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  • pediatric cardiac surgery
  • He spent six months as the Chief Resident in Pediatric Cardiac Surgery under Professor Aldo Castaneda, and attending surgeons, Richard Jonas, John Mayer, and Frank Hanley. (wikipedia.org)
  • When Hanley accepted the position of Chief of Pediatric Cardiac Surgery at the University of California, San Francisco, Burke was offered his position, and he joined the Children's Hospital Boston attending staff in 1992, becoming an Instructor in Surgery at the Harvard Medical School. (wikipedia.org)
  • percutaneous
  • 6 Background Percutaneous Transhepatic Cholangiography (PTC) has been performed for 2 decades with low morbidity other transhepatic procedures portal venous system hemodynamics localize occult neuroendocrine tumors embolization of varices To overcome these limitations to venous access. (slideplayer.com)
  • atrial
  • The upward deflections are the "a" (atrial contraction), "c" (ventricular contraction and resulting bulging of tricuspid into the right atrium during isovolumetric systole) and "v" = venous filling The downward deflections of the wave are the "x" (the atrium relaxes and the tricuspid valve moves downward) and the "y" descent (filling of ventricle after tricuspid opening). (wikipedia.org)
  • The loss of the atrial kick due to atrial fibrillation ( i.e. blood cannot flow into the left ventricle thus accumulating in the left atrium ) can cause a precipitous decrease in cardiac output and sudden congestive heart failure. (wikipedia.org)
  • arterial
  • citation needed] Patent foramen ovale in underwater divers is considered a risk factor for arterial gas embolism due to shunt of what would otherwise be asymptomatic venous bubbles into the systemic arteries. (wikipedia.org)
  • inferior
  • Her serial ECG's showed dynamic changes (initial bradycardia, PR prolongation followed by ST segment elevation in inferior leads) which was indicative of cardiac ischemia. (jscimedcentral.com)
  • Centers
  • Central line-associated bloodstream infection: The Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) develops definitions that are used for surveillance. (renalandurologynews.com)
  • Specialized hospitals that provide higher levels of care may include services such as neonatal intensive care (NICU), pediatric intensive care (PICU), state regional burn centres, specialized care for spinal injury and/or neurosurgery, regional stroke centers, specialized cardiac care (Cardiac catheterization), and specialized/regional trauma care. (wikipedia.org)
  • patients
  • Mechanical Circulatory Support Devices (MCSDs) are placed in large veins or arteries to augment or maintain cardiac function in patients with severe heart failure. (renalandurologynews.com)
  • Patient days, while easier to obtain, may underestimate the CLABSI rate as not all patients have central lines. (renalandurologynews.com)
  • We performed a catheterization study measuring simultaneous pressure and flow velocity to calculate EL in nine patients (mean age 2.3 ± 0.3 years) 1 year after the Fontan procedure. (springer.com)
  • Moreover, no previous study has proved whether or not EL significantly influences cardiac performance in Fontan patients. (springer.com)
  • usually to facilitate the provision of a higher level or more specialized field of care but also to transfer patients from a specialized facility to a local hospital or nursing home when they no longer require the services of that specialized hospital, such as following successful cardiac catheterization due to a heart attack. (wikipedia.org)
  • output
  • Cardiac output (CO, also denoted by the symbols Q {\displaystyle Q} and Q ˙ c {\displaystyle {\dot {Q}}_{c}} ), is a term used in cardiac physiology that describes the volume of blood being pumped by the heart, in particular by the left or right ventricle, per unit time. (wikipedia.org)
  • Values for cardiac output are usually denoted as L/min. (wikipedia.org)
  • Because cardiac output is related to the quantity of blood delivered to various parts of the body, it is an important indicator of how efficiently the heart can meet the body's demands for perfusion. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cardiac output is a global blood flow parameter of interest in hæmodynamics, the study of the flow of blood. (wikipedia.org)
  • The factors affecting stroke volume and heart rate also affect cardiac output. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is especially important during mechanical ventilation, in which cardiac output can vary by up to 50%[citation needed] across a single respiratory cycle. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cardiac output should therefore be measured at evenly spaced points over a single cycle or averaged over several cycles. (wikipedia.org)
