• kidney
  • SCN is funding a total of 31 goal-directed projects from across Canada that are moving research from lab bench to bedside in areas such as brain injury, kidney disease and breast cancer. (medindia.net)
  • The American Association of Kidney Patients is a voluntary patient organization, which has been dedicated to improving the lives of fellow kidney patients and their families by helping them deal with the physical, emotional and social impact of kidney disease for more than 40 years. (healthfinder.gov)
  • AAKP is a national organization that reaches one million people yearly affected by kidney disease, including patients, family members, renal professionals and friends. (healthfinder.gov)
  • It is the only national kidney patient organization directed by kidney patients for kidney patients. (healthfinder.gov)
  • Ochroconis gallopava was thought to cause epidemic fatal encephalitis only in fowls, turkeys, and poults at first, however recently it has been increasingly recognized as a pathogen for human following solid organ transplantation, such as kidney, liver, heart, and lung. (wikipedia.org)
  • Brain abscess (or cerebral abscess) is an abscess caused by inflammation and collection of infected material, coming from local (ear infection, dental abscess, infection of paranasal sinuses, infection of the mastoid air cells of the temporal bone, epidural abscess) or remote (lung, heart, kidney etc.) infectious sources, within the brain tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • cerebral
  • Our study showed that cell transplantation therapy may improve brain receptor function in patients who suffered from cerebral stroke, improving their neurological symptoms," said Satoshi Kuroda, M.D., Ph.D., who is with the department of neurosurgery at Hokkaido University School of Medicine in Sapporo, Japan. (innovations-report.com)
  • Using autoradiography (a technique that uses X-ray film to visualize radioactively labeled molecules) and fluorescence immunohistochemistry (the testing of sections of tissue for specific proteins by attaching them with specific antibodies), the researchers examined the binding of a radioactive molecule with a specific receptor protein in animals with cerebral infarcts or strokes. (innovations-report.com)
  • The authors emphasized that "it is essential to clarify the underlying mechanism before undertaking clinical trials with stem cell-based approaches for patients with cerebral stoke. (innovations-report.com)
  • therefore, we chose receptor imaging to assess the effects of cell transplantation therapy on cerebral stroke," he explained. (innovations-report.com)
  • A cerebral organoid describes artificially grown, in vitro, miniature organs resembling the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • Using human pluripotent stem cells to create in vitro cerebral organoids allows researchers to summarize current developmental mechanisms for human neural tissue as well as study the roots of human neurological diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Tissue Morphogenesis Tissue morphogenesis with respect to cerebral organoids covers how neural organs form in vertebrates. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cell fate potential Cross species developmental timing Cerebral organoids provide a unique insight into the timing of development of neural tissues and can be used as a tool to study the differences across species. (wikipedia.org)
  • Drug high-throughput screening Cerebral organoids can be used as simple models of complex brain tissues to study the effects of drugs and to screen them for initial safety and efficacy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cell replacement therapy Cerebral organoids can be used as a simple model to show how cell replacement therapy would work on brain tissues. (wikipedia.org)
  • In one case, a cerebral organoid grown from a patient with microcephaly demonstrated related symptoms and revealed that apparently the cause is overly rapid development, followed by slower brain growth. (wikipedia.org)
  • A watershed stroke or watershed infarct is defined as ischemia that is localized to the vulnerable border zones between the tissues supplied via the Anterior, Posterior and Middle Cerebral arteries. (wikipedia.org)
  • Watershed locations are those border-zone regions in the brain supplied by the major cerebral arteries where blood supply is decreased. (wikipedia.org)
  • These events are localized to two primary regions of the brain: Cortical watershed strokes (CWS), or outer brain infarcts, are located between the cortical territories of the anterior cerebral artery (ACA), middle cerebral artery (MCA), and posterior cerebral artery (PCA). (wikipedia.org)
  • These varying terms have arisen from the considerable anatomic variability both in the cerebral vascular structure and the territories of the brain that they supply. (wikipedia.org)
  • Parkinson's Disease
