• rinderpest
  • 25 June 2011, Rome - Flanked by Presidents, Vice-Presidents, Ministers and other international dignitaries, FAO Director-General Jacques Diouf today unveiled a commemorative plaque to celebrate global freedom from rinderpest, or cattle plague, one of history's deadliest animal diseases and a long-time threat to human livelihoods and food security. (fao.org)
  • The disease has not been seen in Europe since the early 1900s, but rinderpest remained a serious problem in sub-Saharan Africa and southern Asia until the late 1990s. (fwi.co.uk)
  • When rinderpest was introduced into sub-Saharan Africa at the end of the 19th century it killed off 80-90% of all cattle in the region. (fwi.co.uk)
  • So far, rinderpest is only the second viral disease after smallpox to have been successfully wiped off the face of the Earth. (iaea.org)
  • Walter Plowright, the British veterinarian often called one of the 'heroes of the 20th century' because of the massive increase in meat and dairy products resulting from his invention of a vaccine that has almost totally eliminated the cattle disease rinderpest, died recently in London. (vaccinenewsdaily.com)
  • Most Americans have probably never heard of rinderpest, a virus in the same family as measles that causes one of the most lethal diseases in cattle. (vaccinenewsdaily.com)
  • livestock
  • You'll find the net's best cattle news, free livestock classified ads, free ranch listing, the latest USDA livestock market report, free ranch email, Baxter Black, thousands of links and a free newsletter just for ranchers. (cattletoday.info)
  • outbreak
  • The initial outbreak in July led to concerns that the disease that could affect market access for New Zealand's diary products, but led only to a brief dip in the New Zealand dollar. (reuters.com)
  • OVER FOURTY cattle have died in Sinazongwe district in the last seven days due to the outbreak of babesiosis disease, district commissioner Protacio Mulenga has confirmed. (co.zm)
  • And the district administration in Sinazongwe has banned the crossing and selling of cattle following reports of the outbreak of the disease. (co.zm)
  • The suspected outbreak has greatly affected the livelihoods of most of our people as you know that the wealth and agricultural productivity of people is cattle. (co.zm)
  • I would also like to take this opportunity to appeal to Zambeef here in Sinazongwe to stop buying cattle from Mweemba chiefdom so that we contain the outbreak, "he said. (co.zm)
  • 4.94985 After the outbreak of many cattle diseases between 1995 and 2001 the cattle market was not allowed any more. (wikipedia.org)
  • veterinary
  • On 27 June, chief veterinary officers and other experts from around the world will meet at FAO Headquarters to discuss measures to safeguard remaining samples of virus and vaccines in laboratories, and to assess risks and response requirements in the fight against other high impact diseases. (fao.org)
  • In a paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , Benjamin Dewals of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Liège in Belgium and his team report that they have discovered the gene that enables AlHV-1 infection to progress to MCF, and they have developed a vaccine against the disease. (phys.org)
  • Scientists at the university`s College of Veterinary Medicine have completed initial testing of a new vaccine they say promises to protect cattle from brucellosis without most of the drawbacks of the vaccine currently in use. (chicagotribune.com)
  • And of course it also improves the financial situation of the cattle owners, who are able to minimise losses', explains Jørgen Agerholm, who is also Head of the Section for Veterinary Reproduction and Obstetrics. (eurekalert.org)
  • The veterinary department informed me that approximately 50 cattle have died because of babesiosis, a tick-borne disease," he said. (co.zm)
  • In my veterinary practice of more than twenty years, which has been devoted in large part to cattle, with special reference to the disease of abortion, I have found that in nearly every case of abortion, except such as were caused by a fall, a kick or other absolute violence, the germs of the disease were in both the cow and the foetus. (oldandsold.com)
  • Gary Zimmerman, veterinary researcher in Livingston, MT, says there are several different genera and many species of pathogenic coccidia, but only a few affect cattle. (beefmagazine.com)
  • He made important contributions to veterinary medicine and published, among others, about the natural causes of cattle diseases (Leeuwarden, 1765). (wikipedia.org)
