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  • growth
  • In this study, we aimed to explore the effect of BRD4 inhibition by JQ1 on in vitro cell growth, migration and invasion of salivary adenoid cystic carcinoma (SACC). (scielo.cl)
  • recurrent
  • Surgical excision versus Mohs' micrographic surgery for primary and recurrent basal-cell carcinoma of the face: a prospective randomised controlled trial with 5-years' follow-up," The Lancet Oncology , vol. 9, no. 12, pp. 1149-1156, 2008. (hindawi.com)
  • actinic
  • It is often difficult to visually distinguish basal-cell cancer from acne scar, actinic elastosis, and recent cryodestruction inflammation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mohs
  • If cancer is present in any area of the excised tissue, the procedure is repeated only on the body area where those cancer cells were identified (the tissue mapping allows the Mohs surgeon to pinpoint this area of the body), until the last excised layer viewed microscopically is cancer-free. (skincancer.org)
  • Mohs procedure is also used for squamous cell carcinoma, but with a lower cure rate. (wikipedia.org)
  • After each surgical removal of tissue, the specimen is processed, cut on the cryostat and placed on slides, stained with H&E and then read by the Mohs surgeon/pathologist who examines the sections for cancerous cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Removal
  • During the surgery, after each removal of tissue and while the patient waits, the tissue is examined for cancer cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • cancer
  • The doctor then uses a microscope to examine the area for any remaining cancer cells. (healthcentral.com)
  • Systemic therapy travels through the bloodstream to reach and destroy cancer cells all over the body. (cancer.ca)
  • Then the area is treated with an electrical current to destroy any remaining cancer cells. (cancer.ca)
  • It uses a light-sensitive drug (photosensitizer) and a special type of light to destroy cancer cells. (cancer.ca)
  • It uses high-energy rays or particles to destroy cancer cells. (cancer.ca)
  • Targeted therapy uses drugs to target specific molecules (such as proteins) on or inside cancer cells to stop the growth and spread of cancer cells. (cancer.ca)
  • In some areas of the body, it is repeated a few times to help assure that all cancer cells are eliminated. (skincancer.org)
  • Basal-cell cancer grows slowly and can damage the tissue around it but is unlikely to spread to distant areas or result in death. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, superficial basal-cell cancer can present as a red patch similar to eczema. (wikipedia.org)
  • By degrading these proteins, cancer cells are able to breach the ECM and escape. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cancer cells often opportunistically switch between different kinds of motion. (wikipedia.org)
  • miR-638 levels are significantly downregulated in gastric cancer cell lines, along with deregulation of 23 other miRNAs. (wikipedia.org)
  • growth
  • In this study, we aimed to explore the effect of BRD4 inhibition by JQ1 on in vitro cell growth, migration and invasion of salivary adenoid cystic carcinoma (SACC). (scielo.cl)
  • genes
  • Mutations of the GLI2 gene are associated with several phenotypes including Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome, Pallister-Hall syndrome, preaxial polydactyly type IV, postaxial polydactyly types A1 and B. In human keratinocytes Gli2 activation upregulates a number of genes involved in cell cycle progression including E2F1, CCND1, CDC2 and CDC45L. (wikipedia.org)
  • These factors act, at least partly, by changing the genes of a cell. (wikipedia.org)
  • first described a sequence tag corresponding to the NEDD9 3′ untranslated region based on the cloning of a group of genes predominantly expressed in the brain of embryonic, but not adult mice, a group of genes designated neural precursor cell expressed, developmentally down-regulated. (wikipedia.org)
  • overexpressed a human cDNA library in S. cerevisiae, and screened for genes that simultaneously affected cell cycle and cell polarity controls, inducing a filamentous yeast budding phenotype, and thus identified the HEF1 protein (Human Enhancer of Filamentation 1). (wikipedia.org)
  • protein
  • Pasireotide works by binding to a protein called somatostatin receptor, which is expressed in many tissues throughout the body including thyroid cancer cells. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The protein encoded by this gene plays a role in the determination of cell fates during development. (wikipedia.org)
  • The numb gene protein product controls binary cell fate decisions in the peripheral and central nervous systems of both invertebrates and mammals during neurogenesis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Numb protein signaling plays a key role in binary cell fate decisions following asymmetric cell divisions. (wikipedia.org)
