• Willful
  • Willful blindness (sometimes called ignorance of law, willful ignorance or contrived ignorance or Nelsonian knowledge) is a term used in law to describe a situation in which a person seeks to avoid civil or criminal liability for a wrongful act by intentionally keeping himself or herself unaware of facts that would render him or her liable. (wikipedia.org)
  • Willful blindness is a term used in law to describe a situation in which a person seeks to avoid civil or criminal liability for a wrongful act by intentionally keeping oneself unaware of facts that would render liability. (wikipedia.org)
  • The court held that this was willful blindness on the defendant's part and would not constitute a defense to a claim of contributory infringement. (wikipedia.org)
  • tasks
  • Lesion studies show that when lesions are imposed to the medial frontal lobe, performance on mentalization tasks is reduced, similar to typical mind-blindness cases. (wikipedia.org)
  • sudden
  • Because vision loss is sudden and takes time to recover, flash blindness can be hazardous. (wikipedia.org)
  • The sudden onset and unexplained origin and nature of the blindness cause widespread panic, and the social order rapidly unravels as the government attempts to contain the apparent contagion and keep order via increasingly repressive and inept measures. (wikipedia.org)
  • The sudden blindness, known as the "white sickness", is now international, with hundreds of cases reported every day. (wikipedia.org)
  • cognitive
  • It is critical to acknowledge that occurrences of inattentional blindness are attributed to the failure to consciously attend to an item in the visual field as opposed the absence of cognitive processing. (wikipedia.org)
  • Findings such as inattentional blindness - the failure to notice a fully visible but unexpected object because attention was engaged on another task, event, or object - has changed views on how the brain stores and integrates visual information, and has led to further questioning and investigation of the brain and importantly of cognitive processes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mind-blindness is a cognitive disorder where an individual is unable to attribute mental states to others. (wikipedia.org)
  • patients
  • Patients with cortical blindness will not be able to identify the item being questioned about at all or will not be able to provide any details other than color or perhaps general shape. (wikipedia.org)
  • In patients with acquired cortical blindness, a permanent complete loss of vision is rare. (wikipedia.org)
  • Furthermore, some patients regain vision completely, as is the case with transient cortical blindness associated with eclampsia and the side effects of certain anti-epilepsy drugs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Such an ability to develop a mental awareness of what is in the other minds is known as the theory of mind (ToM), and the "Mind-blindness" Theory asserts that children who delay in this development often are or will be autistic and Asperger's syndrome (AS) patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • Patients that experienced frontal lobe injuries due to severe head trauma showed signs of mind blindness, as a result of a lost ToM. (wikipedia.org)
  • People
  • So usually people are either looking for more information to learn about color blindness and all its details , would like to better understand the vision by simulating it or want to test themselves with some form of color blindness test . (color-blindness.com)
  • Because schlep blindness prevented people from even considering the idea of fixing payments. (paulgraham.com)
  • Many people who dread blindness imagine having no perception of light in each eye. (springer.com)
  • The urgent mission of the Foundation Fighting Blindness is to drive the research that will provide preventions, treatments and cures for people affected by retinitis pigmentosa, age-related macular degeneration, Usher syndrome and the entire spectrum of retinal degenerative diseases. (blindness.org)
  • The Foundation Fighting Blindness thanks our partners for helping to bring hope and results to people affected by retinal degenerative diseases. (blindness.org)
  • Special lenses may help people with red-green color blindness when under bright conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • occur
  • The cells of the ACC develops at the age of 4 months suggesting that the manifestations of mind-blindness may occur around this time. (wikipedia.org)
  • exposure
  • Flash blindness, in contrast, is caused by a single very brief exposure which oversaturates the retina, and is not usually accompanied by reports of pain. (wikipedia.org)
  • content
  • Advocates for color blindness argue that persons should be judged not by their skin color but rather by "the content of their character", in the words of Martin Luther King Jr. Color-blind ideology is based on tenets of non-discrimination, due process of law, equal protection under the law, and equal opportunities regardless of race, ideas which have strongly influenced Western liberalism in the post-World War II period. (wikipedia.org)
