• malaria
  • Typhoid, malaria, hepatitis or elevated temperature and bile emesis /fever due to a liver disorder, See typhus. (google.com)
  • Many sub- Sahara n African people were resistant to the disease, but European colonists had a very tough time establishing a foothold in tropical areas-the terrifying prospect of malaria also kept the wetlands of Europe and the Americas sparsely populated until the introduction of quinine. (everything2.com)
  • Therefore, one has to be careful enough to consider malaria as a diagnostic possibility in several disease conditions. (malariasite.com)
  • 23-Although the presence of acute headache with fever is quite characteristic of malaria, particularly in the returning traveler, this alone it is not enough to make a firm diagnosis. (malariasite.com)
  • Over the last 17 years she has been based full-time at the East Africa, where she leads a research group whose major research portfolio includes severe malaria, bacterial sepsis and severe malnutrition in children and clinical trials in emergency care. (kemri-wellcome.org)
  • His leading research is in mainly in the areas of malaria and Blackwater Fever with a focus on epidemiology, pathophysiology and treatment. (kemri-wellcome.org)
  • typhoid
  • Whipple's father passed away from pneumonia or typhoid fever when he was just shy two years old. (wikipedia.org)
  • aka Camp diarrhea, typhoid fever. (google.com)
  • Outbreaks such as the 1898 typhoid fever epidemic-which decimated the army, accounting for 15 percent of casualties and resulting in over 2,000 deaths during the Spanish American War-and 1917-1918 influenza that killed over 30,000 soldiers during World War I, were becoming less common with proper sanitation and isolation. (aapc.com)
  • In 1942, the U.S. military vaccinated all active duty personnel against tetanus, typhoid, smallpox, cholera, and yellow fever, curbing or eliminating these diseases during WWII. (aapc.com)
  • malarial
  • Malarial or intermittent fever characterized by paroxysms (stages of chills, fever, and sweating at regularly recurring times) and followed by an interval or intermission whose length determines the epithets: quotidian, tertian, quartan, and quintan ague (defined in the text). (google.com)
  • Malnutrition, HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, neoplastic diseases, transplants and immunosuppression and end stage organ disease can also influence the course of malarial illness. (malariasite.com)
  • symptoms
  • The symptoms of this fever, it is to be regretted, are so various and irregular, in different cases and under different circumstances, that a mere nosological definition of them would afford no precise information and might mislead those it was intended to instruct. (malariasite.com)
  • swamp fever
  • Popularly, the disease was known as "fever and ague," "chill fever," "the shakes," and by names expressive of the locality in which it was prevalent--such as, "swamp fever" (in Louisiana), "Panama fever," and "Chagres fever. (google.com)
  • For most of human history, those who inhabited wet areas in warm climates lived in terror of a frightful illness which the classical Romans called 'Swamp Fever. (everything2.com)
  • Infectious
  • we have channeled part of his essence: This post mostly concerns itself with infectious diseases, thanks to several recent posts on SBM that discussed the plausibility of health claims† and that touched on the recent discovery that most peptic ulcer disease (PUD) is caused by a bacterium, Helicobacter pylori. (sciencebasedmedicine.org)
  • An infectious fever may also rise and fall throughout the day, reaching its peek in the late afternoon or early evening. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Professor of Paediatric Tropical Infectious Diseases at the Faculty of Medicine and Director of the ICCARE Centre at the Global Centre of Health Innovation, Imperial College, London and an Honorary Fellow at MRC Clinical Trials Unit, University College, London. (kemri-wellcome.org)
  • Despite
  • Despite common beliefs, fever is not harmful except in patients who cannot tolerate its hypermetabolic effects, some older patients in whom it can cause delirium, and children with a history of febrile seizures. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Despite medical advances, for every two men lost to battle in the Southwest Pacific theatre (Australia, New Guinea, Solomon Islands, Dutch East Indies, Borneo, and the Philippines), five men were lost to disease. (aapc.com)
  • illness
  • Under the mentorship of William Welch, Eugene Opie, and William McCallum, Whipple was inspired to correlate clinical illness and disease, to the tissue findings discovered on autopsy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Diagnosing the cause of a fever may lead to specific therapies that limit the duration of an illness, prevent secondary organ damage or even death. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • clinical
  • on the other, relying on only fever for a clinical diagnosis and treatment can lead to over-diagnosis and increased cost burden. (malariasite.com)
  • lasts
  • How long a fever lasts and how high it may go depends on several factors, including its cause, the age of the patient, and his or her overall health. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • lice
  • Together with Arthur Bacot and F. Martin Duncan he demonstrated the association of the trench fever virus with Rickettsia quintana in lice. (wikipedia.org)
  • Yellow
  • American plague - Yellow fever. (google.com)
  • Black vomit - Vomiting old (black) blood due to ulcers or yellow fever. (google.com)
  • Like the yellow fever mosquito, it belongs to the subgenus Stegomyia (Gr. στέγος, "covered, roofed", referring to the scales that completely cover the dorsal surface in this subgenus, and μυία, "fly") within the Aedes genus. (wikipedia.org)
  • Patients
  • However in patients with arterial blood not saturated with oxygen, for example with lung or heart disease, stimulation of breathing or administration of oxygen should increase the oxygen carriage in the blood and be beneficial or life-saving. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Patients with fever frequently seek professional medical attention. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Many patients present with a not-so-typical fever and some with no fever at all. (malariasite.com)
  • Vomiting
  • Nausea and vomiting can occur during the febrile paroxysm or as a predominant symptom with only low grade fever. (malariasite.com)
  • This can begin suddenly in association with headache, vomiting and mild or no fever. (malariasite.com)
  • tumor
  • Fever is caused by the release of interleukin-1 (IL-1), interleukin-2 (IL-2), and tumor necrosis factor from white blood cells (esp. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • certain
  • Anyone who chanced to survive was almost certain to be cursed with recurring bouts of the disease for the rest of their lives. (everything2.com)
  • Malignant hyperthermia is a rare, inherited condition in which a person develops a very high fever when given certain anesthetics or muscle relaxants in preparation for surgery. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • common
  • yet some researchers have speculated about adverse effects of this common practice (e.g., whether there is a link suppression of fever and autistic disorders). (thefreedictionary.com)
  • high
  • Her enterprising personal physician , Dr. Juan de Vega had heard tales of an amazing ' fever tree' growing high in the mountain s. (everything2.com)
  • medical
  • He obtained his medical degree at Westminster Medical School in the University of London in 1985 and subsequently trained in Paediatrics and Tropical Medicine at a range of London hospitals including Westminster Children's Hospital, University College, the Hospital for Tropical Diseases and Imperial College. (kemri-wellcome.org)