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  • basal cell
  • Squamous cell carcinoma also tends to grow more quickly and can, unlike basal cell, spread to other parts of the body, making it more dangerous than basal cell carcinoma . (healthcentral.com)
  • The greatest risk factor is high total exposure to ultraviolet radiation from the Sun. Other risks include prior scars, chronic wounds, actinic keratosis, lighter skin, Bowen's disease, arsenic exposure, radiation therapy, poor immune system function, previous basal cell carcinoma, and HPV infection. (wikipedia.org)
  • Unlike basal-cell carcinomas, SCCs carry a significant risk of metastasis, often spreading to local nerves or the lymph nodes, During its earliest stages, it is sometimes known as Bowen's disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • While the risk of developing all skin cancers increases with these medications, this effect is particularly severe for SCC, with hazard ratios as high as 250 being reported, versus 40 for basal cell carcinoma. (wikipedia.org)
  • metaplasia
  • Another possible way of SCTC development can be through the squamous metaplasia of cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, that theory is also controversial, since the Hashimoto's thyroiditis and chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis (neoplasms to be showed squamous metaplasia) are not associated with SCTC. (wikipedia.org)
  • progression
  • In a recent study, it has also been shown that the deletion or severe down-regulation of a gene titled Tpl2 (tumor progression locus 2) may be involved in the progression of normal keratinocytes into becoming squamous cell carcinoma. (wikipedia.org)
  • epidermal
  • Several studies have found an association between the presence of Bovine papillomavirus-1 and 2 and associated viral growth proteins in skin cells with sarcoid formation, but the exact mechanism that controls or induces epidermal proliferation remains unknown. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bowen's
  • Around 1/3 progress to squamous cell carcinoma 2) Erythroplasia of Queyrat, a variation of Bowen's disease, presenting as erythroplakia on the glans 3) Bowenoid papulosis, which histologically resembles Bowen disease, but presents as reddish papules. (wikipedia.org)
  • histologically
  • Histologically, sarcoids are composed of fibroblasts (collagen producing cells) that invade and proliferate within the dermis and sometimes the subcutaneous tissue but do not readily metastasize to other organs. (wikipedia.org)
  • tumors
  • Although medical resection with adjuvant chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy are accustomed to treat breast tumors, regular cells tolerance, development of metastases, and natural tumor resistance to radiation or chemotherapy can hinder an effective outcome. (biomasswars.com)
  • Their cells do not normally spread to adjacent tissue and involve other organs in the way that potentially deadly malignant tumors do. (kerryblues.org)
  • Although mast cell tumors appear most often in golden retrievers and Labrador retrievers, the condition is by no means associated only with those breeds. (kerryblues.org)
  • ERG may also detect or confirm vascular invasion and assess microvessel density in tumors other than prostatic carcinomas or cells of endothelial origin, as 9FY stains blood and lymphatic endothelial cells. (biocare.net)
  • epithelial
  • Genital warts, which are a form of benign tumor of epithelial cells, are also caused by various strains of HPV. (wikipedia.org)
  • These complexes, which help regulate cell growth in addition to creating and maintaining epithelial layers, are known as adherens junctions and they typically include at least cadherin, β-catenin, and α-catenin. (wikipedia.org)
  • The primary mechanical role of catenins is connecting cadherins to actin filaments, specifically in these adhesion junctions of epithelial cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • First of all, by binding to cadherin receptor intracellular cytoplasmic tail domains, it can act as an integral component of a protein complex in adherens junctions that helps cells maintain epithelial layers. (wikipedia.org)
  • For instance, when an epithelial layer is complete and the adherens junctions indicate that the cell is surrounded, β-catenin may play a role in telling the cell to stop proliferating, as there is no room for more cells in the area. (wikipedia.org)
  • Several cell types or tissues, e.g. osteoblasts, chondrocytes, cardiac tissue, gastrointestinal smooth muscle cells, and epithelial cells of some tissues normally do not express LECT2 but do so under a variety of disease conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • receptor
  • It targets the programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) receptor of lymphocytes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pembrolizumab is an immunoglobulin G4, with a variable region against the human programmed cell death 1 receptor, a humanized mouse monoclonal [228-L-proline(H10-S>P)]γ4 heavy chain (134-218') disulfide and a humanized mouse monoclonal κ light chain dimer (226-226:229-229)-bisdisulfide. (wikipedia.org)
  • A signature of this type of receptor is the distinct pattern of how the receptor molecule spans the cell membrane seven times. (wikipedia.org)
  • tissue
  • This galectin is strongly overexpressed in Hodgkin's disease tissue and it might participate in the interaction between the H&RS cells with their surrounding cells and might thus play a role in the pathogenesis of this disease and/or its consistently associated immunodeficiency. (wikipedia.org)
  • Prostate
  • Based on the 99.9% specificity of the 9FY, the utilization of this antibody may aid in diagnosis of prostate biopsies with inconclusive results to ascertain the diagnosis of prostatic carcinoma. (biocare.net)
  • It is helpful in minute foci of prostatic acinar carcinoma in prostate biopsy specimens. (biocare.net)
  • protein
  • Leukocyte cell-derived chemotaxin-2 (LECT2) is a protein first described in 1996 as a chemotactic factor for neutrophils, i.e. it stimulated human neutrophils to move directionally in an in vitro assay system. (wikipedia.org)
  • Subsequent studies have defined LECT2 as a hepatokine, i.e. a substance made and released into the circulation by liver hepatocyte cells that regulates the function of other cells: it is a hepatocyte-derived, hormone-like, signaling protein. (wikipedia.org)
  • The protein has been localized to the endoplasmic reticulum of T-cells and is a candidate linker protein in T-cell signal transduction. (wikipedia.org)
  • growth
  • It is due to the abnormal growth of cells that have the ability to invade or spread to other parts of the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • While less attention is directed at α-catenin in studies involving cell adhesion, it is nonetheless an important player in cellular organization, function and growth. (wikipedia.org)
  • Origin
  • Esthesioneuroblastoma is of neurocrest origin, arising from olfactory sensory cells in the olfactory epithelium. (wikipedia.org)
  • canine
  • Effects of hormones and cytokines on stimulation of adenylate cyclase and intracellular calcium concentration in human and canine periodontal ligament cells. (dentisty.org)
  • immune system
  • Mast cells are essentially white blood cells, important immune cells whose ingredients include histamine (a chemical that is released by the immune system as part of an allergic reaction) and heparin (an anticoagulant substance). (kerryblues.org)
  • CB2 receptors are structurally different (the sequence similarity between the two subtypes of receptors is 44%), found only on cells of the immune system, and seems to function similarly to its CB1 counterpart. (wikipedia.org)