  • The result is then multiplied by the heart rate (HR) to obtain cardiac output. (wikipedia.org)
  • Play media Heart failure is a physiological state in which cardiac output is insufficient to meet the needs of the body and lungs. (wikipedia.org)
  • High-output heart failure can occur when there is an increased cardiac output. (wikipedia.org)
  • In advanced cases, the disease may cause high-output cardiac failure and death. (wikipedia.org)
  • This gradient may be increased by increases in the heart rate or cardiac output. (wikipedia.org)
  • pressure
  • BNP (brain natriuretic peptide) or pro-BNP levels are often elevated due to increased cardiac pressure/volume and increased myocardial wall stress. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • The " v " wave corresponds to Venous filling when the tricuspid valve is closed and venous pressure increases from venous return - this occurs during and following the carotid pulse. (wikipedia.org)
  • The water-filled, pulsatile pressure suits were developed to effect venous return. (wikipedia.org)
  • surgery
  • Blood gases may also be ordered when someone has head or neck trauma, which may affect breathing, and when someone is undergoing prolonged anesthesia - particularly for cardiac bypass surgery or brain surgery - to monitor blood gases during, and for a period after, the procedure. (labcorp.com)
  • One-time catheterization following surgery may not be necessary if other measures to induce voiding are tried. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Small amounts of air often get into the blood circulation accidentally during surgery and other medical procedures (for example, a bubble entering an intravenous fluid line), but most of these air emboli enter the veins and are stopped at the lungs, and thus a venous air embolism that shows any symptoms is very rare. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1989, after completing general surgery training at the Brigham, and in preparation for cardiac surgery training, Burke spent a year as a research fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, in the Spectroscopy Laboratory, under Michael Stephen Feld, PhD. Burke developed the idea that Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy could be used to diagnose rejection in transplanted cardiac tissue, thereby avoiding the need for traumatic biopsies. (wikipedia.org)
  • Burke was selected for cardiac surgery training at the Brigham and Women's Hospital, under program director Lawrence H. Cohn. (wikipedia.org)
  • circulation
  • Inert gas bubbles arising from decompression are generally formed in the venous side of the systemic circulation, where inert gas concentrations are highest, these bubbles are generally trapped in the capillaries of the lungs where they will usually be eliminated without causing symptoms. (wikipedia.org)
  • arteries
  • Breathing gas introduced into the venous system of the lungs due to pulmonary barotrauma will not be trapped in the alveolar capillaries, and will consequently be circulated to the rest of the body through the systemic arteries, with a high risk of embolism. (wikipedia.org)
  • pulse
  • The JVP and carotid pulse can be differentiated several ways: multiphasic - the JVP "beats" twice (in quick succession) in the cardiac cycle. (wikipedia.org)
  • anaesthesia
  • Altogether, the beneficial haemodynamic profile combined with its putative organ-protective properties could render xenon an attractive option for anaesthesia of children undergoing cardiac catheterization. (springer.com)
  • In a phase-II, mono-centre, prospective, single-blind, randomised, controlled study, we will test the hypothesis that the administration of 50% xenon as an adjuvant to general anaesthesia with sevoflurane in children undergoing elective cardiac catheterization is safe and feasible. (springer.com)
  • ventricle
  • In normal cardiac physiology, the mitral valve opens during left ventricular diastole, to allow blood to flow from the left atrium to the left ventricle. (wikipedia.org)
  • arrest
  • Heart failure is not the same as myocardial infarction (in which part of the heart muscle dies) or cardiac arrest (in which blood flow stops altogether). (wikipedia.org)
  • Targeted temperature management improves survival and brain function following resuscitation from cardiac arrest. (wikipedia.org)
  • Evidence supports its use following certain types of cardiac arrest in which an individual does not regain consciousness. (wikipedia.org)
  • Targeted temperature management may be used in the following conditions: The 2013 ILCOR and 2010 American Heart Association guidelines support the use of cooling following resuscitation from cardiac arrest. (wikipedia.org)
  • These recommendations were largely based on two trials from 2002 which showed improved survival and brain function when cooled to 32-34 °C (90-93 °F) after cardiac arrest. (wikipedia.org)