• Pneumonia
  • The bacterium, which can be demonstrated in at least 75 per cent of the cases of lobar pneumonia, which is now almost uni- versally accepted as the cause of the disease, and about whose specificity very few doubts can be raised, is the pneumococcus of Prankel and Weichselbaum. (archive.org)
  • Finally, some of these bacteria can cause a specific type of pneumonia referred to as atypical pneumonia. (wikipedia.org)
  • That is not to say that atypical pneumonia is strictly caused by atypical bacteria, for this disease can also have a fungal, protozoan or viral cause. (wikipedia.org)
  • The bacteria can also cause pneumonia, other respiratory illnesses and urinary tract infections. (wikipedia.org)
  • sewage treatment
  • In industry, bacteria are important in sewage treatment and the breakdown of oil spills, the production of cheese and yogurt through fermentation, and the recovery of gold, palladium, copper and other metals in the mining sector, as well as in biotechnology, and the manufacture of antibiotics and other chemicals. (wikipedia.org)
  • coli
  • A single E. coli bacteria reproducing without any competition every 20 minutes would create a population in four days that outnumbers the (of course an estimated figure) number of quarks in the Universe. (everything2.com)
  • A prime example of this is when the residential bacterium E. coli of the GI tract enters the urinary tract. (wikipedia.org)
  • Vibrio
  • Cholera is a waterborne infection caused by the bacterium Vibrio chloerae, and is transmitted via food or water that is contaminated with fecal matter. (wikipedia.org)
  • These bacteria may be free living (such as Vibrio harveyi) or in symbiosis with animals such as the Hawaiian Bobtail squid (Aliivibrio fischeri) or terrestrial nematodes (Photorhabdus luminescens). (wikipedia.org)
  • Salmonella
  • Exogenous bacteria can also enter an enclosed ecosystem via ingestion of contaminated food.Food-borne diseases such as Salmonella poisoning are transmitted by food not properly cooked or by individuals infected with the pathogen. (wikipedia.org)
  • resides
  • The amount of local disturbance, in proportion to the constitutional disturbance, is, in the majority of cases, slight, and almost always partakes of a necrotic charac- ter, which suggests that in typhoid we have to do with a toxic bacterium whose disease-producing capacity resides in the elaboration of a toxic substance. (archive.org)
  • opportunistic
  • While cancer-associated bacteria have long been considered to be opportunistic (i.e., infecting healthy tissues after cancer has already established itself), there is some evidence that bacteria may be directly carcinogenic. (wikipedia.org)
  • genus
  • The first reaction is oxidation of ammonium to nitrite by ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) represented by the "Nitrosomonas" genus. (wikipedia.org)
  • The second reaction is oxidation of nitrite (NO2−) to nitrate by nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB), represented by the "Nitrobacter" genus. (wikipedia.org)
  • Xenophilus is a genus of bacteria from the family Comamonadaceae. (wikipedia.org)
  • Amorphus is a genus of bacteria from the family of Methylocystaceae. (wikipedia.org)
  • habitats
  • Bacteria were among the first life forms to appear on Earth, and are present in most of its habitats. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, the group of lipophilic bacteria are not pathogenic, i.e. they don't cause food poisoning or food infection In terms of evolution, lipophilism can be regarded as fine-tuning the metabolism to lipophilic habitats. (wikipedia.org)
  • parasitic
  • Every single cell in your body contains mitochondria , which are self-replicating " organelles " that at one point were parasitic bacteria. (everything2.com)
  • sediment
  • Magnetite-producing magnetotactic bacteria are usually found in an oxic-anoxic transition zone (OATZ), the transition zone between oxygen-rich and oxygen-starved water or sediment. (wikipedia.org)
  • germs
  • If you're feeling crummy, it's probably because nasty bacteria or some other germs have gotten into your body and made you sick. (kidshealth.org)
  • Most people think bacteria are dangerous invisible "germs" that exist to make life miserable . (everything2.com)
  • indicator
  • Immunological methods using monoclonal antibodies can be used to detect indicator bacteria in water samples. (wikipedia.org)
  • This method can be used to recover specific indicator bacteria. (wikipedia.org)
  • Coliform bacteria are defined as rod-shaped Gram-negative non-spore forming and motile or non-motile bacteria which can ferment lactose with the production of acid and gas when incubated at 35-37°C. They are a commonly used indicator of sanitary quality of foods and water. (wikipedia.org)
  • infectious
  • Although most bacteria are harmless or often beneficial, some are pathogenic, with the number of species estimated as fewer than 100 that are seen to cause infectious diseases in humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bacillus
  • As numerous saprophytic bacteria are present in the feces, the resistance which the typhoid bacillus exhibits to carbolic acid can be made use of in obtaining the pure 1 Brit. (archive.org)
  • microbiota
  • Segmented filamentous bacteria or Candidatus Savagella are members of the gut microbiota of rodents, fish and chickens, and have been shown to potently induce immune responses in mice. (wikipedia.org)
  • tissues
  • The acid removes the stain from the tissues, and ultimately from the bacteria as well, so that one must watch carefully, and as soon as the color almost disappears from the sections remove them to absolute alcohol. (archive.org)
  • In 1926, Canadian physician Thomas Glover reported that he could consistently isolate a specific bacterium from the neoplastic tissues of animals and humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • antibiotics
  • The carbapenem-resistant enterobacteriaceae, or CRE, can defeat even last-resort antibiotics and have been dubbed 'nightmare bacteria' by the CDC. (newser.com)
  • cause
  • Pathogenic exogenous bacteria can enter a closed biological system and cause disease such as Cholera, which is induced by a waterborne microbe that infects the human intestine. (wikipedia.org)
  • occur
  • As will be mentioned hereafter, certain of the bacteria which occur in tissue do not allow of the ready penetra- tion of the color. (archive.org)
  • nutrients
  • Triatomine vectors have only one host and therefore must establish a relationship with bacteria to enable them to obtain the nutrients required to maintain themselves. (wikipedia.org)
  • found
  • In an ominous first, last month the CDC said antibiotic-resistant bacteria had been found in food for the first time . (newser.com)
  • This estimation of size almost prepares one for the estimation of weight given by Nageli, who found that an average bacterium under ordinary conditions weighed looooooinmr f a milligram. (archive.org)
  • Bacteria found in the gut may be related to colon cancer but may be more complicated due to the role of chemoprotective probiotic cancers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some of the researchers published reports that also claimed to have found bacteria associated with different types of cancers. (wikipedia.org)
  • viruses
  • While it would be impossible to scientifically verify it as of now, it is highly likely that much your DNA actually codes for the creation of bacteria and viruses that are essential for your very survival. (everything2.com)
  • lipids
  • Lipophilic bacteria (fat-loving bacteria) are bacteria that may proliferate in lipids. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some bacteria do not only accelerate their metabolism using lipids prevailing in their environment, some of them cannot proliferate without external lipid supply. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most materials in laboratories and health-care centers have small amounts of lipids on their surface, and thus may support the proliferation of lipophilic bacteria. (wikipedia.org)