• 1994
  • This study focused on changes in demographic, social, and health-care patterns and pregnancy outcome related to maternal age from 1978-79 to 1994 in Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo State, Brazil. (scielo.br)
  • utilization
  • The vendor must be able to provide information and counseling to a provider whose practice patterns are outside the norms, in consultation with the agency, to improve patient care and reduce inappropriate utilization. (flsenate.gov)
  • hospitals
  • Abortion in Paraguay List of hospitals in Paraguay Water supply and sanitation in Paraguay South America Life Quality Rankings - Health Rankings Paraguay country profile. (wikipedia.org)
  • The facility is a member of the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Its network of health care providers includes nearly 160 area hospitals and more than 42,000 physicians and other health care professionals. (wikipedia.org)
  • As of December 31, 2016, the non-profit Kaiser Foundation Health Plan and Kaiser Foundation Hospitals entities reported a combined $1.9 billion in net income on $64.6 billion in operating revenues. (wikipedia.org)
  • KP's quality of care has been highly rated and attributed to a strong emphasis on preventive care, its doctors being salaried rather than paid on a fee-for-service basis, and an attempt to minimize the time patients spend in high-cost hospitals by carefully planning their stay. (wikipedia.org)
  • According to Form 990 governance questions, Kaiser Foundation Hospitals and Kaiser Foundation Health Plan do not have members with the power to appoint or elect board members, meaning that the board itself nominates and appoints new members. (wikipedia.org)
  • The health plans are not-for-profit and provide infrastructure for and invest in Kaiser Foundation Hospitals and provide a tax-exempt shelter for the for-profit medical groups. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1944
  • The federal HMO Act amended the Public Health Service Act, which Congress passed in 1944. (wikipedia.org)
  • By August 1944, 92.2 percent of all Richmond shipyard employees had joined the plan, the first voluntary group plan in the country to feature group medical practice, prepayment and substantial medical facilities on such a large scale. (wikipedia.org)
  • program
  • By the end of the project, our goal is to establish a locally operated, self-sustaining prepaid health care delivery program that measurably decreases mortality and increases quality of life. (managedcaremag.com)
  • Since 1991, Gouverneur has been an outpatient and teaching center for NYU's Primary Care Internal Medicine Residency Program. (wikipedia.org)
  • William Lyon Mackenzie King promised to introduce such a scheme, but while he created the Department of Health he failed to introduce a national program. (wikipedia.org)
  • Launched in 2009, HMSA365 was created in conjunction with the national Blue365, a health and wellness discount program of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. (wikipedia.org)
  • An employee assistance program (EAP) is an employee benefit program that assists employees with personal problems and/or work-related problems that may impact their job performance, health, mental and emotional well-being. (wikipedia.org)
  • In November 2012, EmblemHealth began establishing a community presence in its service area by launching a hybrid care coordination and wellness program called Neighborhood Care. (wikipedia.org)
  • establish
  • Armed with a five-year, $750,000 grant from the U.S. Agency for International Development, Land O' Lakes aproached HealthPartners in 1997 to help dairy cooperatives in rural Uganda establish sustainable, prepaid health care delivery programs. (managedcaremag.com)
  • 1999
  • In 1999, the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) awarded Health Plan Hawaii with the highest HMO accreditation possible. (wikipedia.org)
  • scheme
  • In addition, we began educating hospital, cooperative, and community leaders about the steps necessary to set up a prepaid system (or "scheme," as, following British usage, it is positively referred to in Uganda). (managedcaremag.com)
  • expenditure
  • Community Based Long-Term Care, Half-Year Expenditure Split, Hospice Request, and Footnote Colorado Choice Transitions. (colorado.gov)
  • provide
  • GAO also found that the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) and Arizona did not provide adequate financial oversight in the first few years of AHCCCS and, as a result, AHCCCS plans neither complied with federal disclosure requirements nor filed state-mandated financial reports. (gao.gov)
  • Plan B does not provide for suchitems as care in a nursing home, prescription drugs, and routine physical exams. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • In either case, the HMO takes a greater level of involvement in the patient's care, assigning a case manager to the patient or a group of patients to ensure that no two providers provide overlapping care, and to ensure that the patient is receiving appropriate treatment, so that the condition does not worsen beyond what can be helped. (wikipedia.org)
  • Tommy Douglas had hoped to provide universal health care, but the province did not have the money. (wikipedia.org)
