• one's
  • Metacognition is "cognition about cognition", "thinking about thinking", "knowing about knowing", becoming "aware of one's awareness" and higher-order thinking skills. (wikipedia.org)
  • Following commentators like Dharmottara, who define it as meaning that a cognition is able to lead to the obtaining of one's desired object, some modern scholars such as Jose I. Cabezon have interpreted DharmakÄ«rti as defending a form of Pragmatism. (wikipedia.org)
  • cognitive assess
  • The Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB), originally developed at the University of Cambridge in the 1980s but now provided in a commercial capacity by Cambridge Cognition, is a computer-based cognitive assessment system consisting of a battery of neuropsychological tests, administered to subjects using a touch screen computer. (wikipedia.org)
  • researchers
  • This led researchers from Duke University to wonder: is improving exercise capacity -by whatever means - necessary and sufficient to boost neurocognitive function? (wordpress.com)
  • Similarly, in an object placement task in which researchers minutely moved one of two objects, low capacity runners could not identify the moved one after an hour's delay, though they managed if the wait was only a minute. (wordpress.com)
  • But what if, unbeknownst to researchers, high capacity runners were maniacally jumping around everyday in their home cages? (wordpress.com)
  • This prospect is raised by a recent finding by researchers at University College London that normal people who take drugs commonly prescribed for the treatment of disease and dysfunction (Parkinson's and depression) have their moral cognition altered - in a more selfish and a less selfish direction, respectively. (theconversation.com)
  • researcher
  • The term 'steering cognition' was coined by the researcher Simon P. Walker who discovered consistent, replicable patterns of attention and corresponding response through repeated cognitive tests between 2000 and 2015, in studies with over 15,000 individuals. (wikipedia.org)
  • human
  • Research on the development of human infants has revealed remarkable capacities in recent years. (target.com)
  • These results parallel that of a human study , in which increased lung capacity after training correlated with better performance on a modified pattern separation task (although understandably they did not show enhanced adult neurogenesis, so it's hard to attribute behavioural output to increased new neurons per se ). (wordpress.com)
  • The $4.9 million, three-year grant from the John Templeton Foundation is the largest of its type for human origins research, and will support 11 linked investigations of where, when, and how unique human capacities for complex cognition, cumulative culture, and large-scale cooperation emerged. (wikipedia.org)
  • The importance of steering cognition lies in its explanation of human behaviours which lead to either risks or advantages for individuals and groups. (wikipedia.org)
  • tasks
  • Steering cognition has been shown to depend on our ability to mental simulate or imagine ourselves performing tasks and functions. (wikipedia.org)
  • DCog is a useful approach for (re)designing the technologically mediated social aspects of cognition by putting emphasis on the individual and his/her environment, and the media channels with which people interact, either in order to communicate with each other, or socially coordinate to perform complex tasks. (wikipedia.org)
  • He considered that distributed cognition draws from the information processing metaphor of cognitive science where a system is considered in terms of its inputs and outputs and tasks are decomposed into a problem space (Perry, 1998). (wikipedia.org)
  • contributions
  • According to Zhang & Norman (1994), the distributed cognition approach has three key components: Embodiment of information that is embedded in representations of interaction Coordination of enaction among embodied agents Ecological contributions to a cognitive ecosystem 'Dcog' studies the "propagation of representational states across media" (Rogers and Ellis, ibid. (wikipedia.org)
  • neurons
  • In this article, they argue that since there is no evidence for the presence of neurons in plants, the idea of plant neurobiology and cognition is unfounded and needs to be redefined. (wikipedia.org)
  • mental health
  • Poorly regulated steering cognition has been shown to correlate strongly with increased mental health and welfare risks during adolescence. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Sunday Times reported in October 2015 that a growing number of schools in the UK, including independent schools Monkton Combe School and Wellington College, are now using a technology, AS Tracking, developed by Mind.World to measure student steering cognition as an 'early warning system' for welfare and mental health risks. (wikipedia.org)
  • research
  • He conducts his research under the auspices of the Institute for Logic, Language and Computation (ILLC), and the University of Amsterdam's Brain and Cognition (ABC) center. (wikipedia.org)
  • social
  • Together, Walker and Walker conjecture that steering cognition is a central mechanism by which people self-regulate their cognitive, emotional and social states. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are some authors, including Meredith Belbin, who claim that people with more flexible steering cognition have advantages in jobs which require greater social or cognitive dexterity because of improved social relating and leadership skills. (wikipedia.org)
