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  • neurons
  • This mediates high frequency firing due to the phosphorylation sites located within the channel via kinases and a major calcium influx typical of all neurons. (wikipedia.org)
  • genes
  • Luciferases are widely used in biotechnology, for microscopy and as reporter genes, for many of the same applications as fluorescent proteins. (wikipedia.org)
  • kinetics
  • Effects of these calcium buffers are determined by their affinities for Ca 2+ ions and by the kinetics (on and off rates) of binding and releasing of Ca 2+ . (pnas.org)
  • sequence
  • Note that the 'protein existence' evidence does not give information on the accuracy or correctness of the sequence(s) displayed. (uniprot.org)
  • addition
  • However, unlike fluorescent proteins, luciferases do not require an external light source, but do require addition of luciferin, the consumable substrate. (wikipedia.org)
  • different
  • p>When browsing through different UniProt proteins, you can use the 'basket' to save them, so that you can back to find or analyse them later. (uniprot.org)
  • given
  • be used as a measure of the accuracy of the annotation as we cannot define the 'correct annotation' for any given protein. (uniprot.org)
  • excited state
  • Light emission in some bioluminescent bacteria utilizes 'antenna' such as 'lumazine protein' to accept the energy from the primary excited state on the luciferase, resulting in an excited lulnazine chromophore which emits light that is of a shorter wavelength (more blue), while in others use a yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) with FMN as the chromophore and emits light that is red-shifted relative to that from luciferase. (wikipedia.org)
  • association
  • PV is in this regard interesting because it has a slow dissociation rate (about 1 s −1 ) and a slow apparent association rate (about 10 7 M −1 ⋅s −1 ), due to the fact that Mg 2+ ions compete with Ca 2+ ions for binding. (pnas.org)