  • In February 2016, EmblemHealth announced a new partnership with the City of New York and the Municipal Labor Committee to provide expanded access to health care. (wikipedia.org)
  • This hospital was set up to provide medical care for the 5,000 workers on the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California's aqueduct, which was designed to bring water from the Colorado River to Los Angeles. (wikipedia.org)
  • Garfield was able to provide medical and hospital care for the workers for industrial accidents. (wikipedia.org)
  • elderly
  • Although 18 states offered managed care plans for disabled or elderly beneficiaries eligible for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) in 1993, only a small fraction of this population is enrolled in managed care. (kff.org)
  • 1973
  • In 1973 he founded Interstudy, a health policy think tank based in Minnesota, where he served as Executive Director. (wikipedia.org)
  • hospital
  • Built in 1955 to replace the smaller hospital at the Kaiser Steel Mill, the facility now serves over 400,000 members of Kaiser Permanente's health care plans in the area. (wikipedia.org)
  • Gouverneur Health (formerly Gouverneur Hospital) is a municipally owned healthcare facility affiliated with the New York University School of Medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • The health care plan HIP has its origins in Gouverneur Hospital. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sponsored by Kaiser's Permanente Foundation, it was run by Medical Director Sidney R. Garfield, M.D. The Field Hospital served as the mid-level component of a three-tier medical care system that also included six well-equipped First Aid Stations at the individual shipyards, and the main Permanente Hospital in Oakland, where the most critical cases were treated. (wikipedia.org)
  • National Park Superintendent Martha Lee stated that the hospital "was the center of the nation's first prepaid health care system and was a precursor of today's HMO's [sic]. (wikipedia.org)
  • The hospital foundations are not-for-profit and rely on the Kaiser Foundation Health Plans for funding. (wikipedia.org)
  • Garfield
  • The system worked so well that Garfield decided to offer total medical care for the workers for an additional nickel a day from the workers themselves. (wikipedia.org)
  • members
  • Through the collection of dues - an average premium is about $1.98 per month for a family of four - members receive the health care benefits that they decide as a group to buy. (managedcaremag.com)
  • HealthPartners also provides health education to members of the cooperatives and their communities, and customizes and promotes schemes among cooperative groups and others. (managedcaremag.com)
  • After the Blue Cross/Blue Shield plans were developed, however, the traditional insurers noted the community rating practices and realized that they could enter the market and attract the healthier community members with lower rates than the community rates. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • HMSA's health and wellness programs help members stay healthy and avoid costly chronic diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • The name was chosen because health plan members can receive the discounts 365 days of the year to help them stay healthy and fit. (wikipedia.org)
  • ConnectiCare's members have access to a provider network of approximately 19,900 health care providers. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2016
  • Two additional Neighborhood Care sites were subsequently established in Chinatown in December 2013 and in Crown Heights in April 2016. (wikipedia.org)
  • Wellness
  • The facilities also host informational sessions, health screenings, health and wellness activities, exercise classes, and sponsorships of local farmers' markets. (wikipedia.org)
  • doctors
  • Each covered member chooses or is assigned a primary-care physician from doctors in the plan. (pelliccionifinancialconsulting.com)
  • Thus, most of the money spent on private health care (about 88 percent) is on a fee-for-service basis, effectively preventing the poor population from seeing private doctors. (wikipedia.org)
  • The husband of a nurse who said she was told by doctors not to worry about a growing lump in her breast during pregnancy won a $651,482 decision yesterday against a prepaid group medical practice for a misdiagnosis of the cancer that eventually led to her death. (washingtonpost.com)
  • Doctors would promote preventive medicine and would be less inclined to order costly procedures that had not been proven to improve health outcomes. (wikipedia.org)
  • group
  • Though some forms of group "managed care" did exist prior to the 1970s, in the USA they came about chiefly through the influence of U.S. President Richard Nixon and his friend Edgar Kaiser. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1971, Ellwood founded the Jackson Hole Group, a "loosely organized but highly regarded" group of politicians, providers, and policymakers who came together in the town of Jackson Hole, Wyoming to discuss ideas for changing the health care incentive structure. (wikipedia.org)
  • A key member of the group was Alain Enthoven, a Stanford economist who was instrumental in shaping the concept of "managed competition" in health care. (wikipedia.org)
