• atherosclerosis
  • The most common problem in FH is the development of coronary artery disease (atherosclerosis of the coronary arteries that supply the heart) at a much younger age than would be expected in the general population. (wikipedia.org)
  • Atherosclerosis risk is increased further with age and in those who smoke, have diabetes, high blood pressure and a family history of cardiovascular disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • infection
  • Antibody - A natural substance in the blood that recognizes and destroys foreign invaders and that causes an immune response to vaccination or infection. (poultryhelp.com)
  • Wet gangrene can result from the same causes as dry gangrene but always includes infection. (rxlist.com)
  • In some cases of wet gangrene, the initial cause is considered to be the infection. (rxlist.com)
  • Wet gangrene results from an untreated (or inadequately treated) infection in the body where the local blood supply has been reduced or stopped by tissue swelling, gas production in tissue, bacterial toxins, or all of these factors in combination. (rxlist.com)
  • Early stages of wet gangrene may include signs of infection, aching pain with swelling, a reddish skin color or blanched appearance if the area is raised above level of the heart, coolness on the skin surface, ulceration, and a crackly sensation when the skin is pressed due to gas in the tissue. (rxlist.com)
  • The stages are similar to wet gangrene (see above), except there is no infection, pus, wetness, or crackly-feeling skin because there is no gas production in the uninfected tissue. (rxlist.com)
  • clots
  • Thromboembolism (blood clots) Embolism (foreign bodies in the circulation, e.g. amniotic fluid embolism) Traumatic injury to an extremity may produce partial or total occlusion of a vessel from compression, shearing or laceration. (wikipedia.org)
  • diabetes
  • Dry gangrene can result from conditions that reduce or block arterial blood flow such as diabetes , arteriosclerosis , and tobacco addiction as well as from trauma , frostbite , or injury. (rxlist.com)
  • Although the most common diseases that can cause dry gangrene are diabetes , arteriosclerosis, and tobacco addiction, there are many other lesser-known diseases that can lead to this problem. (rxlist.com)
  • Other organisms may occasionally cause gas gangrene (for example, Klebsiella pneumoniae in the context of diabetes). (wikipedia.org)
  • vascular
  • Usually, the progression of dry gangrene is much slower (days to months) than wet gangrene because the vascular compromise slowly develops due to the progression of diseases that can result in local arterial blockage over time. (rxlist.com)
  • chills
  • Here, fever and chills is common followed by confusion, nausea, vomiting and diarrhoea and sometimes fainting , which may be caused by low blood pressure . (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • oxygen
  • When the blood supply is cut off, the tissue does not get enough oxygen and begins to die. (doctors-hospital.net)
  • The thrombi may dislodge and may travel anywhere in the circulatory system, where they may lead to pulmonary embolus, an acute arterial occlusion causing the oxygen and blood supply distal to the embolus to decrease suddenly. (wikipedia.org)
  • Anemia vasoconstricts the periphery so that red blood cells can work internally on vital organs such as the heart, brain, etc., thus causing lack of oxygen to the periphery. (wikipedia.org)
  • arteries
  • If the kidney arteries are affected, high blood pressure or kidney failure results. (medical-library.net)
  • These complications include inflammation of the heart tissue (myocarditis), disturbances in heartbeat rhythm (arrhythmias), and areas of blood vessel dilation (aneurysms) in the coronary arteries. (encyclopedia.com)
  • There are terminal arteries in the fingers and pressure on them can shut off blood supply resulting in possible gangrene . (healthtap.com)
  • clot
  • Arterial embolism is a sudden interruption of blood flow to an organ or body part due to an embolus adhering to the wall of an artery blocking the flow of blood, the major type of embolus being a blood clot (thromboembolism). (wikipedia.org)
  • Sometimes, pulmonary embolism is classified as arterial embolism as well, in the sense that the clot follows the pulmonary artery carrying deoxygenated blood away from the heart. (wikipedia.org)
  • Arterial embolisms can consist of various materials, including: Thromboembolism - embolism of thrombus or blood clot. (wikipedia.org)
  • Risk Factors
  • What are the risk factors for developing gangrene? (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • Risk factors for thromboembolism, the major cause of arterial embolism, include disturbed blood flow (such as in atrial fibrillation and mitral stenosis), injury or damage to an artery wall, and hypercoagulability (such as increased platelet count). (wikipedia.org)
  • complications
  • Fluid imbalances upset the balance of specific essential chemicals (electrolytes) in the blood, which can cause complications such as irregular heartbeat and, without correction of the electrolyte imbalance, shock. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Clostridium
  • In wet gangrene, the tissue is infected by saprogenic microorganisms (Clostridium perfringens or Bacillus fusiformis, for example), which cause tissue to swell and emit a fetid smell. (wikipedia.org)
  • Gas gangrene is caused by exotoxin-producing Clostridium species (most often C. perfringens, and C. novyi, but less commonly C. septicum or C. ramnosum), which are mostly found in soil, but also found as normal gut flora, and other anaerobes (e.g. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is due to the lysis of neutrophils, a type of white blood cell, caused by the lecithinases and other toxins released by Clostridium species. (wikipedia.org)
  • fluid
  • Wet gangrene often produces an oozing fluid or pus, hence the term 'wet. (rxlist.com)
  • Dry gangrene often produces cool, dry, and discolored appendages (sometimes termed 'mummified') with no oozing fluid or pus, hence the term 'dry. (rxlist.com)