• dorsal
  • Triquetral fractures can occur due to forceful flexion of the wrist, causing an avulsion of the dorsal aspect of the bone that is often hidden on anterior radiographs, but can be seen as a tiny bone fragment on lateral views. (wikipedia.org)
  • This surface is bounded by two lines, which commence in small tubercles situated on either side of the digital extremity, and, passing upward, converge and meet some distance above the center of the bone and form a ridge which runs along the rest of the dorsal surface to the carpal extremity. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bucked shins are sometimes called 'shin splints,' which involve small stress fractures of the dorsal cannon bone, often seen in race training, and discussed elsewhere. (wikipedia.org)
  • splint bone
  • Splints is an ailment of the horse or pony, characterized by a hard, bony swelling, usually on the inside of a front leg, lying between the splint and cannon bone or on the splint bone itself. (wikipedia.org)
  • Severe enough trauma can fracture the splint bone. (wikipedia.org)
  • Others may need surgical removal of a portion of the damaged splint bone. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bench-kneed conformation causes excess loading of the medial splint bone, which can lead to splints. (wikipedia.org)
  • Because the splint bone does have some mobility independent of the cannon bone, it can cause tension and strain on the periosteum of the splint bone where the interosseous ligament attaches. (wikipedia.org)
  • Blind splints" are named because the bony reaction happens on the inside border between the splint bone and cannon bone, where it can not be seen, and is usually not palpable. (wikipedia.org)
  • More severe lameness is sometimes associated with a fractured splint bone, or soft tissue injury adjacent to the splints. (wikipedia.org)
  • Blind splints" usually produce mild lameness that is difficult to pinpoint because there is no obvious swelling, pain, or bony changes related to the exterior of the splint bone. (wikipedia.org)
  • At times, bone proliferation on the axial border of the splint bone can be seen radiographically, but ultrasound is much more sensitive for detecting blind splints. (wikipedia.org)
  • A splint involving the cannon alone is more likely to disappear than one involving the splint bone itself. (wikipedia.org)
  • If a trainer does not decrease the workload sufficiently, and the splint bone continues to receive concussion, the injury is likely to continue or worsen. (wikipedia.org)
  • mammals
  • any bone present in amphibia, reptiles, birds and mammals in the part of the forelimb attached to the radius and ulna. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The term tetrapodomorph is used for the stem-based definition: any animal that is more closely related to living amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals than to living dipnoi (lungfishes). (wikipedia.org)
  • Batrachomorphs are all animals sharing a more recent common ancestry with living amphibians than with living amniotes (reptiles, birds, and mammals). (wikipedia.org)
  • The giraffe (Giraffa) is a genus of African even-toed ungulate mammals, the tallest living terrestrial animals and the largest ruminants. (wikipedia.org)
  • ulna
  • In reptiles and amphibians, the bone is instead referred to as the ulnare , since (at least in the most primitive fossils) it articulates with the ulna . (wikipedia.org)
  • incus
  • Though the term may refer to any small bone throughout the body, it typically refers to the malleus, incus, and stapes (hammer, anvil, and stirrup) of the middle ear. (wikipedia.org)
  • The incus (Latin: "anvil") is connected to both the other bones. (wikipedia.org)
  • The first written description of the malleus and incus was by Berengario da Carpi in his Commentaria super anatomia Mundini (1521), although he only briefly described two bones and noted their theoretical association with the transmission of sound. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the ear-the lenticular process of the incus is a sesamoid bone and therefore is considered the fourth ossicle of the middle ear. (wikipedia.org)
  • mandible
  • A bird's skeleton accounts for only about 5% of its total body weight The skull consists of five major bones: the frontal (top of head), parietal (back of head), premaxillary and nasal (top beak), and the mandible (bottom beak). (wikipedia.org)
  • horses
  • AIM: To describe features of the morphology of the carpus, quantify the thickness of hyaline and calcified cartilage, and to describe the morphology and density of subchondral bone in the third carpal bone (C3) of young Thoroughbred horses in early training. (galileo-training.com)
  • Horses typically have 205 bones. (wikipedia.org)
  • In some older horses, the cannon and splint bones may become completely fused. (wikipedia.org)
  • horse's
  • Equine conformation evaluates the degree of correctness of a horse's bone structure, musculature, and its body proportions in relation to each other. (wikipedia.org)
  • The periosteum is damaged by the trauma, and the horse's body lays down new bone in the injured area. (wikipedia.org)
  • cartilage
  • A noninfectious deterioration of the cartilage which covers the surfaces of the bones in the joints. (mypetsbrace.com)
  • As the embryo develops, the cartilage hardens to form bone. (wikipedia.org)
  • At birth, the kneecap is just formed from cartilage, and this will ossify (change to bone) between the ages of three and five years. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cartilage is a thin, elastic tissue that protects the bone and makes certain that the joint surfaces can slide easily over each other. (wikipedia.org)
  • ribs
  • Elongated flat bone to which the ribs are attached and bearing a carina on its front surface. (ikonet.com)
  • Flat elongated and sometimes segmented bone to which the ribs are attached. (ikonet.com)
  • The ribs are examples of flat bones. (wikipedia.org)
  • The sternum consists of multiple sternebrae, which fuse to form one bone, attached to the 8 "true" pairs of ribs, out of a total of 18. (wikipedia.org)
  • vertebral column
  • Thin curved bone articulating with the vertebral column and the sternum. (ikonet.com)
  • The vertebral column consists of irregular bones. (wikipedia.org)
  • The vertebral column usually contains 54 bones: 7 cervical vertebrae, including the atlas (C1) and axis (C2) which support and help move the skull, 18 (or rarely, 19) thoracic, 5-6 lumbar, 5 sacral (which fuse together to form the sacrum), and 15-25 caudal vertebrae with an average of 18. (wikipedia.org)
  • musculature
  • The breed standard from Boerboel International is as follows: The Boerboel Is large, with a strong-boned structure and a well-developed musculature. (wikipedia.org)
  • species
  • But the arm of a man, the fore-leg of the horse, the paddle of the whale, and the wing of the bat and the bird are all also homologous parts, yet of another kind, i.e. they are the same parts existing in animals of different species. (wikisource.org)
  • In the early Paleocene of North America, the place of the above species was taken by Tetraclaenodon puercensis, an animal only half the size of P. primaevus, with the terminal joints of the limbs intermediate between hoofs and claws, and the first and fifth toes taking their full share in the support of the weight of the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, within the mesobatrachians families, it can be dependent on the species as to whether the palatine bone is present. (wikipedia.org)
  • The number of hollow bones varies among species, though large gliding and soaring birds tend to have the most. (wikipedia.org)
  • The bones of diving birds are often less hollow than those of non-diving species. (wikipedia.org)