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  • particle
  • Understanding microviscosity requires an understanding of viscosity and diffusion i.e. macroscopic viscosity and bulk diffusion and where their assumptions break down at the micro to nanometer scale where physicists are still trying to replace phenomenological laws with physical laws governing the behavior of single particle mobility. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the field of biophysics, a typical microviscosity problem is understanding how a biomolecule's mobility is hindered within a cellular compartment which will depend upon many factors such as the size, shape, charge, quantity and density of both the diffusing particle and all members of its environment. (wikipedia.org)
  • magnetic
  • As a physicist specializing in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), I am developing a non-invasive, empirical method to diagnose Alzheimer's Disease and other central nervous systems disorders in their earliest stages. (uwinnipeg.ca)
  • measurements
  • He had details wrong but the basic concept right: a suite of equations that, when applied to measurements of heat, cloudiness, humidity and the like, could project how those factors would change over time. (nytimes.com)
  • thus
  • I think that's the scenario that many managers are pursuing, because those more powerful factors might be controllable and thus the outcome is more predictable. (artima.com)
  • equation
  • Lewin's equation, B = f(P, E), is a heuristic formula proposed by psychologist Kurt Lewin as an explanation of what determines behavior. (wikipedia.org)
  • In Lewin's book, he first presents the equation as B = f(S), where behavior is a function of the whole situation (S). He then extended this original equation by suggesting that the whole situation could be roughly split into two parts: the person (P) and the environment (E). According to Lewin, social behavior, in particular, was the most psychologically interesting and relevant behavior. (wikipedia.org)
  • In Lewin's original proposal of his equation, he did not specify how exactly the person and the environment interact to produce behavior. (wikipedia.org)
  • The factor 2π makes Q expressible in simpler terms, involving only the coefficients of the second-order differential equation describing most resonant systems, electrical or mechanical. (wikipedia.org)
  • find
  • Understanding that behavior could help physicists find new materials that superconduct at even higher temperatures. (phys.org)
  • i still like trying to find factors and completing the square just by looking, but i can see how some kids dont. (physicsforums.com)
  • Informally, it solves the following problem: given an integer N, find its prime factors. (wikipedia.org)
  • The problem we are trying to solve is, given an odd composite number N {\displaystyle N} , find an integer d {\displaystyle d} , strictly between 1 {\displaystyle 1} and N {\displaystyle N} , that divides N {\displaystyle N} . We are interested in odd values of N {\displaystyle N} because any even value of N {\displaystyle N} trivially has the number 2 {\displaystyle 2} as a prime factor. (wikipedia.org)
  • Physics
  • Physics always involves approximations, and discovering which factors, in that particular situation, are important. (artima.com)
  • The problem is that science in general and physics in particular is all about looking at the situation and understanding what the dominant factors are, and discarding the factors that, in the current situation, do not influence the outcome enough to care about it for whatever we are doing at the moment (the factors are still there -- they may simply not be measurable, or we may not care about their impact). (artima.com)
  • This is the first time anyone has shown two motor behaviors by cilia in a single cell, says James Valles, chair of the Department of Physics at Brown and one of the paper's senior authors. (eurekalert.org)
  • In physics and engineering the quality factor or Q factor is a dimensionless parameter that describes how underdamped an oscillator or resonator is, and characterizes a resonator's bandwidth relative to its centre frequency. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1984 William D. Coolidge Award from the American Association of Physicists in Medicine This award recognizes an AAPM member for an eminent career in medical physics. (wikipedia.org)
  • single
  • In their model, they can study behavior at high and low energy (determined by how the excitation energy of a single electron compares to the average energy of an electron in the system), and it turns out that at low energy, the black-hole model exhibits many of the same unusual traits seen in non-Fermi liquids such as cuprates. (phys.org)
  • physical
  • The research, published in the Aug. 5 online edition of Science , is one of the first to show that gauge/gravity duality can shed light on a material's puzzling physical behavior. (phys.org)
  • object
  • The core idea is that, when understanding, explaining, and/or predicting the behavior of an object, we can choose to view it at varying levels of abstraction. (wikipedia.org)
  • several