  • A large 2014 study showed that boarding school education resulted in better pupil ability to regulate steering cognition across social situations than day school education. (wikipedia.org)
  • Thomas's London Day Schools are using a curriculum, Footprints, to train pupils as young as eight to improve their steering cognition as part of their social and emotional development. (wikipedia.org)
  • John Milton Roberts thought that social organization could be seen as cognition through a community (Roberts 1964). (wikipedia.org)
  • Cognition is said to be "socially distributed" when it is applied to demonstrate how interpersonal processes can be used to coordinate activity within a social group. (wikipedia.org)
  • culture
  • Daniel L. Schwartz (1978) proposed a distribution of cognition through culture and the distribution of beliefs across the members of a society. (wikipedia.org)
  • approach
  • While plant "neurobiology" focuses on the physiological study of plants, modern plant cognition primarily applies a behavioural/ecological approach. (wikipedia.org)
  • Science
  • He is professor of Music Cognition at both the Faculty of Humanities and the Faculty of Science of the University of Amsterdam (UvA). (wikipedia.org)
  • Wat we weten over het luisteren naar muziek (Nieuw Amsterdam, 2009/2012), published in English as Musical Cognition: A Science of Listening (Transaction Publishers, 2011/2013), and introduced at the 2011 edition of TEDxAmsterdam. (wikipedia.org)
  • In her capacity as a professor she teaches graduate courses related to cognition and science education. (wikipedia.org)
  • group
  • Studies have shown that environmental biasing of our steering cognition can contribute to non-conscious in-group behaviours, e.g. an increased likelihood of groupthink or emotional contagion. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2007, he was appointed Associate Professor in Music Cognition at the University of Amsterdam's Musicology capacity group. (wikipedia.org)
  • These representation-based frameworks consider distributed cognition as "a cognitive system whose structures and processes are distributed between internal and external representations, across a group of individuals, and across space and time" (Zhang and Patel, 2006). (wikipedia.org)
  • common
  • The problem generalizes the bi-directional broadcast channel to include a third receiver, a common message, and (partial) message cognition. (diva-portal.org)
  • The study authors caution that we cannot conclude from the finding - that healthy people have their moral cognition modified by common pharmaceuticals - that sufferers from depression or from Parkinson's are also subject to such modification. (theconversation.com)
  • Authors
  • The authors gave five conditions of minimal cognition in living beings, and concluded that 'plants are cognitive in a minimal, embodied sense that also applies to many animals and even bacteria. (wikipedia.org)
  • media
  • Highly critical of the Internet's effect on cognition, the article has been read and debated widely in both the media and the blogosphere. (wikipedia.org)
  • Distributed cognition views a system of cognition as a set of representations propagated through specific media, and models the interchange of information between these representational media. (wikipedia.org)
  • content
  • Mental content is considered to be non-reducible to individual cognition and is more properly understood as off-loaded and extended into the environment, where information is also made available to other agents (Heylighen, Heath, & Overwalle, 2003). (wikipedia.org)
  • specific
  • Walker developed a specific steering cognition test used with more than 11,000 candidates between the ages of eight and 60 between 2002 and 2015. (wikipedia.org)
  • channel
  • Therefore, people's maximum performance on one-dimensional absolute judgement can be characterized as an information channel capacity with approximately 2 to 3 bits of information, which corresponds to the ability to distinguish between four and eight alternatives. (wikipedia.org)
  • ability
  • The ability to regulate steering cognition has been shown to account for up to 15% of academic outcomes at secondary school not accounted for by IQ. (wikipedia.org)
  • benefits
  • Running-improved aerobic capacity seems to be the crux to exercise-induced brain benefits. (wordpress.com)
  • citation needed] In 1998, Mark Perry from Brunel University London explored the problems and the benefits brought by distributed cognition to "understanding the organisation of information within its contexts. (wikipedia.org)
  • Internet
  • and, at the online scientific magazine Edge, several argued[citation needed] that it was ultimately the responsibility of individuals to monitor their Internet usage so that it does not impact their cognition. (wikipedia.org)
  • questions
  • It is carried out in the manner of an informal enquiry, using a combination of open and closed questions, supplemented by structured tests to assess cognition. (wikipedia.org)
  • highly
  • is a magazine article by technology writer Nicholas G. Carr, and is highly critical of the Internet's effect on cognition. (wikipedia.org)