  • In both invertebrates and mammals, Numb is localized using the Pins/GαI complex and the PAR complex of Bazooka (Par3 in mammals), Par6, and aPKC (atypical protein kinase C). In the sensory organ precursor (SOP) cell, the PAR proteins localize to the posterior pole of the cell, and the Pins/GαI complex is localized to the anterior pole of the cell. (wikipedia.org)
  • Synthesized as a membrane-bound protein, the neprilysin ectodomain is released into the extracellular domain after it has been transported from the Golgi apparatus to the cell surface. (wikipedia.org)
  • This protein is present on leukemic cells of pre-B phenotype, which represent 85% of cases of ALL. (wikipedia.org)
  • Neural precursor cell expressed developmentally down-regulated protein 9 (NEDD-9) is a protein that in humans is encoded by the NEDD9 gene. (wikipedia.org)
  • cloned the gene encoding a protein hyperphosphorylated following ligation of β1-integrins in T cells and hypothesized to play a role in the process of T cell costimulation, designating this gene Cas-L (Crk-associated substrate-related protein, Lymphocyte type). (wikipedia.org)
  • NEDD9 is a noncatalytic scaffolding protein that contains docking sites for proteins involved in multiple signal transduction pathways, regulating magnitude and duration of cell signaling cascades The overall structure of NEDD9 is represented graphically in Figure 1. (wikipedia.org)
  • consists
  • In baboon skeletal muscle, which consists of fully differentiated post-mitotic cells, less than 3% of myonuclei contain damaged telomeres and this percentage does not increase with age. (wikipedia.org)
  • tissue
  • They include: Cell growth and division absent the proper signals Continuous growth and division even given contrary signals Avoidance of programmed cell death Limitless number of cell divisions Promoting blood vessel construction Invasion of tissue and formation of metastases The progression from normal cells to cells that can form a detectable mass to outright cancer involves multiple steps known as malignant progression. (wikipedia.org)
  • In contrast, invasive carcinoma invades the surrounding tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • Grading focuses on the appearance of the breast cancer cells compared to the appearance of normal breast tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • cancer cells
  • It works by preventing cancer cells from multiplying and it also makes them more likely to die from the treatment. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • MAJOR CANCER BREAKTHROUGH: Scientists Find Plant That Kills 98% Of Cancer Cells In Just 16 Hours! (unews.top)
  • The cancer cells may spread from the prostate to other area of the body, particularly the bones and lymph nodes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Beyond unicellular organisms) Telomerase is active in normal stem cells and most cancer cells, but is normally absent from, or at very low levels in, most somatic cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • in other types, most notably lung cancers, neprilysin is downregulated, and thus unable to modulate the pro-growth autocrine signaling of cancer cells via secreted peptides such as mammalian homologs related to bombesin. (wikipedia.org)
  • Breast cancer cells may or may not have many different types of receptors, the three most important in the present classification being: estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and HER2/neu. (wikipedia.org)
  • divisions
  • In normal circumstances, absent telomerase, if a cell divides recursively, at some point the progeny reach their Hayflick limit, which is believed to be between 50-70 cell divisions. (wikipedia.org)
  • marker
  • It is also a common acute lymphocytic leukemia antigen that is an important cell surface marker in the diagnosis of human acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). (wikipedia.org)
  • progenitor
  • Truly endothelial, BOEC are progeny of a transplantable cell that originates in bone marrow, a putative endothelial progenitor. (jci.org)
  • During cell division, Numb is asymmetrically localized to one end of the progenitor cell and subsequently segregates to only one daughter cell where it intrinsically determines cell fate. (wikipedia.org)
  • abnormal
  • However, loss of Gli3 leads to abnormal patterning and loss of Gli2 affects the development of ventral cell types, most significantly in the floor plate. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cancer is a group of diseases involving abnormal cell growth with the potential to invade or spread to other parts of the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cancers are a large family of diseases that involve abnormal cell growth with the potential to invade or spread to other parts of the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • telomerase
