Loading...



  • elderly
  • Studies[citation needed] have also suggested that the carotid sinus reflex can be a contributing factor in other mechanisms of death by reducing blood pressure and heart rate, especially in the elderly or in people suffering from carotid sinus hypersensitivity. (wikipedia.org)
  • Causes
  • The carotid sinus can be oversensitive to manual stimulation, a condition known as carotid sinus hypersensitivity, carotid sinus syndrome or carotid sinus syncope, in which manual stimulation causes large changes in heart rate and/or blood pressure. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is less effective than pharmaceutical management of SVT with verapamil or adenosine though is still the preferred first line of treatment in a hemodynamically stable patient Carotid sinus reflex death is a potential etiology of sudden death in which manual stimulation of the carotid sinus allegedly causes strong glossopharyngeal nerve (Vagus nerve is for aortic arch baroreceptors) impulses leading to terminal cardiac arrest. (wikipedia.org)
  • death
  • Carotid sinus reflex death has been pointed out as a possible cause of death in cases of strangulation, hanging and autoerotic strangulation, but such deductions remain controversial. (wikipedia.org)
  • patients with carotid
  • In one study of patients with carotid artery dissection, 60% had infarcts documented on neuroimaging. (wikipedia.org)
  • Clinical guidelines (such as those of National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE)[citation needed]) recommend that all patients with carotid stenosis be given medication, usually blood pressure lowering medications, anti-clotting medications, anti-platelet medications (such as aspirin or clopidogrel), and especially statins (which were originally prescribed for their cholesterol-lowering effects but were also found to reduce inflammation and stabilize plaque). (wikipedia.org)
  • cranial nerves
  • The compartments of each guttural pouch contain many important structures including several cranial nerves and arteries that lie directly against the pouch as they pass into and out of foramina in the caudal aspect of the skull. (wikipedia.org)
  • cerebral
  • Summary of Review- After a brief account of the anatomy of the WS and the cerebrovascular physiology in circumstances of low perfusion pressure, the literature concerning the mechanisms of WS infarction in carotid disease is reviewed and discussed with emphasis on imaging and ultrasound studies of the cerebral hemodynamics. (ahajournals.org)
  • Compared with eight normal controls, the patients had significantly (p less than 0.01) decreased regional cerebral blood flow in the middle cerebral artery territory and the surrounding watershed areas of the occluded hemisphere. (ahajournals.org)
  • However, when blood clots form and break off from the site of the tear, they form emboli, which can travel through the arteries to the brain and block the blood supply to the brain, resulting in an ischaemic stroke, otherwise known as a cerebral infarction. (wikipedia.org)
  • siphon
  • To determine the incidence of incidental calcifications of the carotid siphon on temporal bone CT in children. (ovid.com)
  • angiographic
  • The segments are subdivided based on anatomical and microsurgical landmarks and surrounding anatomy, more than angiographic appearance of the artery. (wikipedia.org)
  • Stroke
  • Here we review the evidence regarding the mechanisms for WS stroke in carotid disease and whether they differ between cortical and internal WS infarcts. (ahajournals.org)
  • Pieces of plaque can break off and block the small arteries above in the brain, which causes a stroke. (wikipedia.org)
  • infarcts
  • Background and Purpose- In carotid disease, infarcts can occur in the cortical as well as internal watershed (WS), or both. (ahajournals.org)
  • Based on the high prevalence of microembolic signals documented by ultrasound in symptomatic carotid disease, a recent hypothesis postulates that embolism and hypoperfusion play a synergetic role, according to which small embolic material prone to lodge in distal field arterioles would be more likely to result in cortical micro-infarcts when chronic hypoperfusion prevails. (ahajournals.org)
  • temporal bone
  • The petrous segment, or C2, of the internal carotid is that which is inside the petrous part of the temporal bone. (wikipedia.org)
  • Incidental internal carotid artery (ICA) calcifications are occasionally noted on CT images of the brain and temporal bone. (ovid.com)
  • Incidentally noted ICA calcifications are a common finding on temporal bone CT in children, most likely a physiologic response to turbulent flow at natural bends in the artery rather than secondary to underlying disease predisposing to early atherosclerotic calcification. (ovid.com)
  • Internal acoustic meatus Temporal bone at birth. (wikipedia.org)
  • elderly