  • Ethical challenges in cell-based interventions for neurological conditions: some lessons to be learnt from clinical transplantation trials in patients with Parkinson's disease. (georgetown.edu)
  • Patients between 18 and 75 years old who have moderately advanced Parkinson's disease and motor problems resulting from levodopa therapy may be eligible for this 5-week study. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The objective of this study is to evaluate the acute effects of a potent inhibitor of dopamine reuptake on the severity of parkinsonian signs and levodopa-associated motor response complications in patients with Parkinson's disease. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Patients with relatively advanced Parkinson's disease between 20 and 80 years of age may be eligible for this 4-week study. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • 1. A method of treating a patient with Parkinson's disease or Parkinsonian disorders comprising administering PDGF-BB in vivo directly to the central nervous system of said patient, wherein the PDGF-BB is administered in an amount of between 0.5 ng/kg/day to 500 ng/kg/day. (google.com)
  • 3. A method of increasing the number of dopaminergic neurons in a patient suffering from Parkinson's disease or Parkinsonian disorders comprising the step of infusing the central nervous system of said patient with an amount of PDGF-BB of between 0.5 ng/kg/day to 500 ng/kg/day to increase the number of dopaminergic neurons. (google.com)
  • Management of Parkinson's disease (PD), due to its chronic nature, requires a broad-based program including patient and family education, support group services, general wellness maintenance, exercise, and nutrition. (wikipedia.org)
  • fetal tissue
  • Previous works had shown that the surgical implantation of human fetal tissue into this part of the brain may reactivate the lost functions and decrease Parkinson s symptoms, but this procedure has remained controversial due to anti-abortion issues. (cerebromente.org.br)
  • acute
  • Like other melanized fungi, the clinical presentation of O. gallopava is phaeohyphomycosis characterized by darkly colored lesions in affected tissues, acute or chronic inflammation, microabscesses, fibrosis, granulomas, and necrosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Beaumont Hospital's acute stroke service offers acute interventional neuroradiology (e.g. thrombectomy) and neurosurgical (e.g. hemi-craniectomy) services for acute stroke patients referred from other hospitals in the Greater Dublin Area. (wikipedia.org)
  • dopamine
  • it is clear, however, that dopamine production by brain cells in the substantia nigra is diminished in the disease. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Controlled release of dopamine from a polymeric brain implant In vivo characterization. (docme.ru)
  • During MJ, Freese A, Sabel BA, Saltzrnan WM, Deutch A, Roth RH, Langer R.Controiled release of dopamine from a polymeric brain implant: in vivo characterization. (docme.ru)
  • Studies using continuous intravenous infusion have demonstrated a reduction in these fluctuations, as have manipulations of oral dose and diet, suggesting that steady deiivery of L-dopa or dopamine to the brain is desirable for optimai and perhaps long-term clinical response [13-2 11. (docme.ru)
  • We have developed an alternative potentiai therapeutic modaiity based on the locaiized delivery of dopamine to the corpus striatum from a polymeric brain implant. (docme.ru)
  • Parkinson s disease is a neurodegenerative disease caused by progressive dopamine brain cells loss. (medindia.net)
  • bone
  • Studies have shown that cells taken from adult human bone marrow may possibly be converted into neural cells-cells with the ability to convert to any type of cell found in the body-that could then be transplanted into the brain. (innovations-report.com)
  • Their findings "clearly showed" that bone marrow stromal cells "may contribute to neural tissue regeneration by migrating toward the periinfarct area and acquiring the neuron-specific receptor function," reports the JNM article. (innovations-report.com)
  • [ 2 , 8 ] Survivors of bone marrow transplantation were more likely to have a severe or life threatening condition (relative risk [RR] = 3.9), more than one chronic condition (RR = 2.6), functional impairment (RR=3.5), and activity limitations (RR = 5.8) than conventionally treated patients. (medscape.com)
  • These data reinforce the need for marked vigilance in ensuring proper screening and management of long-term survivors of bone marrow transplantation. (medscape.com)
  • HSB oversees the nation's organ, bone marrow and cord blood donation and transplantation systems, poison control and vaccine injury compensation programs, and a drug discount program for certain safety-net health care providers. (healthfinder.gov)
  • In cases of trauma, for example in compound skull fractures where fragments of bone are pushed into the substance of the brain, the cause of the abscess is obvious. (wikipedia.org)