  • The role of telomeres and telomerase in cell aging and cancer was established by scientists at biotechnology company Geron with the cloning of the RNA and catalytic components of human telomerase and the development of a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based assay for telomerase activity called the TRAP assay, which surveys telomerase activity in multiple types of cancer. (wikipedia.org)
  • Telomerase replaces short bits of DNA known as telomeres, which are otherwise shortened when a cell divides via mitosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Telomerase allows each offspring to replace the lost bit of DNA allowing the cell line to divide without ever reaching the limit. (wikipedia.org)
  • Embryonic stem cells express telomerase, which allows them to divide repeatedly and form the individual. (wikipedia.org)
  • poorly
  • Pathologists describe cells as well differentiated (low-grade), moderately differentiated (intermediate-grade), and poorly differentiated (high-grade) as the cells progressively lose the features seen in normal breast cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • proteins
  • Gli family zinc finger proteins are mediators of Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling and they are implicated as potent oncogenes in the embryonal carcinoma cell. (wikipedia.org)
  • localizes
  • During neurogenesis, Numb localizes to one side of the mother cell such that it is distributed selectively to one daughter cell. (wikipedia.org)
  • immune
  • Together, the results of this study lay the groundwork for future studies to explore the role of DNA replication in immune cell generation and function. (jci.org)
  • Cannabis cofactor compounds have also been linked to lowering body temperature, modulating immune functioning, and cell protection. (wikipedia.org)
  • CB2 receptors are structurally different (the sequence similarity between the two subtypes of receptors is 44%), found only on cells of the immune system, and seems to function similarly to its CB1 counterpart. (wikipedia.org)
  • factors
  • These factors vary by cell type and gestational age and can be affected by changes to the in utero environment and maternal immunity. (jci.org)
  • NEDD9 is induced by Wnt signaling in colon cancer, based on binding to T-cell factor (TCF) factors in the promoter region. (wikipedia.org)
  • peripheral
  • In the mid-1990s, my research group began to devise a method to establish endothelial cell cultures from human peripheral blood, with an ultimate goal of examining interindividual heterogeneity of endothelial biology. (jci.org)
  • receptors
  • The location of cannabinoid receptors exists on the cell membrane, and both outside (extracellularly) and inside (intracellularly) the cell membrane. (wikipedia.org)
  • CB2 receptors are most commonly prevalent on B-cells, natural killer cells, and monocytes, but can also be found on polymorphonuclear neutrophil cells, T8 cells, and T4 cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chemical messengers such as hormones bind to receptors, and this causes changes in the cell. (wikipedia.org)
  • type
  • We used human glioma lines containing BRAF V600E (adult high-grade: AM-38, DBTRG, PLGG: BT40), or wild-type BRAF (pediatric high-grade: SF188, SF9427, SF8628) and isogenic systems of KIAA1549:BRAF -expressing NIH/3T3 cells and BRAF V600E -expressing murine brain cells. (aacrjournals.org)
  • natural kille
  • Hematopoetic progenitors expressing CD10 are considered "common lymphoid progenitors", which means they can differentiate into T, B or natural killer cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • usually
  • A malignant neoplasm of melanin-pigmented cells (melanocytes), usually developing from a nevus and consisting of black masses of cells with a marked tendency to metastasize . (in.gov)
  • death
  • Mechanistic studies showed that the synergistic cell death was not due to an increase in viral replication but occurred through an enhancement of apoptotic cell death. (biomedcentral.com)
  • known
  • Clear cell acanthoma (also known as "Acanthome cellules claires of Degos and Civatte," "Degos acanthoma," and "Pale cell acanthoma") is a benign clinical and histological lesion initially described as neoplastic, which some authors now regard as a reactive dermatosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • function
  • Normal cells in an organ like the breast become differentiated, meaning that they take on specific shapes and forms that reflect their function as part of that organ. (wikipedia.org)
  • blood
  • The initial work, published in the JCI in 2000, described the method enabling successful attainment of blood outgrowth endothelial cells (BOEC). (jci.org)