  • Studies[citation needed] have also suggested that the carotid sinus reflex can be a contributing factor in other mechanisms of death by reducing blood pressure and heart rate, especially in the elderly or in people suffering from carotid sinus hypersensitivity. (wikipedia.org)
  • Causes
  • The carotid sinus can be oversensitive to manual stimulation, a condition known as carotid sinus hypersensitivity, carotid sinus syndrome or carotid sinus syncope, in which manual stimulation causes large changes in heart rate and/or blood pressure. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is less effective than pharmaceutical management of SVT with verapamil or adenosine though is still the preferred first line of treatment in a hemodynamically stable patient Carotid sinus reflex death is a potential etiology of sudden death in which manual stimulation of the carotid sinus allegedly causes strong glossopharyngeal nerve (Vagus nerve is for aortic arch baroreceptors) impulses leading to terminal cardiac arrest. (wikipedia.org)
  • death
  • Carotid sinus reflex death has been pointed out as a possible cause of death in cases of strangulation, hanging and autoerotic strangulation, but such deductions remain controversial. (wikipedia.org)
  • intima media thi
  • This is why I have begun to use carotid intima media thickness (CIMT) measurements as part of my routine workup to screen patients. (ndnr.com)
  • ARIC investigators ascertained the effect size of numerous established and candidate risk factors in well characterized populations using the intima-media thickness of the common carotid arteries as surrogate marker for atherosclerosis and cardiovascular endpoints as outcomes. (wikipedia.org)
  • ramus of the m
  • Lower part of the Temporalis and masseter muscles (origin of masseter muscle:lower margin of the inner surface of zygomatic bone insertion : outer surface of the ramus of the mandible ) Lateral and medial pterygoid muscles The internal maxillary vessels, consisting of the maxillary artery originating from the external carotid artery and its branches. (wikipedia.org)
  • The retromandibular vein (temporomaxillary vein, posterior facial vein), formed by the union of the superficial temporal and maxillary veins, descends in the substance of the parotid gland, superficial to the external carotid artery but beneath the facial nerve, between the ramus of the mandible and the sternocleidomastoideus muscle. (wikipedia.org)
  • The facial artery arises in the carotid triangle from the external carotid artery a little above the lingual artery and, sheltered by the ramus of the mandible, passes obliquely up beneath the digastric and stylohyoid muscles, over which it arches to enter a groove on the posterior surface of the submandibular gland. (wikipedia.org)
  • inferior
  • This part of the artery is covered by the Semispinalis capitis and is contained in the suboccipital triangle-a triangular space bounded by the Rectus capitis posterior major, the Obliquus superior, and the Obliquus inferior. (wikipedia.org)
  • vessels
  • The Department of Vascular Surgery in Schwabingdeals with the diagnosis and treatment of arterial and venous vascular artery and focus on the treatment of circulatory disorders of the neck vessels due to deposition, diseases of the aorta, circulatory disorders of the femoral arteries and varicose veins. (bookinghealth.com)
  • external
  • The FDA already trusts secure external servers for e-mail communication of clinical trial data, and recently were testing their own internal or private cloud. (blogspot.hu)
  • stroke
  • An embolic stroke refers to the blockage of an artery by an embolus, a traveling particle or debris in the arterial bloodstream originating elsewhere. (wikipedia.org)
  • passes
  • passes forward and upward across the cheek to the angle of the mouth, then ascends along the side of the nose, and ends at the medial commissure of the eye, under the name of the angular artery. (wikipedia.org)
  • result
  • A thrombus forms when the endothelium is activated by a variety of signals to result in platelet aggregation in the artery. (wikipedia.org)
  • Medicine
  • Relationship between periodontitis and diabetes: importance of a clinical study to prove the vicious cycle," Internal Medicine , vol. 49, no. 10, pp. 881-885, 2010. (hindawi.com)
  • Wolfgang Patsch (born 10 August 1946, Wels) is an Austrian physician, specialized in internal medicine/laboratory medicine and a professor in the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology at the Paracelsus Private Medical University of Salzburg. (wikipedia.org)
  • Patsch began his career as a resident in the Department of Internal Medicine at the University of Innsbruck in 1971. (wikipedia.org)
  • He obtained his licensure for internal medicine in 1977 and was named assistant professor. (wikipedia.org)
  • He was board-certified for internal medicine in 1987 and obtained his medical licensure for Texas in 1988. (wikipedia.org)