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  • bone
  • Temporary cartilage makes up the skeletal system of the fetus and the infant, forming a model for later replacement by bone bone, hard tissue that forms the skeleton of the body in vertebrate animals. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • In the very young, the skeleton is composed largely of cartilage and is therefore pliable, reducing the incidence of bone fracture and breakage in childhood. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Psoriatic arthritis damages cartilage, synovium and bone of the joints causing pain, impairment and disability making early recognition and intervention important. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • The effect on disease severity (visual scores) as well as parameters of cartilage and bone destruction were evaluated. (bmj.com)
  • Conclusion These results clearly demonstrate that neutralising endogenous IL-18 is therapeutically efficacious in the CIA model and support the use of IL-18 neutralisation as a novel cartilage and bone sparing therapy for the treatment of destructive arthritis. (bmj.com)
  • groups
  • Samples were categorized into age groups and according to their harvesting region in the human auricle (for AUR cartilage only). (uzh.ch)
  • cartilago
  • The triradiate cartilage (in Latin cartilago ypsiloformis) is the 'Y'-shaped epiphyseal plate between the ilium, ischium and pubis to form the acetabulum of the os coxae. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Latin word cartilago, as well as the Ancient Greek word χόνδρος, both mean cartilage, while the ancient Greek word θυρεοειδής means shield-like or shield-shaped. (wikipedia.org)
  • Shark Cartilage
  • Shark cartilage is marketed under a variety of brand names, including Carticin, Cartilade, or BeneFin, and is marketed explicitly or implicitly as a treatment or preventive for various illnesses, including cancer. (wikipedia.org)
  • There is no scientific evidence that shark cartilage is useful in treating or preventing cancer or other diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, shark cartilage supplements are still marketed using the misconception that sharks do not get cancer, a myth that was as popularized by the 1992 book Sharks Don't Get Cancer. (wikipedia.org)
  • Numerous cancers in sharks, including tumors in shark cartilage, were documented by Gary Ostrander and his colleagues from the University of Hawaii in research published in 2004. (wikipedia.org)
  • The ongoing consumption of shark cartilage supplements has been linked to a significant decline in shark populations and the popularity of these supplements has been described as a triumph of pseudoscience and marketing over scientific evaluation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Manufacturers of shark cartilage supplements provide anecdotal testimonials from those who claim to have experienced relief from arthritis symptoms and pain, as a result of taking shark cartilage supplements. (wikipedia.org)
  • Opponents cite existing studies of shark cartilage on a variety of cancers that produced negligible to non-existent results in the prevention or treatment of cancer. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most notable among these was a breast-cancer trial conducted by the Mayo Clinic that stated that the trial "was unable to demonstrate any suggestion of efficacy for this shark cartilage product in patients with advanced cancer. (wikipedia.org)
  • In that study, sponsored by the National Cancer Institute, "researchers did not find a statistical difference in survival" between patients receiving shark cartilage and those taking a placebo. (wikipedia.org)
  • Scientific evidence does not support the efficacy of shark cartilage nor the ability of effective components to remove cancer cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • The fact that people believe eating shark cartilage can cure cancer shows the serious potential impacts of pseudoscience. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are claims that shark cartilage kills cancer cells, boosts the immune system, and prevents new blood vessels from growing to nourish a cancer. (breastcancer.org)
  • The forms available contain different amounts of shark cartilage. (breastcancer.org)
  • No clinical studies show that shark cartilage has any affect on breast cancer or any other cancer. (breastcancer.org)
  • tissue
  • the portion immediately adjacent to the malleus is replaced by fibrous membrane, which constitutes the sphenomandibular ligament , while from the connective tissue covering the remainder of the cartilage the greater part of the mandible is ossified. (wikipedia.org)
  • below, it is connected to the medial crura of the greater alar cartilages by fibrous tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • This drives efforts to develop ways of using a person's own cells to grow, or re-grow cartilage tissue to replace missing or damaged cartilage. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chondrification (also known as chondrogenesis) is the process by which cartilage is formed from condensed mesenchyme tissue, which differentiates into chondroblasts and begins secreting the molecules (aggrecan and collagen type II) that form the extracellular matrix. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cartilage tumors form in Cartilage tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • tumors
