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  • atrial
  • (psychiatryadvisor.com)
  • The upward deflections are the "a" (atrial contraction), "c" (ventricular contraction and resulting bulging of tricuspid into the right atrium during isovolumetric systole) and "v" = venous filling The downward deflections of the wave are the "x" (the atrium relaxes and the tricuspid valve moves downward) and the "y" descent (filling of ventricle after tricuspid opening). (wikipedia.org)
  • The loss of the atrial kick due to atrial fibrillation ( i.e. blood cannot flow into the left ventricle thus accumulating in the left atrium ) can cause a precipitous decrease in cardiac output and sudden congestive heart failure. (wikipedia.org)
  • pressures
  • Once hemodynamic stability is achieved, the primary goal is to reduce the cardiac filling pressures and decrease circulating volume through prompt and aggressive diuresis. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • A transthoracic echocardiogram can evaluate contractile function, determine if there is concomitant valvular disease, and provide clues to cardiac and central venous pressures. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • In crude terms, this measurement compares left and right cardiac activity and calculates preload and afterload flow and pressures which, theoretically, can be stabilized or adjusted with drugs to either constrict or dilate the vessels (to raise or lower, respectively, the pressure of blood flowing to the lungs), in order to maximize oxygen for delivery to the body tissues. (wikipedia.org)
  • bypass surgery
  • Blood gases may also be ordered when someone has head or neck trauma, which may affect breathing, and when someone is undergoing prolonged anesthesia - particularly for cardiac bypass surgery or brain surgery - to monitor blood gases during, and for a period after, the procedure. (labcorp.com)
  • vascular
  • Integral to the work leading to the development of the G suit was the perfection of vascular catheterization methods needed to understand the distribution of blood pressure and flow. (wikipedia.org)
  • Systemic vascular resistance is used in calculations of blood pressure, blood flow, and cardiac function. (wikipedia.org)
  • Units for measuring vascular resistance are dyn·s·cm−5, pascal seconds per cubic metre (Pa·s/m³) or, for ease of deriving it by pressure (measured in mmHg) and cardiac output (measured in l/min), it can be given in mmHg·min/l. (wikipedia.org)
  • physiology
  • Infants and children with single ventricle physiology may require a variety of non-cardiac surgeries in which the principles described in this chapter apply, but the focus here will be on the cardiac surgeries. (psychiatryadvisor.com)
  • Cardiac output (CO, also denoted by the symbols Q {\displaystyle Q} and Q ˙ c {\displaystyle {\dot {Q}}_{c}} ), is a term used in cardiac physiology that describes the volume of blood being pumped by the heart, in particular by the left or right ventricle, per unit time. (wikipedia.org)
  • In normal cardiac physiology, the mitral valve opens during left ventricular diastole, to allow blood to flow from the left atrium to the left ventricle. (wikipedia.org)
  • surgery
  • One-time catheterization following surgery may not be necessary if other measures to induce voiding are tried. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Small amounts of air often get into the blood circulation accidentally during surgery and other medical procedures (for example, a bubble entering an intravenous fluid line), but most of these air emboli enter the veins and are stopped at the lungs, and thus a venous air embolism that shows any symptoms is very rare. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1989, after completing general surgery training at the Brigham, and in preparation for cardiac surgery training, Burke spent a year as a research fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, in the Spectroscopy Laboratory, under Michael Stephen Feld, PhD. Burke developed the idea that Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy could be used to diagnose rejection in transplanted cardiac tissue, thereby avoiding the need for traumatic biopsies. (wikipedia.org)
  • Burke was selected for cardiac surgery training at the Brigham and Women's Hospital, under program director Lawrence H. Cohn. (wikipedia.org)
  • He spent six months as the Chief Resident in Pediatric Cardiac Surgery under Professor Aldo Castaneda, and attending surgeons, Richard Jonas, John Mayer, and Frank Hanley. (wikipedia.org)
  • When Hanley accepted the position of Chief of Pediatric Cardiac Surgery at the University of California, San Francisco, Burke was offered his position, and he joined the Children's Hospital Boston attending staff in 1992, becoming an Instructor in Surgery at the Harvard Medical School. (wikipedia.org)
  • decrease
  • Of 7 human investigations providing CDP cardiac ejection fraction results relative to postanesthesia induction values, 4 demonstrate a decrease, 38,42,49,57 and 3 show no change. (blogs.com)
  • tricuspid
  • The " v " wave corresponds to Venous filling when the tricuspid valve is closed and venous pressure increases from venous return - this occurs during and following the carotid pulse. (wikipedia.org)
  • arrest
  • Nitrous oxide is combustible and has been associated with sudden cardiac arrest. (blogs.com)
  • The literature suggests that an increase in heart rate is relatively common and that cardiac dysrhythmias or cardiac arrest may occur, but are unlikely. (blogs.com)
  • Heart failure is not the same as myocardial infarction (in which part of the heart muscle dies) or cardiac arrest (in which blood flow stops altogether). (wikipedia.org)
  • Periods of poor blood flow may be due to cardiac arrest or the blockage of an artery by a clot as in the case of a stroke. (wikipedia.org)
  • Targeted temperature management improves survival and brain function following resuscitation from cardiac arrest. (wikipedia.org)
  • Evidence supports its use following certain types of cardiac arrest in which an individual does not regain consciousness. (wikipedia.org)
  • Targeted temperature management may be used in the following conditions: The 2013 ILCOR and 2010 American Heart Association guidelines support the use of cooling following resuscitation from cardiac arrest. (wikipedia.org)