  • clinical
  • Molecular imaging and nuclear medicine are useful tools that allow the visualization of different kinds of neuronal functions to evaluate cell transplantation therapy in both experimental and clinical situations, said Kuroda. (innovations-report.com)
  • For the first 1 to 3 days, patients will be admitted to the NIH Clinical Center to undergo a levodopa 'dose-finding' procedure. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The disease is characterised pathologically by an early and progressive striatal neuronal cell loss and atrophy, which has provided the rationale for first clinical trials of neural repair using fetal striatal cell transplantation. (bmj.com)
  • In adults, many ventricular assist devices (VADs) have been developed to clinical maturity that can function as an effective bridge to transplantation. (ahajournals.org)
  • Beginning with the PROWESS clinical trial of 2001, it was recognised that many of the symptoms of sepsis may be ameliorated by infusion of APC, and mortality rates of septic patients may be significantly decreased. (wikipedia.org)
  • In contrast to the earlier attempts at hand transplantation, the Louisville group had performed extensive basic science research and feasibility studies for many years prior to their first clinical procedure (for example, Shirbacheh et al. (wikipedia.org)
  • All eligible patients in whom cancer progresses and for whom no standard of care treatment options are available should be enrolled in a clinical trial[citation needed]. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cells
  • Few subjects in biomedical science have captured the imagination of both the scientific community and the public as has the use of stem cells for the repair of damaged tissues. (jci.org)
  • Funded trials will focus on a spectrum of health issues including treating fatal illnesses such as septic shock, evaluating a stem cell therapy for diabetes, and expanding stem cells from cord blood for efficacious and cost effective transplantation. (medindia.net)
  • A new kind of stem cell that can form new brain cells have been discovered by researchers from Lund University leading to hopes for people with serious brain injuries. (medindia.net)
  • Analysing brain tissue from biopsies, the researchers for the first time found stem cells locatedaround small blood vessels in the brain. (medindia.net)
  • 2. A method for inducing the in situ proliferation or differentiation of neural stem cells or neural progenitor cells located in a neural tissue of a human, the method comprising administering an amount of PDGF-BB of between 0.5 ng/kg/day to 500 ng/kg/day, to the neural tissue to induce the proliferation or differentiation of the neural stem cells or neural progenitor cells. (google.com)
  • 4. The method of claim 1 wherein said method induces the differentiation, migration, proliferation or survival of neural stem cells or neural progenitor cell in said patient. (google.com)
  • The pluripotency of the human amniotic epithelial cells makes them useful in treating and fighting diseases and disorders of the nervous system as well as other tissues of the human body. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, several billion cells are required to use for transplantation in order to treat and fight diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Therefore, the cells must be expanded in a lab to have enough cells for transplantation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Unlike embryonic stem cells, amniotic stem cells have not shown a propensity for developing into teratomas and other cancer-like tumors upon injection into living tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some neural stem cells persist in the adult vertebrate brain and continue to produce neurons throughout life. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1989, Sally Temple described multipotent, self-renewing progenitor and stem cells in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the mouse brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is the process by which T cells are attracted to specific tissue and organ targets. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cell isolation is the process of separating individual living cells from a solid block of tissue or cell suspension. (wikipedia.org)
  • While some types of cell naturally exist in a separated form, for example blood cells, other cell types that are found in solid tissue requiring specific techniques to separate into individual cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • After a tissue specimen has been obtained, it must be surrounded or perfused by a solution at an appropriate temperature containing the salts and nutrients required to keep the cells alive. (wikipedia.org)
  • Isolation of cells from some tissues may be improved by oxygenating the solution. (wikipedia.org)