  • different
  • There are three main kinds of color blindness, based on photopigment defects in the three different kinds of cones that respond to blue, green, and red light. (nih.gov)
  • From achromatopsia to population statistics, from red-green color blindness to different types of tests. (color-blindness.com)
  • This means that the ophthalmologist may not have personal experience of the size of the problem and may not be in a position to experience the relative incidences of different causes of blindness. (springer.com)
  • transform
  • By acquiring genetic mutations, Chlamydia trachomatis, which causes the sexually transmitted infection, can transform into a strain causing blindness. (medicaldaily.com)
  • development
  • This development in change blindness research was able to show the effects of change blindness in more realistic settings. (wikipedia.org)
  • Melanie Klein saw early development in terms of the child slowly emerging from a state of narcissistic blindness to recognise the motherer as a moral end in herself, not simply as the child's means or tool-a step she called the depressive position. (wikipedia.org)
  • research
  • Driving Research - Saving Sight - read about the research and fundraising efforts helping to end blindness in the Foundation Fighting Blindness' 2017 Annual Report. (blindness.org)
  • Research on change blindness developed from investigation in other phenomena such as eye movements and working memory. (wikipedia.org)
  • This was a critical contribution to change blindness research because it demonstrated that a change can remain unnoticed with the smallest disruptions. (wikipedia.org)
  • In addition to autism and AS, ToM and mind-blindness research has recently been extended to other disorders such as schizophrenia, dementia, bipolar disorders, antisocial personality disorders as well as normal aging. (wikipedia.org)
  • film
  • Love's Blindness is a 1926 silent film directed by John Francis Dillon. (wikipedia.org)
  • Blindness premiered as the opening film at the Cannes Film Festival on May 14, 2008, and the film was released in the United States on October 3, 2008. (wikipedia.org)
  • light
  • While it is caused by bright light as is flash blindness, the welder's arc lasts for much longer than a flash, and emits ultraviolet rays that can damage the cornea. (wikipedia.org)
  • total
  • Cortical blindness is the total or partial loss of vision in a normal-appearing eye caused by damage to the brain's occipital cortex. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is suspected that the damage to the orbitofrontal cortex brings upon subtle impairments, but not a total loss of the ToM that would to mind-blindness. (wikipedia.org)
  • effect
  • At night, the dark-adapted pupil is wide open so flash blindness has a greater effect and lasts longer. (wikipedia.org)
  • A study by Rensink, O'Regan, & Clarke demonstrated that change blindness can have an effect even if the eye was fixated on a scene. (wikipedia.org)
  • Numerous experiments have demonstrated that inattentional blindness also has an effect on people's perception. (wikipedia.org)
  • result
  • Color blindness can also result from physical or chemical damage to the eye, optic nerve, or parts of the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • The term "banner blindness" was coined by Benway and Lane as a result of website usability tests where a majority of the test subjects either consciously or unconsciously ignored information that was presented in banners. (wikipedia.org)
  • state
  • Moral blindness is a state of unawareness or insensibility to moral issues pertaining both to oneself and to one's relations to others. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mind-blindness is a state where the ToM has not been developed, or has been lost in an individual. (wikipedia.org)
  • change
  • Change blindness has become a highly researched topic and some have argued that it may have important practical implications in areas such as eyewitness testimony and distractions while driving. (wikipedia.org)
  • Outside of the domain of psychology, phenomena related to change blindness have been discussed since the 19th century. (wikipedia.org)
  • failure
  • Blindness marks the failure or inefficacy of ophthalmological treatment. (springer.com)
  • Despite the fact that ToM and mind-blindness can explain executive function deficits, it is argued that autism is not identified with the failure of the executive function. (wikipedia.org)
  • city
  • it concerns the social breakdown that occurs after much of the population in a European city is inexplicably stricken with blindness and placed into quarantine. (variety.com)
  • The doctor and his wife and their new "family" eventually make a permanent home in the doctor's house and are establishing a new order to their lives when the blindness lifts from the city en masse just as suddenly and inexplicably as it struck. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sometimes
  • Sometimes color blindness can be caused by physical or chemical damage to the eye, the optic nerve, or parts of the brain that process color information. (nih.gov)