  • These recommendations were largely based on two trials from 2002 which showed improved survival and brain function when cooled to 32-34 °C (90-93 °F) after cardiac arrest. (wikipedia.org)
  • it appears cooling is effective because it prevents fever, a common complication seen after cardiac arrest. (wikipedia.org)
  • pacemaker
  • Sometimes, depending on the cause, an implanted device such as a pacemaker or an implantable cardiac defibrillator may be recommended. (wikipedia.org)
  • acute
  • it is used intravenously for the treatment of ventricular arrhythmias (for acute myocardial infarction, digoxin poisoning, cardioversion, or cardiac catheterization) if amiodarone is not available or contraindicated. (wikipedia.org)
  • ischemia
  • Her serial ECG's showed dynamic changes (initial bradycardia, PR prolongation followed by ST segment elevation in inferior leads) which was indicative of cardiac ischemia. (jscimedcentral.com)
  • congestion
  • The patient may develop a venous thrombosis characterized by painful swelling of a limb ( Figure 1 ) or signs of venous congestion of the head and neck with swelling and pain in the head and neck. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • patients
  • usually to facilitate the provision of a higher level or more specialized field of care but also to transfer patients from a specialized facility to a local hospital or nursing home when they no longer require the services of that specialized hospital, such as following successful cardiac catheterization due to a heart attack. (wikipedia.org)
  • systemic
  • Breathing gas introduced into the venous system of the lungs due to pulmonary barotrauma will not be trapped in the alveolar capillaries, and will consequently be circulated to the rest of the body through the systemic arteries, with a high risk of embolism. (wikipedia.org)
  • Inert gas bubbles arising from decompression are generally formed in the venous side of the systemic circulation, where inert gas concentrations are highest, these bubbles are generally trapped in the capillaries of the lungs where they will usually be eliminated without causing symptoms. (wikipedia.org)
  • anaesthesia
  • Altogether, the beneficial haemodynamic profile combined with its putative organ-protective properties could render xenon an attractive option for anaesthesia of children undergoing cardiac catheterization. (springer.com)
  • In a phase-II, mono-centre, prospective, single-blind, randomised, controlled study, we will test the hypothesis that the administration of 50% xenon as an adjuvant to general anaesthesia with sevoflurane in children undergoing elective cardiac catheterization is safe and feasible. (springer.com)
  • output
  • quantium Medical Cardiac Output (qCO) uses impedance cardiography in a simple, continuous, and non-invasive way to estimate the Cardiac output (CO) and other hemodynamic parameters such as the Stroke Volume (SV) and Cardiac index (CI). (wikipedia.org)
  • The assessment of Cardiac Output (CO) is important because it reveals the main cardiac function: the supply of blood to tissues. (wikipedia.org)
  • Values for cardiac output are usually denoted as L/min. (wikipedia.org)
  • Because cardiac output is related to the quantity of blood delivered to various parts of the body, it is an important indicator of how efficiently the heart can meet the body's demands for perfusion. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cardiac output is a global blood flow parameter of interest in hæmodynamics, the study of the flow of blood. (wikipedia.org)
  • The factors affecting stroke volume and heart rate also affect cardiac output. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is especially important during mechanical ventilation, in which cardiac output can vary by up to 50%[citation needed] across a single respiratory cycle. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cardiac output should therefore be measured at evenly spaced points over a single cycle or averaged over several cycles. (wikipedia.org)
  • The result is then multiplied by the heart rate (HR) to obtain cardiac output. (wikipedia.org)
  • Play media Heart failure is a physiological state in which cardiac output is insufficient to meet the needs of the body and lungs. (wikipedia.org)
  • High-output heart failure can occur when there is an increased cardiac output. (wikipedia.org)
  • Justification for its continued use rests on a large body of clinical experience, disadvantages of other cardiac output monitoring systems, its ability to accurately measure pulmonary artery pressure, and the potential to use the catheter as a direct conduit for drug administration into the pulmonary artery. (wikipedia.org)
  • This gradient may be increased by increases in the heart rate or cardiac output. (wikipedia.org)
  • carotid
  • The JVP and carotid pulse can be differentiated several ways: multiphasic - the JVP "beats" twice (in quick succession) in the cardiac cycle. (wikipedia.org)
  • pressure
  • BNP (brain natriuretic peptide) or pro-BNP levels are often elevated due to increased cardiac pressure/volume and increased myocardial wall stress. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • Physiologically, this is a consequence of the Frank-Starling mechanism as inspiration decreases the thoracic pressure and increases blood movement into the heart (venous return), which a healthy heart moves into the pulmonary circulation. (wikipedia.org)
  • The water-filled, pulsatile pressure suits were developed to effect venous return. (wikipedia.org)
  • clinical
  • While far removed from actual clinical application, the possibility of catheter-free access to the central venous circulation offers great potential for ease of care and a lessened infection rate of catheter-related sepsis. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Temporary cardiac pacing in the critical care setting can be a lifesaving intervention in a number of clinical situations. (biomedsearch.com)
  • stroke
  • Specialized hospitals that provide higher levels of care may include services such as neonatal intensive care (NICU), pediatric intensive care (PICU), state regional burn centres, specialized care for spinal injury and/or neurosurgery, regional stroke centers, specialized cardiac care (Cardiac catheterization), and specialized/regional trauma care. (wikipedia.org)