• calibrate
  • Though the ISF popularized the value of professional video calibration, in recent years the equipment necessary to carry out the necessary tasks has become inexpensive enough that enthusiasts and prosumers have been empowered to calibrate their own displays. (wikipedia.org)
  • Laboratory standard microphones calibrated using this method are used in-turn to calibrate other microphones using comparison calibration techniques ('secondary calibration'), referencing the output of the 'test' microphone against that of the reference laboratory standard microphone. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Corona Satellite Calibration Targets are 272 concrete markers in and around Casa Grande, Arizona that helped to calibrate camera photos on the Corona spy satellite program. (wikipedia.org)
  • Remaining Corona Satellite Calibration Targets - Google map of 145 remaining markers which formed a grid, used from 1959 to 1972 to calibrate the Corona spy satellite cameras, by Andrei Conovaloff, 2018. (wikipedia.org)
  • sensor
  • Spectral data acquired by satellite sensors are influenced by a number of factors, such as atmospheric absorption and scattering, sensor-target-illumination geometry, sensor calibration, and image data processing procedures, which tend to change through times (Teillet, 1986). (wikipedia.org)
  • In more general use, a calibration curve is a curve or table for a measuring instrument which measures some parameter indirectly, giving values for the desired quantity as a function of values of sensor output. (wikipedia.org)
  • 9001
  • Our comprehensive certification and calibration services ensure that your products meet all relevant regulations, and compliance is recognised with the ISO 9001 certificate, valid for 12 months. (intertek.com)
  • The National Calibration Reference Centre (NCRC) was registered to ISO 9001:2000 by the Canadian General Services Board (CGSB) in December 2003. (wikipedia.org)
  • process
  • In personal development terms, calibration is the process of progressively refining your thoughts, attitudes, and behaviors until you shift your equilibrium to the point where you can consistently achieve the results you desire. (stevepavlina.com)
  • In the field of social dynamics, calibration is the process of learning how to meet new people, initiate conversations, keep conversations going, make new friends, get dates (second meetings), and basically achieve positive social interactions. (stevepavlina.com)
  • This definition states that the calibration process is purely a comparison, but introduces the concept of measurement uncertainty in relating the accuracies of the device under test and the standard. (wikipedia.org)
  • Besides the calibration of the robot, the calibration of its tools and the workpieces it works with (the so-called cell calibration) can minimize occurring inaccuracies and improve process security. (wikipedia.org)
  • Thus "calibration" can mean A reverse process to regression, where instead of a future dependent variable being predicted from known explanatory variables, a known observation of the dependent variables is used to predict a corresponding explanatory variable. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the special effects industry, camera auto-calibration is often part of the "Match Moving" process where a synthetic camera trajectory and intrinsic projection model are solved to reproject synthetic content into video. (wikipedia.org)
  • main
  • There are two main uses of the term calibration in statistics that denote special types of statistical inference problems. (wikipedia.org)
  • The main goals behind the implementation of the OTFC system are to take advantage of better calibration files and the much smaller storage area required if only raw files are kept in the archives. (wikipedia.org)
  • standard
  • These could include the National Physical Laboratory in the UK, PTB in Germany, NIST in the USA and the National Measurement Institute, Australia, where the reciprocity calibration (see below) is the internationally recognised means of realising the primary standard. (wikipedia.org)
  • Reciprocity calibration is currently the favoured primary standard for calibration of measurement microphones. (wikipedia.org)
  • In addition to having an in-house quality assurance program, Canadian Internal Dosimetry Services are required by the nuclear regulator, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC), through its Regulatory Standard S-106: "Technical and Quality Assurance Standard for Dosimetry Services in Canada", to undergo independent testing by participating in the intercomparison programs provided by the National Calibration Reference Center for Bioassay and In Vivo Monitoring (NCRC). (wikipedia.org)
  • technical
  • Whenever this does happen, it must be in writing and authorized by a manager with the technical assistance of a calibration technician. (wikipedia.org)
  • NABL is an autonomous society providing Accreditation (Recognition) of Technical competence of a testing, calibration, medical laboratory & Proficiency testing provider (PTP) & Reference Material Producer (RMP) for a specific scope following IEC/ISO17025:2005, ISO 15189:2012, IEC/ISO 17043:2010 & IEC/ISO 17034:2016 Standards. (wikipedia.org)