  • In some cases tumors that formed in other tissues may produce a cartilage-like matrix, an example of this is the pleomorphic adenoma of the sexual reproduction salivary glands. (wikipedia.org)
  • projections
  • The inferior borders of the sixth, seventh, eighth, and ninth cartilages present heel-like projections at the points of greatest convexity. (wikipedia.org)
  • These projections carry smooth oblong facets which articulate with facets on slight projections from the upper borders of the seventh, eighth, ninth, and tenth cartilages, respectively. (wikipedia.org)
  • inferior
  • Inferior to it are the rings of cartilage around the trachea (which are not continuous - rather they are C-shaped with a gap posteriorly). (wikipedia.org)
  • A counterpart notch at the bottom of the cartilage is called the inferior thyroid notch. (wikipedia.org)
  • laryngeal
  • The presence or absence of the tritical cartilages do not seem to have any noticeable affect on laryngeal function (or anything else). (everything2.com)
  • The cartilage is composed of two halves, which meet in the middle at a peak called the laryngeal prominence, also called the Adam's apple. (wikipedia.org)
  • vertebrates
  • The Meckelian Cartilage , also known as "Meckel's Cartilage", is a piece of cartilage from which the mandibles (lower jaws) of vertebrates evolved. (wikipedia.org)
  • As clearly seen in the lamprey, Cyclostome also has a pair of cartilaginous rods in the embryonic head which is similar to the trabecular cartilages in jawed vertebrates. (wikipedia.org)
  • Then in 1948, Alf Johnels reported the detail of the skeletogenesis of the lamprey, and showed that the "trabecular cartilages" in lamprey appear just beside the notochord, in a similar position to the parachordal cartilages in jawed vertebrates. (wikipedia.org)
  • The "trabecular cartilages" in the Cyclostome is no longer considered to be the homologue of the trabecular in the jawed vertebrates: the (true) trabecular cartilages were firstly acquired in the Gnathostome lineage. (wikipedia.org)
  • muscles
  • It forms the back part of the voice box and functions as an attachment site for muscles, cartilages, and ligaments involved in opening and closing the airway and in producing speech. (wikipedia.org)
  • The cartilage also serves as an attachment for several muscles. (wikipedia.org)
  • mesenchyme
  • The general theory is that the trabecular cartilage is derived from the neural crest mesenchyme which fills anterior to the mandibular arch (premandibular domain). (wikipedia.org)
  • sharks
  • In early fish and in chondrichthyans (cartilaginous fish such as sharks ), the Meckelian Cartilage continued to be the main component of the lower jaw. (wikipedia.org)
  • ridge
  • On it, near the apex of the cartilage, is a rounded elevation (colliculus) from which a ridge (crista arcuata) curves at first backward and then downward and forward to the vocal process. (wikipedia.org)
  • Antihelix: The raised ridge of cartilage between the helix and ear canal. (wikipedia.org)
  • For most people, a rook piercing through a prominent ridge of cartilage will give the jewelry a vertical appearance as the piercing goes from top to bottom of the surface. (wikipedia.org)
  • Snug: The lower ridge of cartilage of the antihelix. (wikipedia.org)
  • apex
  • Helix: The outer rim of cartilage on the ear, extending from just above the lobe to its apex and then curving down slightly to meet the head. (wikipedia.org)
  • outer ear
  • 1) Hearing aid Cartilage conduction can be particularly useful for patients with disorders of the outer ear, including aural atresia, where conventional air conduction hearing aids cannot be used. (wikipedia.org)
  • The basic premise of cartilage conduction hearing aids is that cartilage located outside the ear canal is vibrated, such that the vibration can be transmitted despite the presence of any outer ear disorders. (wikipedia.org)
  • Because hearing contributes to language development, the practical availability of cartilage conduction hearing aids would be beneficial to children who suffer from disorders of the outer ear. (wikipedia.org)
  • anterior
  • Anterior surface of sternum and costal cartilages. (wikipedia.org)
  • Trabecular cartilages, however, originate from the neural crest, and since they are located anterior to the rostral tip of the notochord, they cannot receive signals from the notochord. (wikipedia.org)
  • cellular
  • Some additional examples of cartilage failure mechanisms include cellular matrix linkage rupture, chondrocyte protein synthesis inhibition, and chondrocyte apoptosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • forms
  • The main proteoglycan in cartilage is aggrecan, which, as its name suggests, forms large aggregates with hyaluronan. (wikipedia.org)
  • There is much use of strapwork in which, instead of leather or paper forms being imitated, the shapes may give the impression of imitating flayed skin or cartilage, including the cartilage giving the ear its shape, whether or not this was actually the intention, hence the origin of the name. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cartilage baroque draws heavily on established Renaissance art forms, but gets its distinctive style from added ornamental elements, such as leaves and garlands, and a suppressed curvature. (wikipedia.org)