• focal
  • We discuss the case of a 6-year-old girl with a positive family history for epilepsy, early benign focal epilepsy, well controlled by Carbamazepine, upper limb tremor since birth, ataxia, slight motor delay and normal cognitive development. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • prognosis
  • Although the prognosis of neonatal convulsions remains poor, benign neonatal convulsions are differentiated by their generally good prognosis. (medscape.com)
  • About three fourths of patients achieve control of the disease with the use of antiepileptic drugs, however, despite this benign prognosis, over 75% of patients from low income populations do not receive treatment at all. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • hereditary
  • 358) Myoneural disorders (358.0) Myasthenia gravis (358.01) Myasthenia gravis without (acute) exacerbation (358.02) Myasthenia gravis with (acute) exacerbation (358.1) Myasthenic syndromes in diseases classified elsewhere (358.2) Toxic myoneural disorders (358.8) Other specified myoneural disorders (358.9) Myoneural disorders unspecified (359) Muscular dystrophies and other myopathies (359.0) Congenital hereditary myopathies, including: Benign congenital myopathy Central core disease Centronuclear myopathy Myotubular myopathy Nemaline body disease (359.1) Muscular dyst. (wikipedia.org)
  • incidence
  • The incidence and prevalence of epilepsy in low income populations is higher than in the rest of the world, this is partly explained by some risk factors such as head trauma, perinatal injury and CNS infections, which are more common in poor regions, especially in rural areas. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • The incidence of epilepsy is relatively constant among different ethnic groups and similar between genders. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Very Common (>10% incidence) adverse effects of lithium include Confusion Constipation (usually transient, but can persist in some) Decreased memory Diarrhea (usually transient, but can persist in some) Dry mouth EKG changes - usually benign changes in T waves. (wikipedia.org)
  • vestibular
  • The reflex uses a combination of visual system inputs, vestibular inputs, and somatosensory inputs to make postural adjustments when the body becomes displaced from its normal vertical position. (wikipedia.org)
  • The section below is an overview of the vestibular system, as it is crucial to the understanding of the righting reflex. (wikipedia.org)
  • cognitive
  • Meningitis can lead to serious long-term consequences such as deafness, epilepsy, hydrocephalus, or cognitive deficits, especially if not treated quickly. (wikipedia.org)
  • NEURONTIN
  • Clinical studies of NEURONTIN in epilepsy did not include sufficient numbers of subjects aged 65 and over to determine whether they responded differently from younger subjects. (fioricetpain.com)
  • cerebral
  • Epilepsy is more common than Parkinson's disease , multiple sclerosis , cerebral palsy , and muscular dystrophy all combined. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Cortical reflex myoclonus is thought to be a type of epilepsy that originates in the cerebral cortex - the outer layer, or "gray matter," of the brain, responsible for much of the information processing that takes place in the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • patients
  • Cortical reflex myoclonus can be intensified when patients attempt to move in a certain way or perceive a particular sensation. (wikipedia.org)
  • condition
  • Epilepsy is considered a treatable condition with high rates of therapeutic response. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • Although Hippocrates , in roughly 400 b.c., referred to epilepsy as the sacred disease, he did so to emphasize the general public's superstitious view of the condition. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Following organizations serve the condition "Mental retardation epilepsy" for support, advocacy or research. (diseaseinfosearch.org)
  • People with epilepsy in some areas of the world experience varying degrees of social stigma due to their condition. (wikipedia.org)
  • Epilepsy can often be confirmed with an electroencephalogram (EEG), but a normal test does not rule out the condition. (wikipedia.org)
  • known
  • The righting reflex, also known as the Labyrinthine righting reflex, is a reflex that corrects the orientation of the body when it is taken out of its normal upright position. (wikipedia.org)
  • brain
  • The famous English neurologist John Hughlings Jackson explained epilepsy as "a sudden, excessive, and rapid discharge of gray matter of some part of the brain" that would correspond to the patient's experience. (encyclopedia.com)