  • provide
  • This page is updated as the instrument teams provide updated and revised calibration files and software. (nasa.gov)
  • Molecules provide no insight into divergence time without a calibration point, and I feel that in too many cases the use of a molecular clock is abused. (bio.net)
  • Quality modern imaging sensors and optics may also provide further prior constraints on the calibration such as zero skew (orthogonal pixel grid) and unity aspect ratio (square pixels). (wikipedia.org)
  • standards
  • It retains engineering authority for all calibrations performed in the PMEL labs throughout the Air Force, and oversees the contractor managed and operated Air Force Primary Standards Lab (AFPSL). (wikipedia.org)
  • program
  • In 2007 it was redesigned as a standalone Windows program based around a new Calibration Optimization and Reporting Environment (CORE) engine. (wikipedia.org)
  • This program offers intercomparison samples for measurement of the following materials in urine: Uranium Tritium Carbon-14 Tritium and Carbon-14 Fission and Activation Products The In Vivo Monitoring intercomparison program is concerned with the calibration of measurement for radioactive isotopes directly in the human body. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Dayton Air Force Depot was given the authority to establish a centralized calibration program. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Dayton Air Force Depot personnel associated with the Air Force calibration program began their moves to the Heath Maintenance Annex in April 1962, and by June, most had been relocated to Heath, Ohio. (wikipedia.org)
  • Next
  • Over the next thirty years many calibration curves were published using a variety of methods and statistical approaches. (wikipedia.org)
  • results
  • Such international arrangements facilitate acceptance of test / calibration results between countries to which MRA partners represent. (wikipedia.org)
  • general
  • In addition, "calibration" is used in statistics with the usual general meaning of calibration. (wikipedia.org)
  • A mathematical theory for general multi-view camera self-calibration was originally demonstrated in 1992 by Olivier Faugeras, QT Luong, and Stephen J. Maybank. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 3D scenes and general motions, each pair of views provides two constraints on the 5 degree-of-freedom calibration. (wikipedia.org)
  • Motions General Motion Purely Rotating Cameras Planar Motion Degenerate Motions Scene Geometry General Scenes with Depth Relief Planar Scenes Weak Perspective and Orthographic Imagers Calibration Priors for Real Sensors Nonlinear optical distortion Using the Kruppa equations. (wikipedia.org)
  • quality
  • The calChecker monitor is regularly inspected by the Quality Control Group in Garching (during normal working hours) and by Paranal Science Operations (every day, at least during daytime calibrations). (eso.org)
  • Video calibration software is software used to improve the quality of commercial video reproduction. (wikipedia.org)
  • Burrows, M.L. "The Quality of the Lincoln Calibration Sphere" (PDF). (wikipedia.org)
  • means
  • This means that three independent calibrations need to be performed: The camera or scanner needs a device-specific calibration to represent the original's estimated colors in an unambiguous way. (wikipedia.org)
  • Calibration in classification means turning transform classifier scores into class membership probabilities. (wikipedia.org)
  • test
  • if you think this approach looks good, I will still need to - incorporate a '-l ../libguile/stack-limit-calibration.scm' into the running of test-suite/tests/* - do ChangeLogs, docs and NEWS. (gnu.org)
  • value
  • The following univariate calibration methods exist for transforming classifier scores into class membership probabilities in the two-class case: Assignment value approach, see Garczarek (2002) Bayes approach, see Bennett (2002) Isotonic regression, see Zadrozny and Elkan (2002) Platt scaling (a form of logistic regression), see Lewis and Gale (1994) and Platt (1999) Bayesian Binning into Quantiles (BBQ) calibration, see Naeini, Cooper, Hauskrecht. (wikipedia.org)
  • form
  • The most common form of calibration aims at adjusting cameras, scanners, monitors and printers for photographic reproduction. (wikipedia.org)
  • service
  • The NCRC provides a national calibration reference service to universities, hospitals, public utilities and private firms in Canada. (wikipedia.org)
  • color
  • citation needed] Color calibration is a requirement for all devices taking an active part of a color-managed workflow. (wikipedia.org)
  • One of the most important factors to consider when dealing with color calibration is having a valid source. (wikipedia.org)
  • If the color measuring source does not match the displays capabilities, the calibration will be ineffective and give false readings. (wikipedia.org)
  • error
  • It would be nice to have multiple calibration points, so one could get an idea about error (a point suggested by David Hillis). (bio.net)