• axilla
  • These techniques are classified by the level at which the needle or catheter is inserted for injecting the local anesthetic - interscalene block on the neck, supraclavicular block immediately above the clavicle, infraclavicular block below the clavicle and axillary block in the axilla (armpit). (wikipedia.org)
  • The axillary artery is a large muscular vessel that travels through the axilla . (kenhub.com)
  • As a result of this attachment, the axillary artery is more easily palpated in the concavity of the axilla when the upper arm is adducted (close to the midline of the body) and the suspensory ligaments are relaxed, than when it is abducted (away from the midline of the body) and the suspensory ligaments are taut. (kenhub.com)
  • While exiting the axilla, the axillary artery changes its name at the lower border of teres major and continues in the arm as the brachial artery . (kenhub.com)
  • The brachial plexus is responsible for cutaneous and muscular innervation of the entire upper limb, with two exceptions: the trapezius muscle innervated by the spinal accessory nerve (CN XI) and an area of skin near the axilla innervated by the intercostobrachial nerve. (wikipedia.org)
  • Typical arrangement of nerves around the axillary artery in the axilla ( Figure 136-2 ). (mhmedical.com)
  • Pectoral region Gross and applied anatomy of breast Actions of pectoralis major,minor and serratus anterior Brachial plexus Axilla : Boundaries and contents axillary group of lymph nodes in detail Back: Muscles of the back Shoulder: Muscles and movements of shoulder joint Free upper limb: Muscles of arm, forearm, hand and their actions. (studychacha.com)
  • Anatomy
  • During routine dissection in the Department of Anatomy following anatomical variations of phrenic nerve were observed on right side in the neck region of a 30 years old male cadaver. (indmedica.com)
  • Modern portable ultrasound devices allow the user to visualize internal anatomy, including the nerves to be blocked, neighboring anatomic structures and the needle as it approaches the nerves. (wikipedia.org)
  • palsy
  • Erb's palsy or Erb-Duchenne palsy is a paralysis of the arm caused by injury to the upper group of the arm's main nerves, specifically the severing of the upper trunk C5-C6 nerves. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other differential diagnoses that can mimick the symptoms of musculocutaneous palsy are: C6 radiculopathy (pain can be produced by movement of the neck), long head of biceps tendinopathy (no motor or sensory deficits), pain of the bicipital groove (relieved by shoulder joint injection). (wikipedia.org)
  • The clinical history is important in evaluating patients with suspected axillary nerve palsy. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • injury
  • Similarly, patients should be questioned and examined carefully for evidence of preexisting neurologic dysfunction in the ipsilateral arm and hand, since perioperative nerve injury is possible due to surgical (e.g., traction) or anesthetic (e.g., related to the nerve block) causes. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • Keeping the arm adducted during this step reduces risk of injury to the axillary sheath. (medscape.com)
  • Injury to the musculocutaneous nerve can be caused by three mechanisms: repeated microtrauma, indirect trauma or direct trauma on the nerve. (wikipedia.org)
  • In medicine, a stinger, also called a burner or nerve pinch injury, is a neurological injury suffered by athletes, mostly in high-contact sports such as ice hockey, rugby, American football, and wrestling. (wikipedia.org)
  • The most severe form of injury is nerve root avulsion, which usually accompanies high-velocity impacts that commonly occur during motor-vehicle collisions or bicycle accidents. (wikipedia.org)
  • The nerve is the largest unprotected nerve in the human body (meaning unprotected by muscle or bone), so injury is common. (wikipedia.org)
  • sheath
  • In most cases the nerve roots are stretched or torn from their origin, since the meningeal covering of a nerve root is thinner than the sheath enclosing the nerve. (wikipedia.org)
  • fibers
  • The PNS consists mainly of nerves, which are long fibers that connect the CNS to every other part of the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • sensory
  • The excessive stretch results in incomplete sensory and/or motor function of the injured nerve. (wikipedia.org)
  • List of sensory systems Sensory neuron Perception Visual system Auditory system Somatosensory system Vestibular system Olfactory system Taste Pain Neuron Interneuron Ganglion (PNS) vs Nucleus (neuroanatomy) (CNS) except basal ganglia (CNS) Nerve(PNS) vs Tract (neuroanatomy) (CNS) White matter (more myelinated) vs Grey matter Glial cells, commonly called neuroglia or glia, are supportive cells that maintain homeostasis, form myelin, and provide support and protection for the brain's neurons. (wikipedia.org)