• nutritional
  • The review article by Nguyen and Thomas highlights the potential importance of nutritional factors that could influence the expression of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. (child-encyclopedia.com)
  • This handbook is a practical reference manual, containing information on day-to-day management as well as background information on specific scenarios and conditions, for practitioners who regularly see children with common and rarer paediatric gastroenterology, hepatology and nutritional problems. (oup.com)
  • A second emphasis in his research work was the correlation between nutritional disturbance and the behaviour of the child. (wikipedia.org)
  • It has been suggested that this variety effect may be evolutionarily adaptive, as complete nutrition cannot be found in a single food, and increased dietary variety increases the likelihood of meeting nutritional requirements for various vitamins and minerals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Proponents of this idea say that in poor nutritional conditions, a pregnant woman can modify the development of her unborn child such that it will be prepared for survival in an environment in which resources are likely to be short, resulting in a thrifty phenotype (Hales & Barker, 1992). (wikipedia.org)
  • ADHD
  • Before joining BGU, Dr. Efstratopoulou was a researcher at the Research Unit for Psychomotor Therapy for children at the Catholic University of Leuven, Belgium, working with children with autism, ADHD, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorders and children with other motor, emotional, behavioral and developmental difficulties. (bishopg.ac.uk)
  • Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) - characterised by serious hyperactivity, impulsivity and/or difficulties with attention and concentration - now affects at least one in every 20 children in the UK. (jfhc.co.uk)
  • It can often be overwhelming when making decisions on what to feed your child with ADHD while overcoming fussy eating habits and behavioural issues. (igennus.com)
  • Among those who are seen in specialty clinics, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) are present at higher rates. (wikipedia.org)
  • Adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (also referred to as adult ADHD, adult with ADHD, or simply ADHD in adults, formerly AADD) is the neurobiological condition of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adults. (wikipedia.org)
  • Diagnosis of the condition follows after one or several assessment interviews by a clinician including: examination of personal history observational evidence from family members or close friends academic reports, often going back to school years etc., as well as evaluation to diagnose additional possible conditions which often coexist with ADHD, called comorbidities or comorbid disorders. (wikipedia.org)
  • The DSM-IV criteria for ADHD were, however, tailored towards the type of symptoms that children would show, and might therefore have underestimated the prevalence of ADHD in adults. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is estimated that 33-66% of children with ADHD will continue to have significant ADHD-related symptoms persisting into adulthood, resulting in a significant impact on education, employment, and interpersonal relationships. (wikipedia.org)
  • The learning potential and overall intelligence of an adult with ADHD, however, are no different from the potential and intelligence of adults who do not have the disorder. (wikipedia.org)
  • Whereas teachers and caregivers responsible for children are often attuned to the symptoms of ADHD, employers and others who interact with adults are less likely to regard such behaviors as a symptom. (wikipedia.org)
  • patterns
  • We are interested in studying eating behaviours in children with migraine since there is evidence that altered patterns of eating behaviour (and underlying changes in appetite) are seen in migraineurs although not studied systematically. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Conduct disorders are characterised by repetitive and persistent patterns of antisocial, aggressive or defiant behaviour that amounts to significant and persistent violations of age-appropriate social expectations. (nice.org.uk)
  • Eating Disorders (ED) are characterized by abnormal and disturbed eating patterns that affect the lives of the individuals who worry about their weight to the extreme. (wikipedia.org)
  • The information that enters offspring phenotype during early development mirror the mother's own developmental experience and the quality of the environment during her own maturation rather than predicting the possible future environment of the offspring Many human diseases in adulthood are related to growth patterns during early life, determining early-life nutrition as the underlying mechanism. (wikipedia.org)
  • obese
  • This course will focus on nutrition and exercise for children and how healthy lifestyle habits such as healthy eating and physical activity can lower the risk of becoming obese. (distance-learning-centre.co.uk)