  • When isolation cells from brain tissue, other enzymes that break down DNA (DNAases) may be required. (wikipedia.org)
  • After the enzymes have been removed from the tissue by perfusing it with a second solution that does not contain enzymes, cells can be mechanically separated or dissociated. (wikipedia.org)
  • A simple technique for dissociating cells involves cutting the tissue into small chunk before agitating the chunks in a solution using a pipette. (wikipedia.org)
  • The virus infection provokes an inflammatory response of paneth cells in the intestine, helping to spread the virus by causing tissue damage. (wikipedia.org)
  • Stem cells have the potential to grow into many different types of tissues and their fate is dependent on many factors. (wikipedia.org)
  • Below is an image showing some of the chemical factors that can lead stem cells to differentiate into various neural tissues. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cell-type specific genome assays Organoids can be used to study the crucial early stages of brain development, test drugs and, because they can be made from living cells, study individual patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • P22phox can be associated with NOX1, NOX3 and NOX4 in several cells and tissues, but the level of ROS production is far lower than those produced in phagocytes by cytb. (wikipedia.org)
  • White blood cells, carried to the area by the newly returning blood, release a host of inflammatory factors such as interleukins as well as free radicals in response to tissue damage. (wikipedia.org)
  • symptoms
  • Implementing the collaborative care model for patients with dementia and depression, which often occur together, reduces patients' behavioral and psychological symptoms, diminishes the burden on patients' informal caregivers and enhances the quality of care delivered to the patient. (medindia.net)
  • The onset of symptoms in immunosuppressed individuals after transplantation is very slow, almost several months to years after organ transplantation surgery, but the infection can severely damage the host once it appears. (wikipedia.org)
  • When medications are not enough to control symptoms, surgical techniques such as deep brain stimulation can relieve the associated movement disorders. (wikipedia.org)
  • When this occurs, PD patients change rapidly from stages with good response to medication and few symptoms ("on" state) to phases with no response to medication and important motor symptoms ("off" state). (wikipedia.org)
  • These symptoms are caused by a combination of increased intracranial pressure due to a space-occupying lesion (headache, vomiting, confusion, coma), infection (fever, fatigue etc.) and focal neurologic brain tissue damage (hemiparesis, aphasia etc. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other symptoms and findings depend largely on the specific location of the abscess in the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • Organisms that are most frequently associated with brain abscess in patients with AIDS are poliovirus, Toxoplasma gondii, and Cryptococcus neoformans, though in infection with the latter organism, symptoms of meningitis generally predominate. (wikipedia.org)
  • The resulting symptoms differ based on the affected area of the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • After the initial stroke, other symptoms depend on the area of the brain affected. (wikipedia.org)
  • cardiac
  • Though the treatment of children with acquired and congenital heart disease has advanced significantly in recent years, a subset of patients will experience refractory myocardial failure, necessitating cardiac transplantation. (ahajournals.org)
  • In the initial stages, perfusing the tissue with a solution that does not contain calcium is useful particularly when isolating cardiac myocytes, as the absence of calcium causes separation of the intercalated disks. (wikipedia.org)
  • occur
  • When it does occur in humans, a wide range of sites may become involved, including the lung, heart, brain, the superficial cutaneous or subcutaneous areas, and other parts of the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • Another school of thought focuses on hypothermia's ability to prevent the injuries that occur after circulation returns to the brain, or what is termed reperfusion injuries. (wikipedia.org)
  • stroke
  • Overcoming damage to the brain - and getting drugs to the brain - are challenges following a stroke. (washington.edu)
  • There are several conditions that can predispose someone to watershed stroke by increasing the likelihood that insufficient blood supply will be able to reach the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • Early diagnosis and timely medical intervention can drastically reduce the severity of a stroke, limit damage to the brain, improve the chances of a full recovery and reduce recovery times massively. (wikipedia.org)
