• adaptor
  • Some import cargoes bind directly to an importin-β receptor, while others interact with an importin-α adaptor, which associates with an importin-β receptor ( G orlich and K utay 1999 ). (genetics.org)
  • Yeast dynein can walk along microtubules without detaching, however in metazoans, cytoplasmic dynein must be activated by the binding of dynactin, another multisubunit protein that is essential for mitosis, and a cargo adaptor. (wikipedia.org)
  • The tri-complex, which includes dynein, dynactin and a cargo adaptor, is ultra-processive and can walk long distances without detaching in order to reach the cargo's intracellular destination. (wikipedia.org)
  • BICDL1 (BICD Family Like Cargo Adaptor 1) is a Protein Coding gene. (genecards.org)
  • cellular
  • In the present study, we have investigated the effect of the aqueous extract of cigarette smoke (AECS) on tubulin-microtubule, a major cytoskeleton protein that maintains cellular morphology and participates in cell division. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Since ergosterol shortage provokes alterations in the plasma membrane composition, an important role of this cellular structure in protein secretion is suggested. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Dynein transports various cellular cargos, provides forces and displacements important in mitosis, and drives the beat of eukaryotic cilia and flagella. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mechanistically, ILF3 becomes phosphorylated and activated by the double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase/PKR which releases ILF3 from cellular mature circRNAs. (genecards.org)
  • This tandem activation loop phosphorylation (that was proposed to be either distributive or processive, dependent on cellular environment) is performed by members of the Ste7 protein kinase family, also known as MAP2 kinases. (wikipedia.org)
  • vesicles
  • The severing event results in the release of cargo‐laden intralumenal vesicles (ILVs) into the interior of the MVB. (embopress.org)
  • It also helps transport cargo needed for cell function such as vesicles made by the endoplasmic reticulum, endosomes, and lysosomes (Karp, 2005). (wikipedia.org)
  • cytosol
  • Disruption of this gene results in reduced numbers of endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi intermediate compartment clusters and redistribution of coat protein I to the cytosol. (genecards.org)
  • binds
  • p>This subsection of the 'Function' section describes a region in the protein which binds nucleotide phosphates. (uniprot.org)
  • The other projection, the extended tail, binds to the light intermediate, intermediate and light chain subunits which attach dynein to its cargo. (wikipedia.org)
  • genes
  • A large number of illnesses and diseases are caused by mutations in alleles of the genes that regulate the production of actin or of its associated proteins. (wikipedia.org)
  • molecular
  • With state-of-the art molecular biology and protein biochemistry labs, we work with our clients to rapidly evaluate in parallel to identify the optimal expression system for candidate proteins. (abgent.com)
  • adapter
  • Laa1 interacted with the clathrin-associated adapter complex AP-1 and was important for the correct localization of the AP-1 complex in Golgi/endosomes, establishing the evolutionary conservation of the function of this protein in AP-1 mediated endosomal trafficking. (cannabinoid-receptor.com)
  • Expression
  • This protein (NF90, ILF3) forms a heterodimer with a 45 kDa transcription factor (NF45, ILF2) required for T-cell expression of interleukin 2. (genecards.org)
  • complexes
  • These ubiquitin‐associated activities are directed mainly by the ESCRT‐I and ESCRT‐II complexes and the ESCRT‐associated protein ALIX. (embopress.org)
  • actin
  • Actin is a family of globular multi-functional proteins that form microfilaments. (wikipedia.org)
  • An actin protein is the monomeric subunit of two types of filaments in cells: microfilaments, one of the three major components of the cytoskeleton, and thin filaments, part of the contractile apparatus in muscle cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • The evolutionary origin of actin can be traced to prokaryotic cells, which have equivalent proteins. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1942, Straub developed a novel technique for extracting muscle protein that allowed him to isolate substantial amounts of relatively pure actin. (wikipedia.org)
  • Szent-Gyorgyi had previously described the more viscous form of myosin produced by slow muscle extractions as 'activated' myosin, and, since Straub's protein produced the activating effect, it was dubbed actin. (wikipedia.org)
  • Straub continued to work on actin, and in 1950 reported that actin contains bound ATP and that, during polymerization of the protein into microfilaments, the nucleotide is hydrolyzed to ADP and inorganic phosphate (which remain bound to the microfilament). (wikipedia.org)
  • microtubules
  • Tea1 is a landmark protein that is transported on the plus ends of microtubules and is deposited at the ends of the cell, where it plays an important role in the initiation of a second site of growth ( Mata and Nurse, 1997 ). (biologists.org)
  • pathways
  • The precise tissue-specific and temporal regulation of nuclear protein import is also critical in the regulation of cell cycle progression and in developmental and signal transduction pathways (reviewed in K affman and O'S hea 1999 ). (genetics.org)
  • encode
  • The L genome of the H. uvarum L-dsRNA virion HuV-L was shown to encode a 77-kDa major capsid protein. (jove.com)
  • pathway
  • The formation of multivesicular bodies (MVBs) is a key step in this pathway, and the ESCRT proteins comprise the main machinery of MVB biogenesis (Hanson & Cashikar, 2012 ). (embopress.org)
  • cell
  • Considering the relevance of yeast cell factories for commercial purposes and the tight interrelation between environmental stresses and protein folding and secretion, such comprehensive studies are currently emerging as promising platforms for systematic yeast strain engineering. (biomedcentral.com)
  • family
  • The importin-β family of transport receptors, also called karyopherins, or more specifically, importins or exportins, carries cargoes both into and out of the nucleus. (genetics.org)
  • reporter
  • The assay makes use of a fluorescent reporter, Rosella, which is a dual-emission biosensor comprising a relatively pH-stable red fluorescent protein linked to a pH-sensitive green fluorescent protein. (jove.com)
  • targets
  • The importin-β subunit of both of these types of transport complex targets them to the NE by binding to proteins at the nuclear pore complex (reviewed in G orlich and K utay 1999 ). (genetics.org)
  • Such studies allowed for the identification of novel targets related with protein trafficking and ergosterol biosynthesis for improved recombinant protein production. (biomedcentral.com)
  • essential
  • RNA-binding protein that plays an essential role in the biogenesis of circular RNAs (circRNAs) which are produced by back-splicing circularization of pre-mRNAs. (genecards.org)
  • various
  • Although various kinds of proteins have been found to distribute or immigrate to this organelle, their functions have still not been completely worked out. (biomedsearch.com)
  • transport
  • The nuclear import of classical nuclear localization signal-containing proteins depends on importin-α transport receptors. (genetics.org)
  • The alternating activity of the paired heavy chains in the complete cytoplasmic dynein motor enables a single dynein molecule to transport its cargo by "walking" a considerable distance along a microtubule without becoming completely detached. (wikipedia.org)
  • sequence
  • Note that the 'protein existence' evidence does not give information on the accuracy or correctness of the sequence(s) displayed. (uniprot.org)
  • activity
  • The force-generating ATPase activity of each dynein heavy chain is located in its large doughnut-shaped "head", which is related to other AAA proteins, while two projections from the head connect it to other cytoplasmic structures. (wikipedia.org)