• insulin
  • If you take insulin or some other diabetes medicines, your blood glucose level can drop too low. (nih.gov)
  • According to WebMD, insulin is a hormone that is produced in the pancreas and assists the body's cells in using glucose. (reference.com)
  • Glucose can only enter a cell if insulin is present in the bloodstream as well, reports MNT. (reference.com)
  • For most patients, insulin (a hormone in the body) will stabilise blood glucose levels. (ehow.co.uk)
  • For patients with diabetes, you will need to take insulin injections or oral medications to regulate your blood sugar. (ehow.co.uk)
  • Cherries contain antioxidants that help insulin production, as well as being high in fibre, which will cause your blood sugar to stabilise while also having a sweet snack. (ehow.co.uk)
  • The Mayo Clinic generally recommends that diabetics who use insulin (all type 1 diabetics and many type 2 diabetics) test their blood sugar more often (4-8 times per day for type 1 diabetics, 2 or more times per day for type 2 diabetics), both to assess the effectiveness of their prior insulin dose and to help determine their next insulin dose. (wikipedia.org)
  • A typical system consists of: a disposable glucose sensor placed just under the skin, which is worn for a few days until replacement a link from the sensor to a non-implanted transmitter which communicates to a radio receiver an electronic receiver worn like a pager (or insulin pump) that displays glucose levels with nearly continuous updates, as well as monitors rising and falling trends. (wikipedia.org)
  • The metabolism of glucose and insulin are also influenced. (wikipedia.org)
  • An insulin pump is an alternative to multiple daily injections of insulin by insulin syringes or an insulin pen and allows for intensive insulin therapy when used in conjunction with blood glucose monitoring and carb counting. (wikipedia.org)
  • The use of rapid-acting insulin for basal needs offers relative freedom from a structured meal and exercise regime previously needed to control blood sugar with slow-acting insulin. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many modern "smart" pumps have a "bolus wizard" that calculates how much bolus insulin you need taking into account expected carbohydrate intake, blood sugar level, and still-active insulin. (wikipedia.org)
  • Therefore, pump users typically monitor their blood sugars more frequently to evaluate the effectiveness of insulin delivery. (wikipedia.org)
  • In some extreme cases the insulin delivery will appear to have no/little effect on lowering blood glucose levels and the site must be changed. (wikipedia.org)
  • It reduces meal-related hyperglycemia (for 24 hours after administration) by increasing insulin secretion (only) when required by increasing glucose levels, delaying gastric emptying, and suppressing prandial glucagon secretion. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some of these include: cell cultures chemical reactors cogeneration (power and heat) distillation columns drilling automation friction stir welding hydrate formation in deep-sea pipelines infectious disease spread oscillators severe slugging control solar thermal energy production solid oxide fuel cells space shuttle launch simulation Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) Models for a direct current (DC) motor and blood glucose response of an insulin dependent patient are listed below. (wikipedia.org)
  • In terms of the investigation of congenital hyperinsulinism, valuable diagnostic information is obtained from a blood sample drawn during hypoglycemia, detectable amounts of insulin during hypoglycemia are abnormal and indicate that hyperinsulinism is likely to be the cause. (wikipedia.org)
  • As the blood glucose level approaches normal, the amounts of insulin released and glucagon suppressed diminishes, thus tending to prevent an "overshoot" and subsequent low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) which is seen with some other oral hypoglycemic agents. (wikipedia.org)
  • Initial treatment generally consists of intravenous fluids to manage dehydration, intravenous insulin in those with significant ketones, low molecular weight heparin to decrease the risk of blood clotting, and antibiotics among those in whom there is concerns of infection. (wikipedia.org)
  • A relative insulin deficiency leads to a serum glucose that is usually higher than 33 mmol/L (600 mg/dL), and a resulting serum osmolarity that is greater than 320 mOsm. (wikipedia.org)
  • mmol
  • On average, each change of 3.3 mmol (60 mg/dl) in average blood sugar levels will give rise to changes of 1% HbA1c and 75 ┬Ámol fructosamine values. (wikipedia.org)
  • Diagnosis is based on blood tests finding a blood sugar greater than 30 mmol/L (600 mg/dL), osmolarity greater than 320 mOsm/kg, and a pH above 7.3. (wikipedia.org)
  • In contrast to DKA, serum glucose levels in HHS are extremely high, usually greater than 40-50 mmol/L (600 mg/dL). (wikipedia.org)
  • metabolic
  • While the causes of a hangover are still poorly understood, several factors are known to be involved including acetaldehyde accumulation, changes in the immune system and glucose metabolism, dehydration, metabolic acidosis, disturbed prostaglandin synthesis, increased cardiac output, vasodilation, sleep deprivation and malnutrition. (wikipedia.org)
  • The interdisciplinary "Selfish Brain: brain glucose and metabolic syndrome" research group headed by Peters and supported by the German Research Foundation (DFG) at the University of Luebeck has in the meantime been able to reinforce the basics of the theory through experimental research. (wikipedia.org)
  • diabetes mellitus
  • Hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (HHS) is a complication of diabetes mellitus in which high blood sugar results in high osmolarity without significant ketoacidosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Symptoms of HHS include: Altered level of consciousness Neurologic signs including: blurred vision, headaches, focal seizures, myoclonic jerking, reversible paralysis Motor abnormalities including flaccidity, depressed reflexes, tremors or fasiciculations Hyperviscosity and increased risk of blood clot formation Dehydration Weight loss Nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain Weakness Low blood pressure with standing The main risk factor is a history of diabetes mellitus type 2. (wikipedia.org)
  • protein
  • Since albumin is the most abundant protein in blood, fructosamine levels typically reflect albumin glycation. (wikipedia.org)
  • drops
  • Recent advances include:[citation needed] alternate site testing, the use of blood drops from places other than the finger, usually the palm or forearm. (wikipedia.org)
  • less
  • Both oats and barley will make you feel more full and produce less glucose than if you ate processed, bleached grains. (ehow.co.uk)
  • The disadvantage of this technique is that there is usually less blood flow to alternate sites, which prevents the reading from being accurate when the blood sugar level is changing. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is especially useful in controlling events such as the dawn phenomenon resulting in less low blood sugar during the night. (wikipedia.org)
  • decrease
  • Several pathophysiological changes may give rise to the alcohol hangover including increased levels of acetaldehyde, hormonal alterations of the cytokine pathways and decrease of the availability of glucose. (wikipedia.org)
  • increase
  • These foods turn into sugar quickly, making your glucose levels increase drastically. (ehow.co.uk)
  • This leads to excessive urination (more specifically an osmotic diuresis), which, in turn, leads to volume depletion and hemoconcentration that causes a further increase in blood glucose level. (wikipedia.org)