• identifies
  • In the process of best practice benchmarking, management identifies the best firms in their industry, or in another industry where similar processes exist, and compares the results and processes of those studied (the "targets") to one's own results and processes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cost benchmarking identifies competitiveness of pricing in industry terms, highlighting best in class pricing and subsequently showing areas for competitive pricing improvement. (wikipedia.org)
  • organizations
  • Also referred to as "best practice benchmarking" or "process benchmarking", this process is used in management which particularly shows VEMR strategic management, in which organizations evaluate various aspects of their processes in relation to best practice companies' processes, usually within a peer group defined for the purposes of comparison. (wikipedia.org)
  • Topics covered in BIJ include: Benchmarking as part of total quality Case histories Practical applications Research reports Test scenarios The theory of benchmarking BIJ will be of interest to academics and students studying quality and related areas, consultants to organizations looking at total quality, and senior company personnel in business and industry responsible for the development and managing of total quality programmes. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2017
  • Credit Benchmark was selected in the 2015, 2016 and 2017 Fintech50 awards Credit Benchmark was established in 2012 by Mark Faulkner, founder of Data Explorers and the author of the Guide to Securities Lending Markets, and Donal Smith, formerly CEO of Data Explorers which sold to Markit in 2012. (wikipedia.org)
  • process
  • The process from the benchmark installation, to the actual benchmarking, to the parsing of important hardware and software components is heavily automated and completely repeatable, asking users only for confirmation of actions. (archlinux.org)
  • Keeping in mind its broad mandate to conduct benchmarking interviews with "government agencies, university research groups, and private service providers" who have successfully engaged in the use of business process analysis and systems development in support of electronic recordkeeping, the Benchmarking Team reviewed the project parameters, the benchmarking process, and potential benchmarking sites during the First Quarter of Fiscal Year 2005. (archives.gov)
  • The process of benchmarking helps a business to have an idea of its overall standing within the community, and make it possible to identify areas where there is room for improvement. (wisegeek.com)
  • It is important to note that benchmarking is not a process that is conducted once in a great while, then set aside for a few years. (wisegeek.com)
  • There is no single benchmarking process that has been universally adopted. (wikipedia.org)
  • In statistics, benchmarking is a method of using auxiliary information to adjust the sampling weights used in an estimation process, in order to yield more accurate estimates of totals. (wikipedia.org)
  • equivalent
  • For instance, during the 1980s some compilers could detect a specific mathematical operation used in a well-known floating-point benchmark and replace the operation with a faster mathematically equivalent operation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Credit Benchmark collects various risk metrics, including probability of default (PD) and loss given default (LGD) from contributing Internal Ratings-Based Approach (IRB) and equivalent CCAR banks. (wikipedia.org)
  • include
  • Government agencies that place and maintain records of benchmarks include: Canada Natural Resources Canada (Geodetic Survey Division) France Institut Géographique National (IGN on Wiki FR). (wikipedia.org)
  • tasks
  • Because we cannot control which workers execute the tasks, some of them may be benchmarked more than once. (mathworks.com)
  • Nevertheless, CPUs with many execution units often complete real-world and benchmark tasks in less time than the supposedly faster high-clock-rate CPU. (wikipedia.org)
  • measure
  • Benchmarks are particularly important in CPU design, giving processor architects the ability to measure and make tradeoffs in microarchitectural decisions. (wikipedia.org)
  • areas
  • The benchmark will help highlight areas that companies should focus on in order to improve their ranking, and will create greater leverage for policy-makers, communities and consumers. (huffingtonpost.co.uk)
  • The aim of a Retail Benchmarking is to highlight areas of excellence and short fallings in customer services and to give retailers the data needed to improve across the board. (wikipedia.org)
  • companies
  • I believe that the Corporate Human Rights Benchmark - unpinned by the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights - will play a major role in bringing about a world where more companies play their full part in social and economic development. (huffingtonpost.co.uk)
