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  • infants
  • In comparison with infants born vaginally, those born by planned c-section were at increased risk of asthma requiring hospital admission and using an inhaler prescription at the age of 5. (babycenter.com)
  • A 1999 study conducted in Finland found that the primary gut flora in infants born by cesarean delivery may be disturbed for up to six months after birth. (babycenter.com)
  • Objective To determine respiratory rate (RR), tidal volume (TV) and end-tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO 2 ) values in full-term infants immediately after caesarean section, and to assess whether infants that develop transient tachypnoea of the newborn (TTN) follow the same physiological patterns. (bmj.com)
  • RR increases gradually from birth, and rates were lower in infants that develop TTN. (bmj.com)
  • In particular, infants born following planned birth before the optimal time of birth were more likely to have poor child development. (medindia.net)
  • The device, which was sometimes known as a "hand ambulance", allowed premature infants to be transported to a hospital following a home birth. (wikipedia.org)
  • Preterm birth is the most common cause of death among infants worldwide. (wikipedia.org)
  • obstetricians
  • There are several ways that obstetricians and other doctors diagnose conditions that may make a c-section necessary. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists recommends that women with a prior history of one classical (longitudinal) caesarean section should give birth by elective repeat caesarean section (ERCS). (wikipedia.org)
  • Even where vaginal birth is possibly safer option, obstetricians increasingly choose the surgical procedure as a legally safe alternative. (abrahamwatkins.com)
  • Though he was an obstetrician rather than a pediatrician, DeLee became the greatest advocate of the infant incubator in the U.S. At that time, obstetricians dealt with the problems of the premature baby after birth, where pediatricians were likely to only see the survivors of prematurity many days later. (wikipedia.org)
  • fetal
  • Fetal distress is often related to abnormalities in the position of the fetus or abnormalities in the birth canal, causing reduced blood flow through the placenta. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • vaginally
  • A retrospective survey of patients with one previous caesarean section delivered at the Port Moresby General Hospital: a comparative study of those delivered vaginally and those delivered by repeat caesarean section. (biomedsearch.com)
  • The goal of this procedure is to give birth vaginally, rather than through an elective C-section. (medicalcityhospital.com)
  • At 7 years of age, significantly higher numbers of clostridia (a type of bacteria) were found in children delivered vaginally compared with c-section-born children. (babycenter.com)
  • Compared to children born vaginally following spontaneous labor, the combined adjusted relative risk of being 'developmentally high risk' was 26 percent higher for a planned birth at 37 weeks and 13 percent higher at 38 weeks. (medindia.net)
  • gestational age
  • The study's senior author, Associate Professor Natasha Nassar from the University of Sydney Menzies Centre for Health Policy said: "While the association between being born earlier - lower gestational age - and poorer developmental outcomes is well established, our results revealed that poor development is further exacerbated in the case of planned birth, where a considered decision made to deliver an infant determines gestational age. (medindia.net)
  • At a population level this has resulted in a decrease in modal gestational age with planned birth accounting for almost half of births before 39-40 weeks. (medindia.net)
  • World Health Organ
  • Until recently the World Health Organization (WHO) recommended a Cesarean prevalence of 5 percent to 10 percent, with an upper limit of 15 percent, to optimize maternal and child health (World Health Organization 1985). (jhu.edu)
  • labor
  • Thus, they felt justified in denying a trial of labor (TOL) to women with more than one prior cesarean. (plus-size-pregnancy.org)
  • Furthermore, the Caughey study was extremely small (only 134 trials of labor after 2 cesareans), leading to the possibility that the risk was inflated due to inadequate numbers in the VBA2C group. (plus-size-pregnancy.org)
  • Dystocia, or difficult labor, is the other common cause of c-sections. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • When a c-section is being considered because labor is not progressing, the mother should first be encouraged to walk around to stimulate labor. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The second most common reason that a c-section is performed (in 30% of all cases) is difficult childbirth due to nonprogressive labor (dystocia). (thefreedictionary.com)
  • In cases where labor occurs naturally before 39 weeks or planned birth is unavoidable, it is important that there are appropriate interventions and support in early childhood for these potentially vulnerable children. (medindia.net)
  • In total, 70% of the women who attempted labor in 2013 after a previous cesarean had successful VBACs, the CDC data shows. (mdedge.com)
  • The most common indications are a trapped head of a breech baby, shoulder dystocia which does not resolve with routine manoeuvres, and obstructed labor at full cervical dilation when there is no option of a caesarean section. (wikipedia.org)
  • suggests
  • The resulting dichotomy of provision suggests that Cesareans are no longer deemed an emergent medical procedure by much of the world, and in some contexts they are C-Sections as a Nefarious Plot 123 used electively, on the basis of the physician's preference, the woman's preference , or both. (jhu.edu)
  • Rise
  • As the trend of increasing c-sections continues to rise, so does an epidemic of both autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes, Crohn's disease and multiple sclerosis, and allergic diseases including asthma, allergic rhinitis and atopic dermatitis. (babycenter.com)
  • rates
  • These counties usually have a small number of births and deaths, which may create very unstable rates. (ncdcr.gov)
  • In many countries rates of premature births have increased between the 1990s and 2010s. (wikipedia.org)
  • practice
  • They became less frequent in the late 20th century after the risk of maternal death post-caesarean section decreased due to improvement in techniques, hygiene, and clinical practice. (wikipedia.org)
  • baby
  • Moments later, the patient gave birth to a healthy baby girl. (iran-daily.com)
  • If the baby is in another position the birth may be complicated. (wikipedia.org)
  • For instance, the baby might not get enough oxygen during the birth. (wikipedia.org)
  • Unfortunately Chrissie went into premature labour and Owen had to deliver the baby by caesarean section but she was born with brain damage so Chrissie only had a few minutes with her before she died. (wikipedia.org)
  • Tiffany gives birth to baby Courtney by Caesarean section in March 1997, and for a moment Grant softens towards his wife. (wikipedia.org)
  • A breech birth occurs when a baby is born bottom first instead of head first. (wikipedia.org)
  • Further, only a quarter of women who suffer a fistula in their first birth are able to have a living baby, and therefore have minuscule chances of conceiving a healthy baby later on. (wikipedia.org)
  • A review into using uterine monitoring at home to detect contractions and possible preterm births in women at higher risk of having a preterm baby found that it did not reduce the number of preterm births. (wikipedia.org)
  • medical
  • Although the origins of the Cesarean date back well before the 1800s, the procedure became largely successful at decreasing maternal and infant mortality only toward the latter half of the nineteenth century, with the onset of medical techniques such as stitching the uterine incision and providing anesthesia during the procedure (Van Dongen 2009). (jhu.edu)
  • therefore nations that provide substantial numbers of Cesareans require additional funding for a medical procedure that, in many cases, is not needed (Gibbons et al. (jhu.edu)
  • Some C-sections are performed without a medical reason, upon request by someone, usually the mother. (wikipedia.org)
  • Doctors' fears of medical malpractice lawsuits have led to an increasing number of unnecessary repeat cesarean sections. (abrahamwatkins.com)
  • In 1912, the Journal of the American Medical Association published an article written by Harrison, titled "Cesarean Section Under Difficulties", which documented a caesarean section he performed in a remote ranch-house lit by an oil lamp. (wikipedia.org)