• Mild
  • Mild disease usually responds to NSAIDs and anti-malarial drugs, while more aggressive disease that involves major organs may need immune suppressants and corticosteroid treatment. (newsmax.com)
  • Mild cases involving just the lower lip may not be noticed at birth. (drugs.com)
  • Mild to moderate glabella rhytids and Periocular rhytids by a measurement of 3 or more upon evaluation using the Rao-Goldman 5-point Facial Wrinkle Scale. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Canine coronavirus is a gastrointestinal disease that is usually asymptomatic or with mild clinical signs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mild cases of hemifacial spasm may be managed with sedation or carbamazepine (an anticonvulsant drug). (wikipedia.org)
  • Idiopathic
  • There appears to be an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance in these families with low penetrance, and except for a younger age at onset, the clinical features overlap with the idiopathic cases.Evaluation of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in genes related to vascular change causing compression of blood vessles did not show an association with hemifacial spasm. (wikipedia.org)
  • Occurs
  • Early disseminated disease occurs days to months after the tick bite and may be the first manifestation of B. burgdorferi infection, without preceding erythema migrans. (integrativepractitioner.com)
  • Rocky Mountain spotted fever* is a rickettsial disease that occurs in dogs and humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • Brain
  • Brain and Nerve. (wikipedia.org)
  • In acquired facial palsy, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), with and without contrast, is helpful to look at brain stem, pons, the cerebellopontine angle and the internal auditory canal. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • From the brain stem, the motor and sensory parts of the facial nerve join together and traverse the posterior cranial fossa before entering the petrous temporal bone via the internal auditory meatus. (wikipedia.org)
  • There is postulation that the genetic changes may lead to an abnormality in the brain region, evidence for this postulation is that the areas of the brain that control facial expression and urination are in close proximity of each other. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although the most frequent cause is a blood vessel pressing on the facial nerve at the spot where it leaves the patient's brain stem, sometimes there is no known cause. (wikipedia.org)
  • compression
  • The bulk of the imaging literature of this disorder concerns the identification of nerve root enlargement, often massive, within the lumbosacral spine in patients with nerve compression syndromes ( 2 - 5 ). (ajnr.org)
  • Otitis media is an infection in the middle ear, which can spread to the facial nerve and inflame it, causing compression of the nerve in its canal. (wikipedia.org)
  • Polyneuropathy is caused by stretching or compression of nerves near bone by xanthomas, which are lipid deposits. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is generally accepted as compression of the facial nerve by vessels of the posterior circulation. (wikipedia.org)
  • approximately 10
  • In the United States, sarcoidosis has a prevalence of approximately 10 cases per 100,000 whites and 36 cases per 100,000 blacks. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sarcoidosis: The lungs, skin, and lymph nodes are most often affected, but the salivary glands are involved in approximately 10% of cases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Trochlear
  • Moreover, while the abducens and the trochlear nerve each innervate one specific muscle, the oculomotor nerve has many functions including eyelid retraction and pupil constriction. (wikipedia.org)
  • In this case voluntary activation of the trochlear nerve (eye depression + eye abduction) is involuntarily activating a branch of the oculomotor nerve responsible for eyelid retraction. (wikipedia.org)
  • Abducens
  • This is an interaction between the abducens nerve and a branch of the oculomotor nerve. (wikipedia.org)
  • Voluntary activation of the abducens nerve (eye abduction) causes involuntary activation of the oculomotor nerve (eye adduction and eyelid elevation). (wikipedia.org)
  • On attempted abduction, the eye's unreactive pupil constricts Another interaction, yet different, is between eye abduction (abducens nerve) and pupil constriction (the oculomotor nerve). (wikipedia.org)
  • cause
  • Other signs may be linked to the cause of the paralysis, such as vesicles in the ear, which may occur if the facial palsy is due to shingles. (wikipedia.org)
  • Canine herpesvirus is an infectious disease that is a common cause of death in puppies less than three weeks old. (wikipedia.org)
  • Canine minute virus is an infectious disease that can cause respiratory and gastrointestinal signs in young puppies. (wikipedia.org)
  • The cause of the disease was determined in 1884 by Antonio Carle and Giorgio Rattone at the University of Turin, with a vaccine being developed in 1924. (wikipedia.org)
  • Treatment depends on the cause, but is largely conservative with facial retraining or mime therapy, if needed, while Botox and surgery are used as last resort. (wikipedia.org)
  • Corneal ulcers are extremely painful due to nerve exposure, and can cause tearing, squinting, and vision loss of the eye. (wikipedia.org)
  • Immune-mediated eye disease can cause ulcers at the border of the cornea and sclera. (wikipedia.org)
  • Early detection is vital for establishing a better prognosis as urinary related problems associated with this disease can cause harm if left untreated. (wikipedia.org)
  • Children with the syndrome have abnormal facial development that cause an inverted smile, nerve connections are however normal. (wikipedia.org)
  • salivary
  • Sjögren's syndrome: Chronic inflammation of the salivary glands may also be an autoimmune disease known as Sjögren's syndrome. (wikipedia.org)
  • IgG4-related sialadenitis: This term refers to IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) involving any of the major salivary glands, i.e. parotid or submandibular glands. (wikipedia.org)
  • muscular
  • The cell bodies for muscular efferent nerves are found in the facial motor nucleus whereas the cell bodies for the parasympathetic efferent nerves are found in the superior salivatory nucleus. (wikipedia.org)
  • fever
  • Play media Kawasaki disease often begins with a high and persistent fever that is not very responsive to normal treatment with paracetamol (acetaminophen) or ibuprofen. (wikipedia.org)
  • Children with fever and neck adenitis who do not respond to antibiotics should have Kawasaki disease considered as part of the differential diagnoses. (wikipedia.org)
  • glands
  • Greater petrosal nerve - It arises at the geniculate ganglion and provides parasympathetic innervation to several glands, including the nasal gland, palatine gland, lacrimal gland, and pharyngeal gland. (wikipedia.org)
  • Synkinesis is an interaction of nerves with muscles (although glands can also be involved). (wikipedia.org)
  • syndromes
  • MCTD may be a recognized autoimmune disease that hasn't fully developed, and it may, or may not, evolve into one of the more defined autoimmune syndromes later on. (newsmax.com)
  • bone
  • A-C , Thin-section (1-mm) coronal and axial CT images of the skull base obtained with an edge-enhancing bone algorithm show enlargement (arrows) of the mastoid canals of cranial nerve VII ( A ), the foramina of ovale ( B ), and rotundum (C) bilaterally. (ajnr.org)
  • stapedius muscle
  • The stapes is also stabilized by the stapedius muscle, which is innervated by the facial nerve. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nerve to stapedius - provides motor innervation for stapedius muscle in middle ear Chorda tympani Submandibular gland Sublingual gland Special sensory taste fibers for the anterior 2/3 of the tongue. (wikipedia.org)