• incidence
  • Even allowing for improvements in detection (i.e., the introduction of routine mammography), there has been a long-term gradual increase in the incidence of breast cancer since the early 1970s, but because of the more effective treatment afforded by such early detection, overall mortality began to decrease by the mid-1990s. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Incidence levels of breast cancer increase rapidly until the age of 50, after which the increase continues at a slower pace (1) . (scielo.br)
  • In scientific terms, there are no specific strategies that permit primary breast cancer prevention, although its incidence can be decreased through health promotion actions, emphasizing attention with risk factors, including obesity and smoking (5) . (scielo.br)
  • The Late Effects Study Group followed a cohort of 1380 children with Hodgkin's disease to determine the incidence of second neoplasms and the risk factors associated with them. (uni-bonn.de)
  • The incidence of mammary desmoid tumours is less than 0.2% of primary breast neoplasms. (wikipedia.org)
  • Diseases
  • Specifically, those women who have a family history of this disease and those whose lifestyle's are in a way that makes them more at risk of breast cancer, the examinations and tests should be done on a regular basis in order to cure this diseases at the early stages. (ac.ir)
  • WP 840-870 Breast Diseases. (mef.hr)
  • TTC39A has been tested for association to diseases like breast neoplasms and is expected to have molecular binding function and localizes in various compartments (extracellular space, membrane, nucleus). (wikipedia.org)
  • 1990
  • Over one-half of the 300,000 breast cancer deaths worldwide in 1990 (the latest year with such data) occurred in developed countries, but annual mortality rates ranged from 27/100,000 women in northern Europe to 4/100,000 women in Asia. (wiley.com)
  • tissue
  • Breast cancer is consensually considered genetically and clinically as a heterogeneous disease, in that it reflects the heterogeneity of the normal breast tissue at its origin17873350. (wikipedia.org)
  • at DCEG DCEG Publications Database Search for Dr. Fraumeni Li FP, Fraumeni JF Jr. Soft-tissue sarcomas, breast cancer, and other neoplasms. (wikipedia.org)
  • The fat-graft transfer approach augments the size and corrects contour defects of the breast hemisphere with grafts of autologous adipocyte fat tissue, drawn from the woman's body. (wikipedia.org)
  • In a breast-reconstruction procedure, within a multi-stage reconstruction-mammoplasty, a tissue expander (a temporary breast-implant device) is emplaced and used to prepare (shape and enlarge) the recipient site (implant-pocket) to receive and accommodate the breast implant prosthesis. (wikipedia.org)
  • In a non-implant breast-augmentation procedure, some fat-graft injection approaches feature tissue-engineering, which is the pre-operative, external expansion of the tissues of the recipient site to receive the grafts of adipocyte tissue drawn from the woman's body. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the case of the woman with much breast tissue, for whom sub-muscular emplacement is the recommended surgical approach, saline breast implants can afford an aesthetic result much like that afforded by silicone breast implants - a "look" of proportionate breast size, smooth contour, and realistic texture. (wikipedia.org)
  • tumor
  • Primary desmoid tumor (extraabdominal fibromatosis) of the breast. (radiopaedia.org)
  • Stage I is an invasive breast cancer with the tumor not exceeding 2 cm and absence of lymph node involvement. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mutation or over expression of oncogenes can be kept under controlled expression in a very specific cellular context rather than throughout the organism.Another way to model human breast cancer is done through the targeted inhibition of a tumor suppressor gene. (wikipedia.org)
  • diagnostic
  • A case of colonic obstruction due to carcinomatosis secondary to breast cancer is reported, emphasizing its diagnostic aspects and treatment. (scielo.br)
  • prevalence
  • The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence of the risk factors for breast cancer among women between 40 and 69 years old in the city of Maringá, Paraná State, Brazil. (scielo.br)
  • In view of this problem, this research intended to identify the prevalence of risk factors for breast cancer in women between 40 and 69 years, in Maringá, PR. (scielo.br)
  • This age range was chosen due to the greater prevalence of illness and death by breast cancer in the age range between 40 and 69 years (5) . (scielo.br)
  • But thanks to the prevalence of medical tourism, patients with breast neoplasms can now undergo cancer treatment in Southeast Asia at 50% to 75% less than its usual cost. (docdoc.com)
  • invasive
  • Although many of the epithelial lesions/changes listed below are neoplastic, they are best thought of as neoplasms at increased risk and along a continuum with normal breast at one end and invasive carcinoma at the other. (radiopaedia.org)
  • The technical goal of saline-implant technology was a physically less invasive surgical technique for emplacing an empty breast-implant device through a smaller surgical incision. (wikipedia.org)
  • radiation
  • Treatment may consist of radiation, lumpectomy, mastectomy, chemotherapy and hormone therapy.men can have breast cancer, too, but the number of cases is small. (icd10data.com)
  • 2000 cGy) of radiation (relative risk, 5.9) were associated with significantly increased risk of breast cancer. (uni-bonn.de)
  • Many males with breast cancer have inherited a BRCA mutation, but there are other causes, including alcohol abuse and exposure to certain hormones and ionizing radiation. (wikipedia.org)
  • He was a principal investigator and member of the Executive Committee of the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast Project, which, in a series of studies demonstrated the effectiveness of lumpectomy, in combination with radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and/or hormonal therapy, over radical mastectomy as an effective treatment for many breast cancer patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • elsewhere