  • Subsequently, when the Clinton administration was grappling with health care reform, the Jackson Hole Group, according to the New York Times, was "one of the most important influences in the shaping of the Clinton plan. (wikipedia.org)
  • The plan was called managed competition, and two of its most prominent advocates from the Jackson Hole Group were Ellwood and Alain Enthoven. (wikipedia.org)
  • access
  • It reflects the widely held belief that managed care can improve health care access as well as promote cost containment and budget control. (kff.org)
  • A 2001 survey indicated that 27 percent of the population still had no access to medical care, public or private. (wikipedia.org)
  • Open access" and "POS" (point of service) products are a combination of an HMO and traditional indemnity plan. (wikipedia.org)
  • providers
  • The insured can see any health-care provider within a preferred network of providers and pays a copayment for each visit. (pelliccionifinancialconsulting.com)
  • POS plans also use a network of preferred providers. (pelliccionifinancialconsulting.com)
  • Ugandan providers also benefit because revenue flow is more predictable, more people can afford health care, customers are retained, and revenue is increased. (managedcaremag.com)
  • More recently, he has advanced an agenda for monitoring health outcomes, so that patients, providers, and payers can make health care decisions based on real information about what treatments and providers are actually effective. (wikipedia.org)
  • His growing conviction that this calculus - putting the interests of health care providers over patient well-being - characterized the American medical system in general, led him to conceive of and advocate for alternative approaches. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since the events of September 11, 2001, EAP specialists have become more involved in incident debriefing and implementing plans during emergencies Providers began to report more on the workforce experiencing Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), and an increase in stress and depression. (wikipedia.org)
  • costs
  • Despite significant improvements in some maternal characteristics, the proportion of teenage pregnancies, preterm deliveries, low birthweight, and cesareans increased, raising concerns about the health costs and consequences for mothers and infants. (scielo.br)
  • how to take the pain out of the 'medigap' that lies between federal assistance and actual costs of health care. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • cost containment
  • Although businesses pursued the HMO model for its alleged cost containment benefits, some research indicates that private HMO plans don't achieve any significant cost savings over non-HMO plans. (wikipedia.org)
  • mental health
  • However, Kaiser has had disputes with its employees' unions, repeatedly faced civil and criminal charges for falsification of records and patient dumping, faced action by regulators over the quality of care it provided, especially to patients with mental health issues, and has faced criticism from activists and action from regulators over the size of its cash reserves. (wikipedia.org)
  • Queens
  • The first two Neighborhood Care facilities were located in Harlem and Cambria Heights, Queens. (wikipedia.org)
  • deductible
  • Although Plan B has a $75.00 deductible for the year, A.A.R.P. (the American Association of Retired Persons) calls the plan one of the best bargains to be found. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • demographic
  • Demographic changes have occurred in many countries due to the introduction of new contraceptive methods and family planning programs. (scielo.br)
  • thus
  • In discussion in the White House on February 17, 1971, Nixon expressed his support for the essential philosophy of the HMO, which John Ehrlichman explained thus: "All the incentives are toward less medical care, because the less care they give them, the more money they make. (wikipedia.org)
  • There had thus been a long history of government involvement in Saskatchewan health care, and a significant section of it was already controlled and paid for by the government. (wikipedia.org)
  • include
  • The bill would revise the planning council's duties to include reviewing, assessing, and making recommendations with respect to substance use disorders, and would make related changes to the planning council's duties to incorporate substance use disorders. (ca.gov)
  • After the war ended, the Health Plan was expanded to include workers' families. (wikipedia.org)
  • New health plan participants were recruited and expanded to include workers' families as well. (wikipedia.org)
  • catastrophic
  • Other choices for managing care are case management, in which patients with catastrophic cases are identified, or disease management, in which patients with certain chronic diseases like diabetes, asthma, or some forms of cancer are identified. (wikipedia.org)
  • During the 1950s, HMSA introduced a Major Medical Plan to help protect against the cost of catastrophic illness. (wikipedia.org)
  • private
  • In 1919 the Home for Hebrew Infants tested and proved the superiority of an alternative to institutionalized care by placing orphans with foster parents in private homes. (wikipedia.org)