• vessels
  • A team of researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), has uncovered a set of genes that are turned on, or expressed, at high levels only in the blood vessels that feed tumors in mice and humans. (nih.gov)
  • These genes, and the proteins they encode, are important new potential targets for novel drugs that could selectively cut off a tumor's blood supply without affecting the blood vessels of healthy tissues, overcoming one of the major concerns of current anticancer therapies targeted at blood vessel growth. (nih.gov)
  • The growth of blood vessels, a process known as angiogenesis, is a normal process in the body that is essential for organ growth and repair. (nih.gov)
  • St. Croix and his colleagues focused on endothelial cells, which line the inner surface of blood vessels and are critical for new vascular growth. (nih.gov)
  • The researchers chose to analyze endothelial cells derived from mouse liver, because the liver can be induced to sprout new blood vessels when regenerating itself following partial surgical removal. (nih.gov)
  • They found that the CD276 protein was overexpressed in tumor-associated blood vessels from colon, lung, breast, esophageal and bladder cancers. (nih.gov)
  • In addition, the protein was also found to be frequently overexpressed by the tumor cells themselves, indicating that a suitable inhibitory molecule might be able to deliver a double blow -- one to the tumor cells themselves and the other to the blood vessels that feed them. (nih.gov)
  • These studies demonstrate that CD276 is overexpressed in the blood vessels of a variety of human cancers," says St. Croix. (nih.gov)
  • Therefore, it may be an important target for the development of new drugs that can selectively home in on blood vessels associated with disease. (nih.gov)
  • Blood is circulated around the body through blood vessels by the pumping action of the heart. (wikipedia.org)
  • donor
  • Adapting and developing donor selection criteria and other guidelines and standards documents in the context of South Sudan with fundamental principles and clear priority areas is vital to ensure a sufficient supply of safe blood and blood products to meet the needs of both the public and private hospitals. (who.int)
  • The blood of the donor, which is carefully screened to ensure its safety, must be compatible with the blood type of the person receiving it. (kidshealth.org)
  • Blood from a donor needs to match the blood type of the person receiving it. (kidshealth.org)
  • For directed donation, the donor must have a blood type that is compatible with the recipient's. (kidshealth.org)
  • He or she must also meet all the requirements of a regular volunteer blood donor. (kidshealth.org)
  • sickle
  • Characteristic red blood cell abnormalities are anemia , sickle cell anemia and spherocytosis . (wikipedia.org)
  • To prevent complications from an existing blood or bleeding disorder , such as sickle cell disease , thalassemia, or anemia caused by kidney disease , hemophilia , or von Willebrand disease . (kidshealth.org)
  • Knot
  • A blood knot (barrel knot) is most usefully employed for joining sections of monofilament nylon line while maintaining a high portion of the line's inherent strength. (wikipedia.org)
  • The principal drawback to the blood knot is the dexterity required to tie it. (wikipedia.org)
  • Blood knot" may refer to, "a double overhand knot tied in a cat-o'-nine-tails. (wikipedia.org)
  • The barrel knot, called blood knot by Keith Rollo, is the best bend there is for small, stiff or slippery line. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Ashley Book of Knots A half blood knot (also clinch knot) is a knot that is used for securing a fishing line to a fishing lure, snap or swivel. (wikipedia.org)
  • When two half blood knots are used to join two lines they are considered as one knot and called a blood knot. (wikipedia.org)
  • A half blood knot is one of the strongest knots for tying a medium-size hook to a medium-size line such as hooksize 4 to 4/0 onto line size 6 lb to 30 lb. (wikipedia.org)
  • In tying the blood knot, the two lines to be joined are overlapped for 6-8 cm with the short ends of the two lines in opposite directions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Video instructions on how to tie a half blood knot Video instructions for tying a Blood Knot Grog. (wikipedia.org)
  • Blood Knot is an early play by South African playwright, actor, and director Athol Fugard. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lucille Lortel produced The Blood Knot, starring J.D. Cannon as Morris and James Earl Jones as Zachariah, at the Cricket Theatre, Off Broadway, in New York City, in 1964, "launch[ing]" Fugard's "American career. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fugard was pleased with the results: Back in S'Kop after five weeks in London for BBC TV production of The Blood Knot. (wikipedia.org)