  • Reperfusion injury plays a part in the brain's ischemic cascade, which is involved in stroke and brain trauma. (wikipedia.org)
  • species
  • opening the way for the use of brain transplantations of other species. (cerebromente.org.br)
  • Another hypothesis would be that normally, tissues contain free radical scavengers to avoid damage by oxidizing species normally contained in the blood. (wikipedia.org)
  • Once blood flow is reestablished, oxygen species contained in the blood will damage the ischemic tissue because the function of the scavengers is decreased. (wikipedia.org)
  • trials
  • This program supports phase I/II trials with the potential to be economically viable for health care systems and show a benefit to patients. (medindia.net)
  • This procedure is called therapeutic hypothermia, and it has been shown by a number of large, high-quality randomised trials to significantly improve survival and reduce brain damage after birth asphyxia in newborn infants, almost doubling the chance of normal survival. (wikipedia.org)
  • cohort of patients
  • Since the first large cohort of patients was cured in the 1970s, much has been learned about the long-term effects of exposure to chemotherapy, radiation and surgery in childhood. (medscape.com)
  • neurons
  • Neurons are generated in large numbers by NSCs during a specific period of embryonic development through the process of neurogenesis, and continue to be generated in adult life in restricted regions of the adult brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • The human brain is an extremely complex system of heterogeneous tissues and consists of an extremely diverse array of neurons. (wikipedia.org)
  • cell
  • The next step is to try to control and enhance stem cell self-healing properties with the aimof carrying out therapies targeted to a specific area of the brain. (medindia.net)
  • The results contribute to better understanding of how brain cell plasticity works and opens up new opportunities to exploit these very features. (medindia.net)
  • Her research team designed a treatment that delivers the sustained and sequential release of two therapeutics to the brain, which results in neural stem cell stimulation and tissue repair. (washington.edu)
  • Shiochet also developed a cell transplantation technique to help restore vision in patients with diseases such as macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa, which are both associated with a loss of photoreceptors. (washington.edu)
  • Sometimes an autograft is done to remove the tissue and then treat it or the person before returning it (examples include stem cell autograft and storing blood in advance of surgery). (wikipedia.org)
  • Ischemic tissue would have decreased function of these scavengers because of cell injury. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ethical
  • To fulfill this mission, the AATB publishes Standards to ensure that the conduct of tissue banking meets acceptable norms of technical and ethical performance. (healthfinder.gov)
  • human tissue
  • Surplus human tissue can sometimes be obtained at the time of planned surgery, for example specimens of right atrial appendage are often excised and discarded during coronary artery bypass surgery. (wikipedia.org)
  • complications
  • In addition to complications seen from exposure to chemotherapy and radiation, patients undergoing allogeneic transplantation can experience unique late effects secondary to graft versus host disease (GVHD) and autoimmunity. (medscape.com)
  • Two phases are usually distinguished: an initial phase in which the individual with PD has already developed some disability for which he or she needs pharmacological treatment, and a second stage in which the patient develops motor complications related to levodopa usage. (wikipedia.org)
  • A former strategy to reduce motor complications was to withdraw patients from L-DOPA for some time. (wikipedia.org)
  • involve
  • This may be performed by simply submerging the tissue in the solution, or may involve more complex arrangements such as Langendorff perfusion. (wikipedia.org)
  • Surplus
  • Sometimes this is done with surplus tissue, tissue that can regenerate, or tissues more desperately needed elsewhere (examples include skin grafts, vein extraction for CABG, etc. (wikipedia.org)
  • assessment
  • Patients receiving Healthy Aging Brain Center care are given an initial cognitive assessment including neuro-psychological testing, a brain imaging test, medication review and structured neurological and physical evaluations. (medindia.net)
  • This paper describes the long-term follow up over a 3-10-year postoperative period of the patients, grafted and non-grafted, recruited to this cohort using the 'Core assessment program for intracerebral transplantations-HD' assessment protocol. (bmj.com)
  • hospitals
  • An average 60 patients per day are admitted for trauma or elective treatment, making it one of the busiest general Hospitals in the country. (wikipedia.org)