  • Fowler SJ, Bulik CM. Family environment and psychiatric history in women with binge-eating disorder and obese controls. (springer.com)
  • Binge-eating disorder as a distinct familial phenotype in obese individuals. (springer.com)
  • Using the percentile ranking to determine whether or not a child or adolescent between 2-20 years old is overweight or obese inherits the same techniques as a BMI except the interpretation of the data collected is varied. (wikipedia.org)
  • Obese children are classified as being equal to or greater than the 95th percentile. (wikipedia.org)
  • Between 1985 and 1995 the number of obese children increased dramatically from both perspectives of boys (10.7% to 20.5%) and girls (11.8% to 21.1%) aged 7-15 and 5-17 in the two respective year brackets. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the 2011/12 Australian Bureau of Statistics- Australian Health Survey, statistics reiterated the lack of substantial preventative methods, highlighting a 1% increase and therefore a total of 26% of children aged between 5-17 years as being either overweight or obese. (wikipedia.org)
  • anxiety
  • The factors associated with anxiety disorder were being female (OR=2.09, 95% CI 1.64 to 2.66), being in high school (OR=1.8, 95% CI 1.38 to 2.36), physical abuse (OR=1.5, 95% CI 1.04 to 2.15), having difficulty falling asleep (OR=1.67, 95% CI 1.33 to 2.10) and low-level social support (OR=2.17, 95% CI 1.44 to 3.28) and middle-level social support (OR=1.82, 95% CI 1.3 to 2.56). (bmj.com)
  • Children living with both parents had a higher rate of anxiety than left-behind children. (bmj.com)
  • Some studies have shown contradictory results to ED individuals' heightened attention and enhanced memory, however the difference could be attributed to an anxiety-induced response and avoidance behaviour. (wikipedia.org)
  • Anorexia
  • Although amenorrhea was once a required criterion for the disorder, it is no longer required to meet criteria for anorexia nervosa due to its exclusive nature for sufferers who are male, post-menopause, or who do not menstruate for other reasons. (wikipedia.org)
  • cognitive
  • The intensity of infection with A. lumbricoides, however, was correlated with the level of verbal ability and with inhibition-control aspects of cognitive behaviour. (nih.gov)
  • health
  • The PhD in Exercise, Nutrition and Health Sciences establishes a sound research training base and provides practical experience, preparing you for different types of employment, including research, policy and intervention implementation. (bristol.ac.uk)
  • She holds a Doctoral Degree in Biomedical Sciences from the Faculty of Kinisiology and Rehabilitation Sciences, Catholic University of Leuven, Belgium, and also an European Master in Psychomotor Therapy for Children (KULeuven, Belgium) and a Master in Human Performance and Health for Special Populations (Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece). (bishopg.ac.uk)
  • However, many eating habits are set in the second year of life, so it is important to encourage young children to eat a wide range of foods,for optimal nutrition and lifelong health. (jfhc.co.uk)
  • Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Institute of Mental Health under Award Numbers K23MH087770, R01MH105506, and R01MH081218 and the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development under Award Number R01HD065282. (healthcanal.com)
  • Their effects on health were disappointing, though, and in the 1950s and 1960s, nutrition was de-emphasised in standard medical curricula. (wikipedia.org)
  • Eastman is an endocrinologist and has directed or conducted research and public health projects into elimination of iodine deficiency disorders (IDD) in Malaysia, Indonesia, Laos, Cambodia, Thailand, several Pacific Islands, Hong Kong, China and Tibet and Australia. (wikipedia.org)
  • A registered dietitian (RD) or registered dietitian nutritionist (RDN) is a dietitian who meets all of a set of special academic and professional requirements, including the completion of a bachelor's degree with an accredited nutrition curriculum, an internship at an approved health-care facility, foodservice organization, or community agency, and satisfactory performance on a registration exam. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most RDs work in the treatment and prevention of disease (administering medical nutrition therapy, as part of medical teams), often in hospitals, health-maintenance organizations, private practices, or other health-care facilities. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dietary modification to address medical issues involving dietary intake is a major part of dietetics (the study of nutrition as it relates to health). (wikipedia.org)
  • However, some improvements in health care have been made, most notably significant progress in maternal-child health. (wikipedia.org)
  • Health care facilities, hygiene, nutrition, and sanitation in Nepal are of poor quality, particularly in the rural areas. (wikipedia.org)