  • In Time magazine, the same performance was reviewed by Pulitzer Prize-winning critic William A. Henry III, who notices the long collaboration between the two actors, Fugard and Mokae: "The actors' blood knot of decades of fraternal friendship has only ripened their truth onstage. (wikipedia.org)
  • sangre
  • Eternal Blood (originally Sangre Eterna) is a 2002 Chilean vampire-horror film directed by Jorge Olguín, written by Carolina García and Olguín, and starring Blanca Lewin, Juan Pablo Ogalde, Patricia López, and Claudio Espinoza. (wikipedia.org)
  • chills
  • This aggressive, whole-body response can give someone a fever, chills, and low blood pressure. (kidshealth.org)
  • AllMovie's review of the film was mixed, writing, "Blood Song is dumb fun for those in the market for such and there is perverse enjoyment in watching Avalon's inexplicable performance, but don't expect chills or logic. (wikipedia.org)
  • diseases
  • In many diseases, including most forms of cancer, this carefully regulated process becomes imbalanced, and normal blood vessel growth is redirected toward supplying nutrients and oxygen to feed diseased tissue, destroy normal tissues, and in the case of cancer, allow tumor cells to escape and travel to distant sites in the body. (nih.gov)
  • Some people worry about getting diseases from infected blood, but the United States has one of the safest blood supplies in the world. (kidshealth.org)
  • So, each unit of blood goes through many tests to check for infectious diseases and establish the blood type. (kidshealth.org)
  • The main concern addressed by this rule is the spread of infectious diseases like Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), Hepatitis, and other diseases that can be spread through the contact of blood. (wikipedia.org)
  • coagulation
  • Serum includes all proteins not used in blood clotting (coagulation) and all the electrolytes, antibodies, antigens, hormones, and any exogenous substances (e.g., drugs and microorganisms). (wikipedia.org)
  • plasma
  • Plasma , the pale yellow liquid part of whole blood. (kidshealth.org)
  • But although all blood contains the same basic components (red cells, white cells, platelets, and plasma), not everyone has the same types of markers on the surface of their red blood cells. (kidshealth.org)
  • About 55% of our blood is plasma. (kidshealth.org)
  • In vertebrates, it is composed of blood cells suspended in blood plasma. (wikipedia.org)
  • Albumin is the main protein in plasma, and it functions to regulate the colloidal osmotic pressure of blood. (wikipedia.org)
  • The average adult has a blood volume of roughly 5 litres (11 US pt), which is composed of plasma and several kinds of cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Whole blood (plasma and cells) exhibits non-Newtonian fluid dynamics. (wikipedia.org)
  • Human blood fractioned by centrifugation: Plasma (upper, yellow layer), buffy coat (middle, thin white layer) and erythrocyte layer (bottom, red layer) can be seen. (wikipedia.org)
  • About 55% of blood is blood plasma, a fluid that is the blood's liquid medium, which by itself is straw-yellow in color. (wikipedia.org)
  • it is the blood plasma not including the fibrinogens. (wikipedia.org)
  • Anti-coagulated blood yields plasma containing fibrinogen and clotting factors. (wikipedia.org)
  • Blood serum and plasma are some of the largest sources of biomarkers, whether for diagnostics or therapeutics. (wikipedia.org)
  • vampire
  • But the flip side is that vampire blood (or "V juice") can prove useful to humans, particularly as an aphrodisiac. (angelfire.com)
  • Pale Blood is a 1990 direct-to-video vampire film directed by V.V. Dachin Hsu and Michael W. Leighton. (wikipedia.org)
  • vessel
  • Researchers have tried to stop disease-related angiogenesis by identifying the molecules that stimulate blood vessel and developing new drugs to block their action. (nih.gov)
  • However, blocking angiogenesis requires a delicate balance between tumor and normal cells as most angiogenesis-related molecules are also critical for normal blood vessel growth in the body - for example, during menstruation, pregnancy, or tissue repair. (nih.gov)
  • The red blood cells (together with endothelial vessel cells and other cells) are also marked by glycoproteins that define the different blood types. (wikipedia.org)
  • kidneys
