes, rivers, wetlands, or creeks. (wikipedia.org)
  • They use the features of both the dry cyclone and the spray chamber to remove pollutants from gas streams. (wikipedia.org)
  • Carbon
  • Fund pollutants do not cause damage to the environment unless the emission rate exceeds the receiving environment's absorptive capacity (e.g. carbon dioxide, which is absorbed by plants and oceans). (wikipedia.org)
  • cause
  • However, reduced airflow in a building can cause air quality problems in three ways. (tamu.edu)
  • Reduced amounts of outside air entering a building can cause the levels of air pollutants to build up over time and become greater than outdoor levels of air pollution. (tamu.edu)
  • WKC Supports the Musangu Foundation with Specialist Air Quality Monitoring Services Last month, London-based Principal Consultant Barry Roberts took some time to apply his air quality monitoring expertise to a charitable cause, supporting the work undertaken by the Musangu Foundation. (environmental-expert.com)
  • A pollutant may cause long- or short-term damage by changing the growth rate of plant or animal species, or by interfering with human amenities, comfort, health, or property values. (wikipedia.org)
  • Local pollutants cause damage near the emission source. (wikipedia.org)
  • Regional pollutants cause damage further from the emission source. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many of the Chinese citizens started to wonder if air pollution is the cause of the increase of lung cancer. (wikipedia.org)
  • quality
  • However, it doesn't mean we are safe from poor indoor air quality at home. (environmental-expert.com)
  • Poor air quality has been linked to health effects in everyone, especially infants, children, seniors and pets. (environmental-expert.com)
  • The EPA has put indoor air quality on its top five concerns for our overall health. (environmental-expert.com)
  • What is Indoor Air Quality? (environmental-expert.com)
  • Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) refers to the degree of air purity inside buildings that constitute the usual environment in which people carry out activities (offices, homes, schools, shopping and leisure centres, etc. (environmental-expert.com)
  • With the quality of indoor air ranking highly in our lives, this second, completely, revised edition now includes 12 completely new chapters addressing both chemical and analytical aspects of organic pollutants. (ebooks.com)
  • This book is divided into four clearly defined parts: measuring organic indoor pollutants, investigation concepts and quality guidelines, field studies, and emission studies. (ebooks.com)
  • In 1977, the EPA published a document which detailed the Air Quality Criteria for lead. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is an 'unprecedented campaign' for a city with no currently functioning air quality monitoring station, Maheswar Rupakheti, group leader for SusKat at IASS Potsdam, told SciDev.Net. (environmental-expert.com)
  • Today (December 10, 2017), OPSIS` President Svante Wallin is delivering a presentation at the Clean Air Forum in Abu Dhabi, on the importance of continuous air quality monitoring, challenges and solutions, and presenting some of OPSIS monitoring projects in the region. (environmental-expert.com)
  • During two days, starting today, Environment Agency - Abu Dhabi and the Department of Economic Development - Abu Dhabi host the forum that aims "to improve the air quality in the country by promoting strategies and programmes that encourage. (environmental-expert.com)
  • However, it is worth noting that although emissions within the EU have fallen significantly, air quality can still be quite low, particularly in urban areas. (ecnmag.com)
  • The five week long study by public health researchers used a sensitive air monitor to measure air quality in the Lower Hutt shopping centre as they passed 284 people who were smoking on the footpaths. (medicalxpress.com)
  • In other words, industrial air pollution sources located at altitudes well above sea level must comply with significantly more stringent air quality standards than sources located at sea level (since it is more difficult to comply with lower standards). (wikipedia.org)
  • Air-Quality.org.uk. (wikipedia.org)
  • Regulations
  • Pollutants can cross international borders and therefore international regulations are needed for their control. (wikipedia.org)
  • The rise in global environmental issues such as air and water pollution, climate change, overflowing landfills and clearcutting have all lead to increased government regulations. (wikipedia.org)
  • sources
  • Estimates from 1999 show that approximately 30% of air toxics are emitted from area sources. (ct.gov)
  • Natural sources of air toxics are diverse and numerous. (ct.gov)
  • Sources of indoor air pollutants, measurement and detection as well as evaluation are covered filling the gap in the literature caused by this topical subject. (ebooks.com)
  • The authors cover physico-chemical fundamentals of organic pollutants, relevant definitions and terminology, emission sources, sampling techniques and instrumentation, exposure assessment as well as methods for control. (ebooks.com)
  • The EPA concentrated on regulatory and remedial clean-up efforts to minimize Pb exposure from numerous non-air sources that caused more severe public health risks, and undertook actions to reduce air emissions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Large proportions of certain pollutants come from so-called 'diffuse' sources, which are typically emitted over large areas from often indistinct sources. (ecnmag.com)
  • Some governmental regulatory jurisdictions require industrial sources of air pollution to comply with sea level standards corrected for altitude. (wikipedia.org)
  • Such factors facilitate estimation of emissions from various sources of air pollution. (wikipedia.org)
  • greenhouse
  • There is now a trend towards sustainability in the pulp and paper industry as it moves to reduce clear cutting, water use, greenhouse gas emissions, fossil fuel consumption and clean up its impacts on local water supplies and air pollution. (wikipedia.org)
  • NAAQS
  • and (5) to periodically review and revise, as appropriate, the criteria and NAAQS for a given listed pollutant or class of pollutants. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lead (Pb): In the mid-1970s, lead was listed as a criteria air pollutant that required NAAQS regulation. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Clean Air Act requires periodic review of NAAQS, and new scientific data published after 1977 made it necessary to revise the standards previously established in the 1977 Lead AQCD document. (wikipedia.org)