• supernatural
  • Within the Satsana Phi belief system, supernatural Deities (ຜີ, ผี, [pʰiː]) or gods can sometimes be the tutelary gods of buildings or territories, of natural places, or of things. (wikipedia.org)
  • generally
  • Juxtaposed to these negative images is generally a positive and sometimes utopic orientation towards that which is considered the opposite to the other, either religion or science. (metanexus.net)
  • More generally, he is interested in the ways in which challenges and opportunities for the field of the history of medicine are unfolding in the context of recent developments in global history. (wikipedia.org)
  • people often use the words "alternative" and "complementary" interchangeably, but the two terms refer to different concepts: 'Complementary' generally refers to using a non-mainstream approach together with conventional medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1975
  • Over the last decade the histories of religion and of medicine in the early modern period have developed a more conceptually robust demeanour embracing the achievements and examples of works like Keith Thomas' Religion and the Decline of Magic (1971) and Charles Webster's The Great Instauration (1975). (history.ac.uk)
  • After Mozambique obtained independence in 1975, attempts to control traditional medicine went as far as sending diviner-healers to re-education camps. (wikipedia.org)
  • profoundly
  • Religion eventually achieves the profoundly simple realization of an all-powerful love, the love which sweeps irresistibly through the human soul when awakened to the conception of the limitless affection of the Universal Father for the sons of the universe. (ulc.net)
  • Cultural beliefs/norms profoundly affect attitudes toward cancer, participation in screening, and compliance with treatment [ 8 ]. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • importance
  • First, factors that are related to ethnicity itself (namely religion, upbringing and migration, and language) affected parents' perceived importance of immunisations, whether immunisations were permitted or culturally acceptable and their understanding of immunisation/the immunisation schedule. (bmj.com)
  • With a similar intent the collection of essays edited by M.A. Goldie, and others, invoked the phrase 'the politics of religion' to identify the importance of the ecclesiological nexus between Church and State. (history.ac.uk)
  • somewhat
  • Although focus on religion has been somewhat relaxed since the transition, 94% of Xaverian students in 2008 were baptised Roman Catholics. (wikipedia.org)
  • ultimately
  • If the anthropological tradition was interested in exploring (very crudely) the meaning that religion had for early modern society, those who emphasized the political dimensions of religion ultimately stressed the connections between religion and power. (history.ac.uk)
  • In this episode, her faith in her father ultimately proves stronger than her belief in the paranormal as she refuses to be tempted by Boggs. (wikipedia.org)
  • popular
  • Whether exploring and interpreting the impact of diverse Protestant theologies and beliefs upon the universities, the parishes, or the popular mentalité, historians of religion have become comfortable with exploring the nature, meaning and function of 'religion' in early modern historiography. (history.ac.uk)
  • Another strategy has concentrated upon 'popular' religion, the beliefs and activities of the common people performed in the parish or the environment of the family. (history.ac.uk)
  • One of a variety of compounds extending from the coinage of the term folklore in 1846 (previously popular antiquities), the term folk-belief is first evidenced in use by British folklorist Laurence Gomme in 1892. (wikipedia.org)
  • system
  • A spellbinding journey between two worlds, this remarkable book describes surgeon Lori Arviso Alvord's struggles to bring modern medicine to the Navajo reservation in Gallup, New Mexico-and to bring the values of her people to a medical care system in danger of losing its heart. (barnesandnoble.com)
  • Religion then was as much a system of administration, a tool of state formation or legitimation, as a generator of meaning and cultural order. (history.ac.uk)
  • How does your belief system include or exclude the medicine man, shaman, or priest? (ulc.net)
  • Does the God of your belief system need to be coaxed into loving and helping you and/or others? (ulc.net)
  • However, the highly sophisticated technology involved in modern medicine, which is beginning to integrate into Africa's health care system, could possibly destroy Africa's deep-seated cultural values. (wikipedia.org)
  • attempts
  • In all of our philosophical attempts to rigorously define either science or religion, the abstract terms which we use daily with a common sense understanding begin to elude comprehension. (metanexus.net)
  • During this time, attempts were also made to control the sale of herbal medicines. (wikipedia.org)
  • Souls
  • On the belief that humans have souls and that animals do not, MacDougall later measured the changes in weight from fifteen dogs after death. (wikipedia.org)
  • strongly