  • Those standards remain the norm until a competitor exhibits qualities that exceed the standard, and thus raise the benchmark for all other companies within the industry. (wisegeek.com)
  • The end result is that the overall benchmark for telecommunications within the United States began to change, as companies vied for the honor of setting the new industry standard. (wisegeek.com)
  • In a time when technology is constantly changing the way consumers make decisions on what to buy and who to buy it from, benchmarking has taken on even more importance for companies that want to be in business for many years to come. (wisegeek.com)
  • This journal helps companies decide if benchmarking is right for them and shows them how to go about it successfully. (wikipedia.org)
  • BIJ is designed as both a study of techniques and a practical manual, so that companies acquire important background knowledge as well as the information they need to instigate their own benchmarking programme. (wikipedia.org)
  • data
  • Why does TH BOTHER to run the veritable plethora of benchmarks and only publish the part of the data? (tomshardware.com)
  • Cost benchmarking is a growing factor in Cost Analysis, where there is a systematic breakdown of existing cost data to allow for closer examination. (wikipedia.org)
  • Benchmark hunters also frequently carry a compass (to follow directions gleaned from the data sheet), a probe (like a long-bladed screwdriver) to search for buried marks, a trowel (or a small shovel) to uncover buried marks, a whisk broom (to clear away debris), and one or more tape measures of various lengths, used in taping out referenced distances found on the data sheets. (wikipedia.org)
  • One important function of a population census is to provide data that can be used for benchmarking smaller surveys. (wikipedia.org)
  • Interpretation of benchmarking data is also extraordinarily difficult. (wikipedia.org)
  • Credit Benchmark is a privately owned financial data analytics company offering access to an entirely new source of information: the consensus credit risk views of the world's leading banks. (wikipedia.org)
  • system's
  • HardInfo can gather information about your system's hardware and operating system, perform benchmarks, and generate printable reports either in HTML or in plain text formats. (archlinux.org)
  • activity
  • For the purposes of a recent article, research was undertaken in realtion to benchmarking activity by states and corporations in order to comply with human rights norms within the UN system. (warwick.ac.uk)
  • known
  • They also have been known to mis-represent the significance of benchmarks, again to show their products in the best possible light. (wikipedia.org)
  • A fundamental benchmark is a point with a precisely known relationship to the level datum of the area, typically mean sea level. (wikipedia.org)
  • The algorithm of what is known as the TATP Benchmark was originally published in a Master's Thesis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Survey
  • The 2012 Benchmarking Survey is now closed. (midwife.org)
  • In the U.S., about 740,000 "benchmarks" with the most precise elevations or coordinates (but only a small fraction of the existing survey marks) are listed in a database maintained by the National Geodetic Survey (NGS) and accessible on-line. (wikipedia.org)
  • Benchmarks are typically placed ("monumented") by a government agency or private survey firm, and many governments maintain a register of these marks so that the records are available to all. (wikipedia.org)
  • formerly U.S. Coast & Geodetic Survey) The United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) The United States Forest Service The United States Geological Survey (USGS) C&GS benchmark disk in the United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • term
  • The term bench mark, or benchmark, originates from the chiseled horizontal marks that surveyors made in stone structures, into which an angle-iron could be placed to form a "bench" for a leveling rod, thus ensuring that a leveling rod could be accurately repositioned in the same place in the future. (wikipedia.org)
  • The term 'benchmark' is also mostly utilized for the purposes of elaborately designed benchmarking programs themselves. (wikipedia.org)
  • themselves
  • Banks that want to be top performers should benchmark themselves against other top players. (bcg.com)
  • Benchmarks themselves are those standards of excellence for productivity, quality, service delivery, and cost that are recognized as being the ideal within that particular field. (wisegeek.com)
  • determine
  • In March of 2005, we began informal contact with the benchmarking sites to determine their interest in participating and which of their staff members we should interview. (archives.gov)
  • We execute the benchmark on our workers to determine the relative speeds of the machines on our distributed computing network. (mathworks.com)
  • specific
  • Ideally benchmarks should only substitute for real applications if the application is unavailable, or too difficult or costly to port to a specific processor or computer system. (wikipedia.org)