  • In addition to the research areas described in Phase 1, detailed parameters will be collected within the following major research areas: Cancer Cardiovascular disease Education Environmental health Infectious disease Nutrition and endocrinology Obstetrics and gynaecology Paediatric health Psychology Renal disease Respiratory health Speech and literacy For Phase 1, participants will be a community-based, randomly selected sample of 2000 eligible individuals living in the community of Joondalup. (wikipedia.org)
  • Participants who choose to take part in the JFHS will be asked to complete a questionnaire on their medical history, behaviours and lifestyle, mental health and community participation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Such disorders may be diagnosed by a mental health professional. (wikipedia.org)
  • A mental disorder is one aspect of mental health. (wikipedia.org)
  • Psychological
  • In addition to parasite load, the assessment consisted of a battery of psychological and neuropsychological tests, an EEG examination, measures of iodine level, presence of goitre and level of nutrition. (nih.gov)
  • Toddlers' diets and the impact of nutrition on physical and psychological well-being were the focus of study days organised by The Learning Curve earlier this year. (jfhc.co.uk)
  • She provided evidence-based advice, to help differentiate expected behaviours from those that could be associated with more serious psychological conditions. (jfhc.co.uk)
  • Short-term effects on children can mean a decrease in their psychological well-being (stigmatisation and poor self-esteem) as well as physical deteriorations such as sleep apnea, breathlessness and cardiovascular disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2013, the American Psychiatric Association (APA) redefined mental disorders in the DSM-5 as "a syndrome characterized by clinically significant disturbance in an individual's cognition, emotion regulation, or behavior that reflects a dysfunction in the psychological, biological, or developmental processes underlying mental functioning. (wikipedia.org)
  • findings
  • Molecular-genetic correlates of self-harming behaviors in eating-disordered women: findings from a combined Canadian-German sample. (springer.com)
  • The participants were a convenience sample from one rural county in North China, thereby limiting our ability to generalise the findings to left-behind children in other areas of the country. (bmj.com)
  • They report their findings in the article " The Neural Correlates of Emotional Lability in Children with ASD ," published in Brain Connectivity , a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers . (healthcanal.com)
  • psychiatric
  • A mental disorder, also called a mental illness or psychiatric disorder, is a behavioral or mental pattern that causes significant distress or impairment of personal functioning. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are currently two widely established systems that classify mental disorders: ICD-10 Chapter V: Mental and behavioural disorders, since 1949 part of the International Classification of Diseases produced by the WHO, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) produced by the American Psychiatric Association (APA) since 1952. (wikipedia.org)
  • characteristic
  • It is characteristic for the generation of the so-called war children of the Second World War that until the beginning of the 1990s they did not receive any attention either in scientific research or in public consciousness. (wikipedia.org)
  • dyslexia
  • At least one in every 10 children has either specific difficulties with literacy skills (dyslexia), or with motor coordination, organisation and planning (dyspraxia), or both - limiting their educational, social and future employment opportunities. (jfhc.co.uk)
  • Binge
  • Familiality and heritability of binge eating disorder: results of a case-control family study and a twin study. (springer.com)
  • Mitchell K, Neale M, Bulik C, Aggen S, Kendler K, Mazzeo S. Binge eating disorder: a symptom-level investigation of genetic and environmental influences on liability. (springer.com)
  • spectrum
  • Some intervention and prevention strategies can reduce the incidence of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD). (child-encyclopedia.com)
  • Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders are preventable, but continue to be manifest nearly four decades after the first article on fetal alcohol syndrome was published in the US. (child-encyclopedia.com)
  • Rigorous research on the prevention of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders is relatively sparse and appears to be concentrated on targeted screening and brief intervention efforts. (child-encyclopedia.com)
  • Tourette's is defined as part of a spectrum of tic disorders, which includes provisional, transient and persistent (chronic) tics. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although Tourette's is the more severe expression of the spectrum of tic disorders, most cases are mild. (wikipedia.org)
  • Food
  • This is why fast-food restaurants are popular with children: they provide "dry" foods that are uniform in shape, neutral in colour, and often served in exactly the same way. (jfhc.co.uk)
  • Food choice is the subject of research in nutrition, food science, psychology, anthropology, sociology, and other branches of the natural and social sciences. (wikipedia.org)