  • For example, a urinary tract infection may spread from the bladder and/or kidneys into the blood and then be carried throughout the body, infecting other organs and causing a serious and sometimes life-threatening systemic infection. (labtestsonline.org)
  • body's
  • Septicemia refers to an infection of the blood while sepsis is the body's serious, overwhelming, and sometimes life-threatening response to infection. (labtestsonline.org)
  • Blood is like the body's transportation system. (kidshealth.org)
  • The combined surface area of all red blood cells of the human body would be roughly 2,000 times as great as the body's exterior surface. (wikipedia.org)
  • fibrinogen
  • In terms of anatomy and histology, blood is considered a specialized form of connective tissue, given its origin in the bones and the presence of potential molecular fibers in the form of fibrinogen. (wikipedia.org)
  • Coagulated blood (clotted blood) yields serum without fibrinogen, although some clotting factors remain. (wikipedia.org)
  • proteins
  • These markers (also called antigens ) are proteins and sugars that our bodies use to identify the blood cells as belonging in our own system. (kidshealth.org)
  • donation
  • In addition, the American Red Cross and other donation groups test donated blood for viruses like HIV (the virus that causes AIDS), hepatitis B, hepatitis C, syphilis, and West Nile virus. (kidshealth.org)
  • parasites
  • Blood films are examined in the investigation of hematological (blood) disorders and are routinely employed to look for blood parasites , such as those of malaria and filariasis . (wikipedia.org)
  • White blood cells help to resist infections and parasites. (wikipedia.org)
  • pale
  • Pale Blood was released on VHS by IMV in Germany in 1990, and by RCA/Columbia Pictures Home Video in the US in 1992. (wikipedia.org)
  • TV Guide said, "PALE BLOOD positively aches to do something original with the lore of the undead. (wikipedia.org)
  • infection
  • Blood cultures are procedures done to detect an infection in the blood and identify the cause. (labtestsonline.org)
  • Other serious complications can result from an infection of the blood. (labtestsonline.org)
  • Thick films allow the microscopist to screen a larger volume of blood and are about eleven times more sensitive than the thin film, so picking up low levels of infection is easier on the thick film, but the appearance of the parasite is much more distorted and therefore distinguishing between the different species can be much more difficult. (wikipedia.org)
  • nitrogen
  • Blood meal is a dry, inert powder made from blood used as a high-nitrogen organic fertilizer and a high protein animal feed. (wikipedia.org)
  • Blood meal is different from bone meal in that blood meal contains a higher amount of nitrogen, while bone meal contains phosphorus. (wikipedia.org)
  • magnesium
  • Magnesium is a mineral involved in more than 300 bodily processes, including blood sugar control ( 17 ). (healthline.com)
  • It turns out that 25-38% of type 2 diabetics are deficient in magnesium, and correcting the deficiency significantly lowers blood sugar levels and improves the function of insulin ( 18 , 19 , 20 ). (healthline.com)
  • The magnesium in almonds may also help to lower blood pressure levels. (healthline.com)
  • A deficiency in magnesium is strongly linked to blood pressure problems, regardless of whether you are overweight or not ( 23 , 24 , 25 ). (healthline.com)
  • respiratory
  • These contain hemoglobin, an iron-containing protein, which facilitates oxygen transport by reversibly binding to this respiratory gas and greatly increasing its solubility in blood. (wikipedia.org)
  • white
  • White blood cells are classified according to their propensity to stain with particular substances, the shape of the nuclei and the granular inclusions. (wikipedia.org)
  • The blood cells are mainly red blood cells (also called RBCs or erythrocytes), white blood cells (also called WBCs or leukocytes) and platelets (also called thrombocytes). (wikipedia.org)
  • These blood cells (which are also called corpuscles or "formed elements") consist of erythrocytes (red blood cells, RBCs), leukocytes (white blood cells), and thrombocytes (platelets). (wikipedia.org)
  • cells
  • A blood film -or peripheral blood smear -is a thin layer of blood smeared on a glass microscope slide and then stained in such a way as to allow the various blood cells to be examined microscopically. (wikipedia.org)
  • Several red blood cells have ring stages inside them. (wikipedia.org)
  • Red blood cells, the most commonly transfused part, are used to increase the blood's ability to carry oxygen and prevent tiredness and other complications. (kidshealth.org)