  • species
  • Wildebeests carry asymptomatically alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 (AlHV-1), a γ-herpesvirus inducing malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) to several ruminant species (including cattle). (phys.org)
  • The banteng (/ˈbæntɛŋ/) (Bos javanicus), also known as tembadau, is a species of wild cattle found in Southeast Asia. (wikipedia.org)
  • infectious
  • The purely accidental acts of abortion coming under my care and investigation have been few, and I have used them to establish beyond doubt the contagious or infectious nature of the disease of abortion. (oldandsold.com)
  • This marked the first time that an arthropod had been definitively linked with the transmission of an infectious disease and presaged the eventual discovery of insects as important vectors in a number of diseases (see yellow fever, malaria). (wikipedia.org)
  • nasal
  • When wildebeest enter grazing areas, young wildebeest spread the virus through their nasal secretions, infecting cattle. (phys.org)
  • producers
  • Mississippi State -- Mississippi State University researchers are developing a biological map of how three tiny pathogens cause big losses for cattle producers each year. (cattletoday.com)
  • Some producers think cattle get coccidiosis from birds, but it isn't true," Zimmerman says. (beefmagazine.com)
  • calves
  • In a study among Holstein calves published in the scientific journal BMC Genetics they have discovered a hitherto undescribed disease among animals - a facial deformation they have chosen to call Facial Dysplasia Syndrome. (eurekalert.org)
  • The researchers have discovered the genetic mutation that is the cause of the disease among calves and traced it back to one particular breeding bull. (eurekalert.org)
  • The bull has now been put down to prevent further cases of the disease among new-born calves. (eurekalert.org)
  • After having received information from veterinarians of calves with facial deformations, Jørgen Agerholm went looking for more cases in his network of cattle veterinarians, including on Facebook. (eurekalert.org)
  • This gene was sequenced in the calves' genome, and the researchers were then able to determine that a mutation in this gene had caused the disease among the calves. (eurekalert.org)
  • This means that the calves developed the deformation when the mutation was passed on from either the mother or father and not from both the mother and the father, which is the case with many hereditary diseases. (eurekalert.org)
  • Our aim was always to lower the number of sick and dead calves, as some hereditary diseases are very painful and invalidating. (eurekalert.org)
  • One of the five most economically important cattle diseases in the industry, coccidiosis is a costly parasitic disease, primarily in young calves. (beefmagazine.com)
  • calf
  • While this is the first and most common application of the term, the second, and by far the most important designation, is that of the disease which is the cause of perhaps ninety per cent of "calf slinking. (oldandsold.com)
  • Some would even carry the calf full time, but the germs of the disease would remain in the system of both the cow and the calf, causing trouble later for both. (oldandsold.com)
  • Subscribe to Cow-Calf Weekly for more cattle health information. (beefmagazine.com)
  • pathogens
  • The phenomenon of nonviraemic or nonsystemic transmission turns out to be widespread - it has been subsequently observed with many other viruses transmitted by ticks, black flies and mosquitos, including major human pathogens such as West Nile virus, as well as other pathogens, including the spirochaete Borrelia burgdorferi, which causes Lyme disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • rarely
  • Most of the farmers in this part of Sinazongwe do not have dip tanks and rarely treat their cattle. (co.zm)
  • vaccination
  • The most commonly used clostridial vaccination in cattle is the 7-way type which protects against Clostridium chauveoi (blackleg), Clostridium septicum and Clostridium sordelli (malignant edema), Clostridium novyi (black disease), and three types of Clostridium perfringens (enterotoxemia). (cattletoday.info)
  • For vaccination to work, diagnostic tests had to be developed to identify the location and spread of the disease, which animals were infected, and to monitor the efficiency of the vaccination campaigns. (iaea.org)
  • important