  • Roughly half of all RDNs hold graduate degrees and many have certifications in specialized fields such as sports, pediatrics, renal, oncological, food-allergy, or gerontological nutrition. (wikipedia.org)
  • A growing number of dietitians work in the food industry, journalism, sports nutrition, corporate wellness programs, and other non-traditional dietetics settings. (wikipedia.org)
  • Schema-related: display maladaptive perceptions of food, shape, weight and self that lead to obsessive attention on and enhanced memory for these items, leading to maintaining the eating disorder thought and eating behaviour. (wikipedia.org)
  • Only 24 percent of children consume iron-rich food, 24 percent of children meet a minimally acceptable diet, and only half of pregnant women take recommended iron supplementation during pregnancy. (wikipedia.org)
  • There is positive association between household food consumption score and lower prevalence of stunting, underweight and wasting.Children in the food secure household have lowest rates of stunting (33 percent), while children in the food in secure household have rates up to 49 percentage. (wikipedia.org)
  • is an autoimmune disorder in which the body is unable to digest gluten which is found in various food grains, most notably wheat, and also rye and barley. (wikipedia.org)
  • Exercise
  • The Diet, Nutrition & Exercise for Children - Level 3 Course is designed to equip students with the theoretical knowledge, information and resources needed to educate parents and children up to 12 years old on how to lead healthier lifestyles. (distance-learning-centre.co.uk)
  • On successful completion of this course students will receive a Diet Nutrition & Exercise for Children Certificate of Achievement by ABC Awards and a Learner Unit Summary (which lists the details of all the units you have completed as part of your course). (distance-learning-centre.co.uk)
  • unreliable medical source] Medium-to-high intensity physical exercise, improved sleep and improved and targeted nutrition[unreliable medical source] are also known to have a positive effect. (wikipedia.org)
  • chronic
  • Chronic tic disorder was either single or multiple, motor or phonic tics (but not both), which were present for more than a year. (wikipedia.org)
  • psychology
  • Evolutionary developmental psychology Evolutionary physiology Phenotypic plasticity Trivers-Willard hypothesis Thrifty gene hypothesis Prenatal nutrition and birth weight Hales CN, Barker DJ (July 1992). (wikipedia.org)
  • sparse
  • This idea (Barker, 1992) is now widely (if not universally) accepted and is a source of concern for societies undergoing a transition from sparse to better nutrition (Robinson, 2001). (wikipedia.org)
  • medical
  • Coauthors Randi Bennett and Amy Roy , Fordham University, Bronx, NY and Krishna Somandepalli and Adriana Di Martino , NYU Child Study Center of the Langone Medical Center, New York, NY, used resting-state fMRI to study the variability in emotional lability between a group of children 5-12 years of age. (healthcanal.com)
  • A dietitian alters their patient's nutrition based upon their medical condition and individual needs. (wikipedia.org)
  • clinical
  • She has many years of experience working with children in both educational and clinical settings and she is experienced also in the education of teachers and Special Education professionals. (bishopg.ac.uk)
  • Five children showed clinical improvement in standard scores: two after HSS and three after placebo. (bmj.com)
  • prevention
  • summarizes the current status of prevention efforts, setting them in the context of the epidemiology of alcohol use by women of child-bearing age in the US. (child-encyclopedia.com)
  • 1 October 2013 Recommendation from antisocial personality disorder: prevention and management (NICE guideline CG77) added to parent and foster carer or guardian training programmes . (nice.org.uk)
  • common
  • A contributing factor to deteriorating nutrition is high diarrheal disease morbidity, exacerbated by the lack of access to proper sanitation and the common practice of open defecation (44 percent) in Nepal. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2016
  • Report from DHS 2016, has shown that in Nepal, 36% of children are stunted (below -2 standard deviation), 12% are severely stunted (below -3 standard deviation), 27% of all children under 5 are underweight, and 5% are severely underweight. (wikipedia.org)
  • placebo
  • The county council said it was doing a "trial" of fish oil pills in children, but the trial was designed so that it couldn't possibly give useful information - not least because it had no placebo group - and was very likely to give a false positive result. (badscience.net)
  • A single dose of intravenous human secretin is not effective in changing behaviour and communication in children with ASD when compared to placebo. (bmj.com)
  • commonly
  • Politicians and social commentators may widely disagree on the "causal factors", but poverty, social deprivation, poor parenting, lack of family or community support are phrases that commonly crop up to "explain" such behaviours. (jfhc.co.uk)