  • There are four major blood types, each with a different chemical marker that's attached to a person's red blood cells. (kidshealth.org)
  • The blood cells in this type have both A and B markers. (kidshealth.org)
  • If a patient is given the wrong blood type, the antibodies immediately set out to destroy the invading cells. (kidshealth.org)
  • If you have both A and B markers on the surface of your cells (Type AB blood), your body does not need to fight the presence of either. (kidshealth.org)
  • But if you have Type O blood, meaning your red blood cells have neither A or B markers, your body will have both A and B antibodies and will therefore feel the need to defend itself against A, B, and AB blood. (kidshealth.org)
  • Blood is a mixture of cells and liquid. (kidshealth.org)
  • Blood cells are made in the bone marrow (a spongy material inside many of the bones in the body). (kidshealth.org)
  • Blood is a body fluid in humans and other animals that delivers necessary substances such as nutrients and oxygen to the cells and transports metabolic waste products away from those same cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • The most abundant cells in vertebrate blood are red blood cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Right tube: Freshly drawn blood One microliter of blood contains: 4.7 to 6.1 million (male), 4.2 to 5.4 million (female) erythrocytes: Red blood cells contain the blood's hemoglobin and distribute oxygen. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mature red blood cells lack a nucleus and organelles in mammals. (wikipedia.org)
  • bone
  • Blood meal, bone meal, and other animal by-products are permitted in certified organic production as soil amendments, though they cannot be fed to organic livestock. (wikipedia.org)
  • Types
  • O positive blood is one of the two most common blood types (the other being A positive). (kidshealth.org)
  • Along with O positive, it's one of the two most common blood types. (kidshealth.org)
  • Blood type O negative is the only type of blood that people of all other blood types can receive. (kidshealth.org)
  • This is one of many types of blood sausage, likely with a large amount of added bacon . (wikipedia.org)
  • The slaughtered goat, cow or sheep has its blood collected to use in the stuffing, though today many types of mutura, especially commercial ones sold on the streets do not contain blood. (wikipedia.org)
  • main
  • Because each of the four main blood groups (A, B, AB, and O) may or may not have Rh factor, scientists further classify blood as either "positive" (meaning it has Rh factor) or "negative" (without Rh factor). (kidshealth.org)
  • samples
  • Samples of human blood collected for testing. (wikipedia.org)
  • For analysis of biomarkers in blood serum samples, it is possible to do a pre-separation by free-flow electrophoresis that usually consists of a depletion of serum albumin protein. (wikipedia.org)
  • medical
  • For these reasons, blood tests are the most commonly performed medical tests . (wikipedia.org)
  • Routine analysis of blood in medical laboratories is usually performed on blood films stained with Romanowsky , Wright's , or Giemsa stain. (wikipedia.org)
  • The blood rule is a rule used in many sports that states that an athlete that receives an open wound, is bleeding, or who has blood on them or their clothes, must immediately leave the playing area to receive medical attention. (wikipedia.org)
  • help
  • Can eating more whole-grain foods help lower my blood pressure? (mayoclinic.org)
  • Eating more whole-grain foods on a regular basis might help reduce your chance of developing high blood pressure (hypertension). (mayoclinic.org)
  • If you already have high blood pressure, eating more whole-grain foods might help lower your blood pressure. (mayoclinic.org)
  • supply
  • Many organizations, including community blood banks and the federal government, work hard to make sure that the blood supply is safe. (kidshealth.org)
  • It's very important to keep the blood supply safe. (kidshealth.org)
  • Most patients choose to receive blood from the donated supply, but some decide to use their own blood. (kidshealth.org)
  • Blood meal can be used as a livestock dietary supplement and is mainly added to supply dietary lysine for cattle, fish and poultry. (wikipedia.org)
  • sometimes
  • Pig's blood was sometimes added to produce boudin rouge , but this tradition became increasingly rare after the mid-twentieth century due to the decline of the boucherie (traditional communal butchering) and government health regulations prohibiting the transportation of raw blood. (wikipedia.org)
  • Blood meal is sometimes used as a composting activator. (wikipedia.org)