• valence electrons
  • Because of the metallic properties of Calcium, lots of valence electrons free to move around, and the negative attraction of the atoms, Limestone is usually used in buildings. (writework.com)
  • Like the other elements placed in group 2 of the periodic table, calcium has two valence electrons in the outermost s-orbital, which are very easily lost in chemical reactions to form a dipositive ion with the stable electron configuration of a noble gas, in this case argon. (wikipedia.org)
  • aluminium
  • While calcium is a poorer conductor of electricity than copper or aluminium by volume, it is a better conductor than both of them by mass due to its very low density. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cement
  • Calcium compounds on the other hand are very widely used in many industries: for example, they are used in foods and pharmaceuticals for calcium supplementation, in the paper industry as bleaches, in cement, in the manufacture of soaps, and as electrical insulators. (wikipedia.org)
  • radium
  • Calcium is a very ductile silvery metal with a pale yellow tint whose properties are very similar to the heavier elements in its group, strontium, barium, and radium. (wikipedia.org)
  • ions
  • Calcium ions (Ca2+) play a vital role in the physiology and biochemistry of organisms and the cell. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many enzymes require calcium ions as a cofactor, those of the blood-clotting cascade being notable examples. (wikipedia.org)
  • Calcium ions, Ca2+, are released from bone into the bloodstream under controlled conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Calcium is transported through the bloodstream as dissolved ions or bound to proteins such as serum albumin. (wikipedia.org)
  • Calcium storages are intracellular organelles, that constantly accumulate Ca2+ ions and release them during certain cellular events. (wikipedia.org)
  • In vertebrates, calcium ions, like many other ions, are of such vital importance to many physiological processes that its concentration is maintained within specific limits to ensure adequate homeostasis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many enzymes require calcium ions as a cofactor. (wikipedia.org)
  • blocker
  • Cases of cardiac arrest in which it is still recommended include high blood potassium, low blood calcium such as may occur following blood transfusions, and calcium channel blocker overdose. (wikipedia.org)
  • strontium
  • Calcium, strontium, and barium react with water to produce hydrogen gas and their respective hydroxides, and also undergo transmetalation reactions to exchange ligands. (wikipedia.org)
  • finely divided
  • They do this by reacting with finely divided silica and alumina to produce calcium silicates and aluminates, which possess cementing properties. (wikipedia.org)
  • proteins
  • (EN) A fluorescent compound exhibiting a high affinity to calcium-binding proteins (CaBP) is provided. (wipo.int)
  • They make their entrance into the cytoplasm either from outside the cell through the cell membrane via calcium channels (such as calcium-binding proteins or voltage-gated calcium channels), or from some internal calcium storages such as the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. (wikipedia.org)
  • Levels of intracellular calcium are regulated by transport proteins that remove it from the cell. (wikipedia.org)
  • reactive
  • In bulk, calcium is less reactive: it quickly forms a hydration coating in moist air, but below 30% relative humidity it may be stored indefinitely at room temperature. (wikipedia.org)
  • vitamin
  • Without a sufficient amount of vitamin D, the body will not be able to form the hormone calcitriol, which is needed to absorb calcium from the food you eat. (evitamins.com)
  • If there is vitamin D deficiency, the body is forced to take the calcium stored in the bones to use for other essential bodily functions. (evitamins.com)
  • form
  • Do you know that calcium, in its purest form, is actually a metal? (evitamins.com)
  • Since calcium is rarely found in its pure form in nature, it binds with other molecules to form calcium compounds. (evitamins.com)
  • If beryllium did form compounds with an ionization state of +2, it would polarize electron clouds that are near it very strongly and would cause extensive orbital overlap, since beryllium has a high charge density. (wikipedia.org)
  • organic
  • Alizarin or 1,2-dihydroxyanthraquinone (also known as Mordant Red 11 and Turkey Red) is an organic compound with formula C 14H 8O 4 that has been used throughout history as a prominent red dye, principally for dyeing textile fabrics. (wikipedia.org)
  • relatively
  • The intracellular calcium level is kept relatively low with respect to the extracellular fluid, by an approximate magnitude of 12,000-fold. (wikipedia.org)
  • bloodstream
  • The way to overcome this is through the process of bone resorption, in which calcium is liberated into the bloodstream through the action of bone osteoclasts. (wikipedia.org)
  • percent
  • Calcium comprises one to two percent of the total body weight of an adult as a structural component of bones, teeth and soft tissues.Trace amounts of calcium are also present in the human circulatory system. (evitamins.com)
  • high
  • While the pure metal does not have many applications due to its high reactivity, it is often used as an alloying component in small quantities in steelmaking, and calcium-lead alloys are sometimes used in automotive batteries. (wikipedia.org)
  • regulation
  • Calcium is also important for the regulation of nutrient passage through cell mambranes in the body and promotes normal kidney function and sleeping patterns. (evitamins.com)
  • cellular
  • Within a typical cell, the intracellular concentration of ionized calcium is roughly 100 nM, but is subject to increases of 10- to 100-fold during various cellular functions. (wikipedia.org)
  • free
  • Characteristic concentrations of calcium in model organisms are: in E. coli 3mM (bound), 100nM (free), in budding yeast 2mM (bound), in mammalian cell 10-100nM (free) and in blood plasma 2mM. (wikipedia.org)
  • It has been estimated that mitochondrial matrix free calcium concentration rises to the tens of micromolar levels in situ during neuronal activity. (wikipedia.org)
  • water
  • By Le Chatelier's principle and the common ion effect, increasing the concentration of calcium in the water will reduce the dissolution of calcium compounds essential to the structure of concrete. (wikipedia.org)
  • properties
  • Estos resultados permiten concluir que las 1,4- dihidropiridinas I y II poseen acciones antagonistas del calcio vasoselectivas marcadas y este mecanismo está dado por el bloqueo de la corriente de calcio tipo L de manera dependiente del potencial Resumen en inglés The calcium antagonist properties of 2 new 1,4 synthetic dihydropyridines (I and II) were studied. (worldwidescience.org)
  • Calcium chloride's freezing-point depression properties are used to slow the freezing of the caramel in caramel-filled chocolate bars. (wikipedia.org)
  • bone
  • It boosts calcium absorption and helps fight bone loss and other symptoms of calcium deficiency. (evitamins.com)
  • Extracellular calcium is also important for maintaining the potential difference across excitable cell membranes, as well as proper bone formation. (wikipedia.org)