  • A primary malignant neoplasm that overlaps two or more contiguous (next to each other) sites should be classified to the subcategory/code .8 ('overlapping lesion'), unless the combination is specifically indexed elsewhere. (icd10data.com)
  • mutation
  • About 5% of women with breast cancer have an inherited susceptibility to the disease, and most of these women have an inherited mutation in one of two genes. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Young women who get breast cancer often come from families that carry a BRCA1 mutation. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • FRIDAY, Jan. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Lynparza (olaparib) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat spreading breast cancer caused by a BRCA gene mutation. (hon.ch)
  • About 5 to 10 percent of people with breast cancer have a BRCA mutation, the FDA said. (hon.ch)
  • clinical
  • Lynparza was evaluated to treat breast cancer in clinical studies involving 302 people. (hon.ch)
  • The drug was evaluated in clinical studies involving almost 700 people whose breast cancer had progressed after treatment with endocrine therapy. (hon.ch)
  • rare
  • Peritoneal carcinomatosis due to breast cancer is rare and gastrointestinal tract involvement is also unusual. (scielo.br)
  • Mesenchymal neoplasms of the gallbladder are rare and in particular leiomyomas of the gallbladder have been rarely reported, all of them in patients with immune system disorders. (wikipedia.org)
  • women
  • Epidemiological study has identified certain risk factors that increase the possibility that a woman will get breast cancer, although not all women with breast cancer have these traits, and many women with all of these traits do not develop the disease. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The defective gene can be inherited from either parent, but appears to cause breast cancer only in women. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Estimates for 2008 in Brazil, valid for 2009 as well, indicate 466,730 new cases of cancer and one of the most incident types among women is breast cancer, with an estimated number of 49,400 new cases (50.71/100,000 women). (scielo.br)
  • In Paraná, 2970 new cases of breast cancer (56.7/100,000 women) occurred in 2006. (scielo.br)
  • Khadennia A, Bayat M, Vandaee O A, Azami M. An Overview of Breast Neoplasms in Women. (ac.ir)
  • Breast imaging, as a way to reduce the risk of this problem has been suggested to those women who are at risk of this disease. (ac.ir)
  • Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. (icd10data.com)
  • Breast cancer kills more women in the United States than any cancer except lung cancer. (icd10data.com)
  • No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are a number of risk factors. (icd10data.com)
  • Women who have family members with breast or ovarian cancer may wish to be tested. (icd10data.com)
  • Systematic screening for breast cancer could be important in the health care of such women. (uni-bonn.de)
  • More than 250,000 women in the United States are projected to be diagnosed with breast cancer this year, and more than 40,000 will die from it, according to estimates from the U.S. National Cancer Institute. (hon.ch)
  • The drug shouldn't be taken by women who are pregnant, hoping to become pregnant or breast-feeding, the agency warned. (hon.ch)
  • Breast cancer accounts for one-third of cancer diagnoses and 15% of cancer deaths in U.S. women. (wiley.com)
  • FRIDAY, Sept. 29, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Verzenio (abemaciclib) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat women with certain advanced forms of breast cancer, the most common cancer in the United States. (hon.ch)
  • BRCA
  • This class of drugs has been used to treat advanced, BRCA-mutated ovarian cancer and has now shown efficacy in treating certain types of BRCA-mutated breast cancer," said Dr. Richard Pazdur, director of the FDA's Oncology Center of Excellence. (hon.ch)
  • skin
  • swelling of the breast, or a skin lesion such as an ulcer. (wikipedia.org)
  • yet, it is likelier to cause cosmetic problems, such as the rippling and the wrinkling of the breast-envelope skin, and technical problems, such as the presence of the implant being noticeable to the eye and to the touch. (wikipedia.org)
  • risk of breast cancer
  • Although there are not conclusive evidences to prove the role of certain chemicals for increasing the risk of breast cancer, there are many reasons for increasing concerns in this area that will be discussed in details. (ac.ir)
  • patients with breast
  • Verzenio provides a new targeted treatment option for certain patients with breast cancer who are not responding to treatment, and unlike [similar drugs], it can be given as a standalone treatment to patients who were previously treated with endocrine therapy and chemotherapy," said Dr. Richard Pazdur, director of the FDA's Oncology Center of Excellence. (hon.ch)
  • types
  • There are many types of breast neoplasms , which can be divided into the following broad oversimplified categories as a starting point. (radiopaedia.org)
  • For breast reconstruction, and for the augmentation and enhancement of the aesthetics - size, shape, and texture - of a woman's breasts, there are three types of breast implant devices: saline implants filled with sterile saline solution silicone implants filled with viscous silicone gel alternative-composition implants, filled with miscellaneous fillers - soy oil, polypropylene string, etc. - that are no longer manufactured. (wikipedia.org)
  • Studies
  • With the relative infrequency of male breast cancer, randomized studies are lacking. (wikipedia.org)
  • Richard Margolese, C.M. MD FRCS (C), (born 30 July 1935) is a Canadian scientist and has been a leader of multiple research studies that have changed the standard treatment for early stage breast cancer. (wikipedia.org)