  • Genome sequencing will be even more important to agriculture in the future as it becomes useful for unlocking the mysteries of disease. (cattletoday.com)
  • Ticks
  • This consists of cryopreserved sporozoites from crushed ticks, but it is expensive and can cause disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] Control of the disease relies on control of ticks of domestic animals, particularly disease-resistant ticks. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pesticides (acaricides) are applied in dipping baths or spray races, and cattle breeds with good ability to acquire immune resistance to the vector ticks are used. (wikipedia.org)
  • During this research, Nuttall visited sea-bird colonies and became interested in ticks, arthropods that often infest sea birds as well as other vertebrates, and can act as vectors for disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are various options for controlling ticks of domestic animals, including: topical application of parasiticidal chemicals in dip baths or spray races or pour-on formulations, spraying parasiticides on walls of cattle pens, and rendering the walls of cattle pens smooth with mortar to stop ticks molting there. (wikipedia.org)
  • Selection of cattle for good ability to acquire immune resistance to ticks is potentially effective. (wikipedia.org)
  • commonly
  • Mastitis is commonly caused by poor hygiene in cubicle houses and milking parlours, especially where cattle are forced to lie in damp and dirty conditions. (vegsoc.org)
  • Scientists
  • Scientists at Advanced Cell Technology in Worcester, MA, U.S. extracted DNA from banteng cells kept in the San Diego Zoo's "Frozen Zoo" facility, and transferred it into eggs from domesticated cattle, a process called somatic cell nuclear transfer. (wikipedia.org)
  • causes
  • Infected cattle develop MCF, which causes immune cell production to spin out of control, leading to death within a few weeks. (phys.org)
  • Before it was understood or accepted that abortion is a disease, the act of abortion or prematurely expelling the foetus, was attributed to numberless causes and conditions. (oldandsold.com)
  • animal
  • The UN's Food and Agriculture Organisation says it will be the first time in history that humankind has succeeded in killing off an animal disease. (fwi.co.uk)
  • Research results like these will heighten the animal welfare by limiting the spread of such diseases. (eurekalert.org)
  • Zimbabwe
  • It has been reported that most of the cattle from Zimbabwe enter Zambia at Chief Mweemba's area. (co.zm)
  • spread
  • Two other nearby farms suspected of being affected by the disease were being tested and restrictions have been placed on the movement of animals to prevent any spread, the Ministry of Primary Industries said in a statement. (reuters.com)
  • The disease is spread by close contact between animals and does not pose a food safety risk or any risk to humans. (reuters.com)
  • These prevent the spread of cattle diseases, such as Foot-and-mouth disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • clinical
  • Later on (day 5 to day 10 from the clinical onset), temperature will lower to a normal range (38.0-39.5°C), but the disease will continue to progress, despite a possible apparent clinical improvement (appetite comes back). (wikipedia.org)
  • protect
  • Mr Mulenga has also urged villagers in Sinazongwe and Mweemba chiefdoms to out and protect their cattle from contracting the disease. (co.zm)
  • In May 2010, a vaccine to protect cattle against East Coast fever reportedly had been approved and registered by the governments of Kenya, Malawi and Tanzania. (wikipedia.org)
  • Genetics
  • Thirty embryos were created and sent to Trans Ova Genetics, which implanted the fertilized eggs in domestic cattle. (wikipedia.org)
  • buffalo
  • citation needed] A form of East Coast fever called corridor disease is observed when the organism is transmitted from the African buffalo to cattle. (wikipedia.org)
  • human
  • The human disease thus helped the researchers in the process of identifying the gene mutation. (eurekalert.org)
  • The OTM rule imposed an automatic ban on all older cattle from entering the human food chain. (vegsoc.org)
  • Subject to negative BSE testing, the new system will allow UK cattle born after 31st July 1996 to be slaughtered and sold for human consumption. (vegsoc.org)
  • New legislation states that cattle born before 1 August 1996 cannot be slaughtered for human consumption and consignment of these animals to a fresh meat slaughterhouse will be an offence. (vegsoc.org)