• apnea
  • In some cases the problems are not limited to the jaw but also appear as pain in the neck or in the back of the head (a type of tension headache) or can be neurologically related to the apnea syndrome. (plazaclinic.net)
  • Bruxism can be associated with some mental health and medical disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, dementia, gastroesophageal reflux disorder (GERD), epilepsy, night terrors, sleep-related disorders such as sleep apnea, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). (mayoclinic.org)
  • 6. A person with bruxism may also suffer from sleep apnea. (rochester.edu)
  • People who have bruxism often also have other sleep disorders, such as sleep apnea or snoring. (rochester.edu)
  • disorders
  • In the worst-case scenario, stress can lead to high blood pressure, heart problems, mood disorders and other issues. (wtol.com)
  • however, for patients with disorders such as bruxism, VFRs are prone to rapid breakage and deterioration, especially if the material is PVC, a short chain molecule which breaks down far more quickly than polypropylene, a long chain molecule. (wikipedia.org)
  • occlusal
  • In addition to other occlusal factors, independent variables such as male gender, bruxism, and loss of molar occlusal contact, edge-to-edge relation of incisors, unilateral buccolingual cusp-to-cusp relation, and unemployment have been identified in affecting occlusal wear. (wikipedia.org)
  • abnormal
  • Although the cause of bruxism is still not well understood, Jankovic said, it's thought to be due to abnormal signals coming from the brain that cause involuntary and forceful contractions of the jaw muscles. (upi.com)
  • Botox
  • A neurology medicine group at Baylor University School of Medicine, as mentioned earlier, reported in a paper published in 2000 that they had treated 18 patients of persistent bruxism by injecting 25 to 100 units of Botox into the affected jaw muscles and, as a result, observed significant effects in all the patients. (plazaclinic.net)
  • Botox can be used to treat people with severe and moderately severe cases of bruxism, Jankovic said. (upi.com)
  • Larger trials aren't planned, and Allergan has not decided whether to apply for FDA approval for using Botox for bruxism, according to Jankovic. (upi.com)
  • dental
  • Conventional treatment techniques include wearing devices that prevent bruxism (e.g. a mouthpiece) and dental techniques such as orthodontics. (plazaclinic.net)
  • Nighttime and daytime bruxism is a very common condition that can cause headaches, temporomandibular joint (TMJ) syndrome and dental problems that can lead to disability and adversely impact quality of life," said the study's senior researcher, Dr. Joseph Jankovic. (upi.com)
  • The central question, Raphael said, is whether bruxism should be treated when it's not typically associated with dental problems. (upi.com)
  • Dentists check for signs of bruxism during dental exams. (dentalinsurance.com)
  • Dental history included uncooperative behavior with the dentist, toothbrushing once a day by the mother, and severe bruxism during the day and night. (aappublications.org)
  • The aetiology of dental abrasion can be due to a single stimuli or, as in most cases, multi-factorial. (wikipedia.org)
  • susceptible
  • The under maturation of the enamel causes the tooth structure to be softer, and more susceptible to the effects of bruxism due to abnormalities in skeletal development. (wikipedia.org)
  • cause
  • This can cause difficulty in both personal and professional contexts, and in some cases may cause patients to withdraw from social situations. (wikipedia.org)
  • Further, brushing for extended periods of time (exceeding 2-3 min) in some cases, when combined with medium/hard bristled toothbrushes can cause abrasive lesions. (wikipedia.org)
  • damage
  • in extreme cases, it may result in bodily harm or property damage by running about or hitting walls. (wikipedia.org)
  • treatment
  • 5. A bruxism treatment device according to claim 1 wherein at least one of said top and bottom surfaces of each of said pads has a plurality of resiliently deformable projections extending from said surface. (patentsencyclopedia.com)
  • 6. A bruxism treatment device according to claim 5 wherein said projections extend from both of said top and bottom surfaces. (patentsencyclopedia.com)
  • 7. A bruxism treatment device according to claim 5 wherein said projections define a pattern of spaced apart ribs. (patentsencyclopedia.com)
  • 8. A bruxism treatment device according to claim 7 wherein said ribs are generally parallel and oriented in a said front-to-rear direction. (patentsencyclopedia.com)
  • 9. A bruxism treatment device according to claim 7 wherein said ribs extend generally transversely of said front-to-rear direction. (patentsencyclopedia.com)
  • 11. A bruxism treatment device according to claim 7 wherein said ribs define concentric circles. (patentsencyclopedia.com)
  • 12. A bruxism treatment according to claim 5 wherein said projections are resiliently bendable. (patentsencyclopedia.com)
  • 13. A bruxism treatment device according to claim 1 wherein each of said pads includes on at least one of its top and bottom surface a pattern of dimples. (patentsencyclopedia.com)
  • 16. A bruxism treatment device according to claim 1 wherein each of said pads has length in said front-to-rear direction of said band of about 15-30 mm and width of about 8-12 mm in a direction generally perpendicular to said front-to-rear direction. (patentsencyclopedia.com)
  • 17. A bruxism treatment device according to claim 1 wherein each of said pads defines spaced-apart ribs extending transversely of said front-to-rear direction, where each of said pads in vertical cross-section defines a wave pattern. (patentsencyclopedia.com)
  • 8. One treatment for bruxism is a mouth guard. (rochester.edu)
  • Independently of the method used, parental education is useful in the case of young nail biters to maximize the efficacy of the treatment programs, as some behaviors by the parents or other family members may be helping to perpetuate the problem. (wikipedia.org)
  • causes
  • Doctors don't completely understand what causes bruxism, but it may be due to a combination of physical, psychological and genetic factors. (mayoclinic.org)
  • condition
  • In 90% of cases, there is a torus on both the left and right sides, making this finding a predominantly bilateral condition. (wikipedia.org)
  • pain
  • In some cases, jaw pain is accompanied by pain in the sides of the head, or temples. (livestrong.com)
  • In most cases, trigeminal neuralgia-related pain lasts anywhere from several seconds to a couple of minutes. (livestrong.com)
  • The participants were chosen because they reported facial pain and bruxism, but it's not clear whether they suffered from bruxism or were told they had it, Raphael said. (upi.com)
  • mouth
  • The size of the tori may fluctuate throughout life, and in some cases the tori can be large enough to touch each other in the midline of mouth. (wikipedia.org)
  • risk
  • Having a personality type that's aggressive, competitive or hyperactive can increase your risk of bruxism. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Smoking tobacco, drinking caffeinated beverages or alcohol, or using recreational drugs may increase the risk of bruxism. (mayoclinic.org)