  • Beaumont Hospital is one of two hospitals (the other being Cork University Hospital) which offers neuro-oncology treatment to patients throughout the Republic of Ireland. (wikipedia.org)
  • diseases
  • SNM members have introduced-and continue to explore-biological and technological innovations in medicine that noninvasively investigate the molecular basis of diseases, benefiting countless generations of patients. (innovations-report.com)
  • This complexity has made studying the brain and understanding how it works a difficult task in neuroscience, especially when it comes to neurodegenerative diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • proliferation
  • In previous studies, cultured neurospheres have been transplanted into the brains of immunodeficient neonatal mice and have shown engraftment, proliferation, and neural differentiation. (wikipedia.org)
  • study
  • Study shows that a new patient and caregiver centered model of innovative, coordinated brain care for older adults improves health outcomes and quality of care for those with cognitive impairment. (medindia.net)
  • A new study from the Regenstrief Institute, Eskenazi Health and Indiana University Center for Aging Research implementation scientists who developed the Healthy Aging Brain Center care model shows that such care also produces impressive cost savings. (medindia.net)
  • Three-quarters of the non-Healthy Aging Brain Center study participants were female. (medindia.net)
  • Patients enrolled in the study will, if possible, stop taking all antiparkinson medications except levodopa (Sinemet) for one month before the study begins and through its duration. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • For this study, patients will stop taking their usual oral levodopa medicine and instead will have levodopa infused through a vein for up to 12 hours. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • All participants will receive placebo at some time during the study, and some patients will receive only placebo throughout the entire 4 weeks. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • At the end of each week, patients will be readmitted to the hospital and receive the previous week's dose of riluzole or placebo in combination with a levodopa infusion at the rate determined in the dose-finding phase of the study. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • years
  • [ 7 ] of 798 patients who survived more than 5 years after transplantation, 328 were children. (medscape.com)
  • A significant age acceleration effect could be detected in brain (7.4 years) and blood (5.2 years) tissue due to HIV-1 infection with the help of a biomarker of aging, which is known as epigenetic clock. (wikipedia.org)
  • infection
  • One patient had a driveline infection requiring treatment. (ahajournals.org)
  • Infection accompanies brain involvement, respiratory tract involvement, pulmonary infections, and skin infections and many others. (wikipedia.org)
  • When the fungal infection only concerns with systemic involvement except the brain, the probability of cure is higher. (wikipedia.org)
  • treatments
  • Ultimately the goal is to strengthen these mechanisms anddevelop new treatments that can repair the diseased brain. (medindia.net)
  • effects
  • Elderly patients are at increased risk for adverse effects because of reduced drug tolerance and should be assessed for postural hypotension, pulse irregularities, blepharospasm, and anxiety and confusion. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • the patient is instructed in their use and potential side effects so that the dosage can be adjusted to minimize the side effects. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • On treatment days, patients will have a brief medical examination before receiving the drug and will then be monitored for side effects for about 6 to 8 hours after taking the drug. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • medications
  • The staff then helps both the patient and family caregivers develop a personal treatment plan that typically includes recognizing potentially harmful medications, prescribing new medications, initiating brain and physical exercise regimens, training in problem solving, and working on reducing stress to improve daily life. (medindia.net)
  • and encourages use of medications that are not harmful to older brains. (medindia.net)
  • If patients have periods of immobility alternating with periods of severely impaired mobility, they may need changes in their medication schedule or new, additional medications. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • mammalian
  • The first evidence that neurogenesis occurs in certain regions of the adult mammalian brain came from [3H]-thymidine labeling studies conducted by Altman and Das in 1965 which showed postnatal hippocampal neurogensis in young rats. (wikipedia.org)