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  • arteries
  • Sinus node coronary arteries studied with angiography. (springer.com)
  • The test is performed at the patient's bedside by imposing moderate pressure with the fingers, repeatedly massaging the left or the right carotid arteries. (wikipedia.org)
  • Prisoners are reported to have little or no struggle before they go limp because their jugular vein and carotid arteries are blocked and blood flow to the brain is reduced. (wikipedia.org)
  • Estimates have been made that significant occlusion of the carotid arteries and jugular veins occurs with a pressure of around 3.4 N/cm2 (4.9 psi), while the trachea demands six times more at approximately 22 N/cm2 (32 psi). (wikipedia.org)
  • Incomplete occlusion of the carotid arteries is expected and, in cases of homicide, the victim may struggle for a period of time, with unconsciousness typically occurring in 10 to 15 seconds. (wikipedia.org)
  • chemoreceptors
  • Carotid bodies (CB) are peripheral chemoreceptors whose main stimulus is hypoxia, and it was proposed that they can act as glucose sensors implicated in energy homeostasis control. (ul.pt)
  • Cardiac
  • Cardiac sequelae of inappropriate activation of vasomotor centers in the carotid sinus from cranial nerve dysfunction have the potential for morbid consequences. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • 1 , 2 The rationale for supporting this approach is that electric activation of the carotid baroreflex leads to activation of the cardiac parasympathetic drive and inhibition of sympathetic activity to the heart and peripheral vessels. (ahajournals.org)
  • coronary sinus the dilated terminal portion of the great cardiac vein, receiving blood from other veins draining the heart muscle and emptying into the right atrium. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • BRIGNOLE M., MENOZZI C.. The natural history of carotid sinus syncope and the effect of cardiac pacing. (explainmedicine.com)
  • Variations of the maneuver can be used either in medical examination as a test of cardiac function and autonomic nervous control of the heart, or to clear the ears and sinuses (that is, to equalize pressure between them) when ambient pressure changes, as in diving, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, or air travel. (wikipedia.org)
  • transient
  • Since these plaques, if large and unstable, predispose to ischemic strokes and transient ischemic attacks, carotid endarterectomies are frequently done for prophylaxis. (wikipedia.org)
  • etiology
  • The most probable predominant etiology is a degenerative process of the sinus node with frequent involvement of the AV node. (springer.com)
  • treatment
  • 1. Carotid baroreceptor manipulation (neckchamber technique) and passive head-up tilting were used in ten patients with renovascular hypertension and in five subjects with essential hypertension under diuretic treatment to study reflex control of renin secretion" at high basal-renin production rates. (clinsci.org)
  • body
  • cavernous sinus an irregularly shaped venous channel between the layers of dura mater of the brain, one on either side of the body of the sphenoid bone and communicating across the midline. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • maxillary sinus one of the paired paranasal sinuses in the body of the maxilla on either side, opening into the middle nasal meatus on the same side. (thefreedictionary.com)