  • Folk belief and associated behaviors are strongly evidenced among all elements of society, regardless of education level or income. (wikipedia.org)
  • found
  • There's an argument that this is why religions endure for thousands of years and are found, in one form or another, in every culture - it provides a deep-rooted sense of satisfaction on a neurological level. (dailymail.co.uk)
  • Research has found that access to care, knowledge of the examination procedures (clinical breast examination and mammography), and cultural health beliefs were positively associated with breast cancer screening in multivariate analyses [ 2 ]. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • In turn, folk belief is found in an agricultural, suburban, and urban environments alike. (wikipedia.org)
  • medical
  • Ben Moody collaborates with medical professionals and also offers information about regenerative medicine, stem cell therapies, gene therapy, and hormone replacements therapies. (prweb.com)
  • MacDougall's results were published in April of the same year in the Journal of the American Society for Psychical Research, and the medical journal American Medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • ISBN 978-0-8014-1850-1 (cloth) 2006 "What Stays Constant at the Heart of Medicine," Editorial, British Medical Journal (BMJ) 333 (23 December 2006): pp. 1281-1282. (wikipedia.org)
  • study
  • New program will study the role of religion in practicing medicine. (ebscohost.com)
  • More recently, developing from the writings of two Cambridge historians in the 1980s, the study of religion has become more political. (history.ac.uk)
  • So, I was fascinated - if not surprised - to read about a study this week which revealed how religion has a profound effect on the brain. (dailymail.co.uk)
  • In one study, patients with schizophrenia who were encouraged to engage in religion were less likely to be hospitalised than those who were not. (dailymail.co.uk)
  • modern
  • The second story is about how I have come to understand, after years of reflection, that my tribe has knowledge about medicine and healing, ways of thinking about health and illness that provide solutions to some of modern medicine's most daunting problems. (barnesandnoble.com)
  • Early Modern Medicine," in Encarta Encyclopedia (World English edition). (wikipedia.org)
  • nature
  • One exciting aspect of the science and religion dialogue is to see how science seems to point beyond itself to something more, something transcendent, although it would be a big leap to necessarily equate this "more" with the God of Abraham, Isaac Jacob, Jesus, and Mohammed or the Buddha nature in all things. (metanexus.net)
  • While little is known about cancer control strategies among AI/ANs, we do know that in some AI/AN languages the literal translation for cancer is "the sore that never heals [ 9 ]," leading to the erroneous belief that cancer is by its nature incurable, and screening only reveals inevitable death. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • In other cases, controversy over mainstream medicine causes questions about the nature of a treatment, such as water fluoridation. (wikipedia.org)
  • While undoubtedly a useful scientific tool of analysis, the RCT, in its reductionist nature, can present difficulties in assessing those medicines falling outside of the biomedical framework. (wikipedia.org)
  • years
  • As the profession developed, a novice was required to serve an apprenticeship of ten years of hardship and self-denial to qualify as a medicine man. (ulc.net)
  • history
  • Throughout the history, they are often noted for having one of the oldest presence in the world, and also applauded for its tolerance with other religions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Harold John Cook (born 1952), Honorary FRCP, served as Director of the Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at University College, London (UCL) from 2000 to 2009, and was the Queen Wilhelmina Visiting Professor of History at Columbia University in New York during the 2007-2008 academic year. (wikipedia.org)
  • The book documents the developments in medicine and natural history were fundamental aspects of this new science. (wikipedia.org)
  • approach
  • That is to say that on top of the rather diluted anthropological approach to the function of religion within parish communities derived from the exemplar of Thomas' work, a sort of political sociology has been grafted. (history.ac.uk)
  • Alternative' refers to using a non-mainstream approach in place of conventional medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Effect
  • Many conference participants leveled strong criticism at the activities of the Templeton Foundation, charging that it attempted to blur the line between science and religion, and that it funded "garbage research" aimed at showing a healing effect of prayer. (wikipedia.org)
  • One of the most critical is the placebo effect - a well-established observation in medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • help
  • Can evolutionary biology, anthropology and neuroscience help us to better understand how we construct beliefs, and experience empathy, fear and awe? (thesciencenetwork.org)