  • The aim of this workshop is to bring together physicists from the several areas where effective field theories are employed with a small number of philosophers who have been investigating methodological issues related to making sense of the concept of emergence. (perimeterinstitute.ca)
  • model
  • Therefore, once the physicists calculated the features of the model, using general relativity, those values could be translated to the corresponding values in the strange-metal system. (phys.org)
  • The problem occurs when we start ignoring those factors altogether, and pretending that they don't exist and that our model applies everywhere. (artima.com)
  • And it's impossible to model their behavior. (artima.com)
  • study
  • With a bit more study, Valles hopes this finding could shed light on the molecular mechanisms responsible for these two motor behaviors. (eurekalert.org)
  • view
  • The intentional stance is a term coined by philosopher Daniel Dennett for the level of abstraction in which we view the behavior of an entity in terms of mental properties. (wikipedia.org)
  • changes
  • In the earth sciences, he has published on topics as varied as the recovery from the KT-boundary mass extinction event and the factors driving long-term changes in the volume of the Great Salt Lake. (realclimate.org)
  • knowledge
  • Science was therefore distinguished as the knowledge of nature and things which are true for every community, and the name of the specialized pursuit of such knowledge was philosophy - the realm of the first philosopher-physicists. (wikipedia.org)
  • Knowledge of their behavior in the wild is limited, but they are thought to be highly arboreal, rarely descending from the canopy. (wikipedia.org)
  • higher
  • i think it applies more readily when the numerator is of signifigantly higher order and a simple factor is hard to remove visually. (physicsforums.com)
  • The quality factor of atomic clocks, superconducting RF cavities used in accelerators, and some high-Q lasers can reach as high as 1011 and higher. (wikipedia.org)
  • system
  • While Lewis doesn't want them to challenge the behavior through the student disciplinary system, he said that faculty members can promote civility. (insidehighered.com)
  • To harness the predictive power of the SME in any specific system, a calculation has to be performed so that all these factors can be accounted for. (wikipedia.org)
  • high
  • In 1986, physicists discovered that cuprates (ceramic compounds that contain copper) can superconduct at relatively high temperatures (up to 135 degrees Celsius above absolute zero). (phys.org)
  • Resonators with high quality factors have low damping, so that they ring or vibrate longer. (wikipedia.org)
  • Clocks, lasers, and other resonating systems that need either strong resonance or high frequency stability have high quality factors. (wikipedia.org)
  • problem
  • Shor's algorithm consists of two parts: A reduction, which can be done on a classical computer, of the factoring problem to the problem of order-finding. (wikipedia.org)
  • space
  • Field theory is centered around the idea that a person's life space determines their behavior. (wikipedia.org)
  • For experiments conducted in space, the orbital motion of the craft is an important factor in determining the signals of Lorentz violation that might arise. (wikipedia.org)
  • terms
  • The term was not intended as an abbreviation for "quality" or "quality factor", although these terms have grown to be associated with it. (wikipedia.org)
  • usually
  • In contrast, a condition that is completely genetic in origin would theoretically yield a concordance of 100% for MZ pairs and usually much less for DZ pairs depending on factors such as the number of genes involved and assortative mating. (wikipedia.org)
  • predict
  • The calculation of glass properties (glass modeling) is used to predict glass properties of interest or glass behavior under certain conditions (e.g., during production) without experimental investigation, based on past data and experience, with the intention to save time, material, financial, and environmental resources, or to gain scientific insight. (wikipedia.org)
  • Atoms are small enough that attempting to predict their behavior using classical physics - as if they were billiard balls, for example - gives noticeably incorrect predictions due to quantum effects. (wikipedia.org)
  • Through the development of physics, atomic models have incorporated quantum principles to better explain and predict the behavior. (wikipedia.org)
  • long
  • This color mixing behavior had long been known to printers, dyers and painters, but these trades preferred pure pigments to primary color mixtures, because the mixtures were too dull (unsaturated). (wikipedia.org)
  • It has been shown, however, that using a longer chain instead (e.g. a chain that is n times as long as the initially considered chain using a thinning factor of n) leads to better estimates of the true posterior. (wikipedia.org)
  • important
  • citation needed] The most important problem has been a confusion between the behavior of light mixtures, called additive color, and the behavior of paint, ink, dye, or pigment mixtures, called subtractive color. (wikipedia.org)