• axilla
  • The axillary artery is a large muscular vessel that travels through the axilla . (kenhub.com)
  • As a result of this attachment, the axillary artery is more easily palpated in the concavity of the axilla when the upper arm is adducted (close to the midline of the body) and the suspensory ligaments are relaxed, than when it is abducted (away from the midline of the body) and the suspensory ligaments are taut. (kenhub.com)
  • While exiting the axilla, the axillary artery changes its name at the lower border of teres major and continues in the arm as the brachial artery . (kenhub.com)
  • injury
  • Similarly, patients should be questioned and examined carefully for evidence of preexisting neurologic dysfunction in the ipsilateral arm and hand, since perioperative nerve injury is possible due to surgical (e.g., traction) or anesthetic (e.g., related to the nerve block) causes. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • Keeping the arm adducted during this step reduces risk of injury to the axillary sheath. (medscape.com)
  • Injury to the musculocutaneous nerve can be caused by three mechanisms: repeated microtrauma, indirect trauma or direct trauma on the nerve. (wikipedia.org)
  • In medicine, a stinger, also called a burner or nerve pinch injury, is a neurological injury suffered by athletes, mostly in high-contact sports such as ice hockey, rugby, American football, and wrestling. (wikipedia.org)
  • The most severe form of injury is nerve root avulsion, which usually accompanies high-velocity impacts that commonly occur during motor-vehicle collisions or bicycle accidents. (wikipedia.org)
  • The nerve is the largest unprotected nerve in the human body (meaning unprotected by muscle or bone), so injury is common. (wikipedia.org)
  • Anatomy
  • During routine dissection in the Department of Anatomy following anatomical variations of phrenic nerve were observed on right side in the neck region of a 30 years old male cadaver. (indmedica.com)
  • Modern portable ultrasound devices allow the user to visualize internal anatomy, including the nerves to be blocked, neighboring anatomic structures and the needle as it approaches the nerves. (wikipedia.org)
  • trauma
  • Repeated nerve trauma can cause recurring stingers, chronic pain, and muscle weakness, while recovery can take weeks to months in severe cases. (wikipedia.org)
  • peripheral
  • Commonly employed techniques for obtaining such a needle position include transarterial, elicitation of a paresthesia, and use of a peripheral nerve stimulator or a portable ultrasound scanning device. (wikipedia.org)
  • A peripheral nerve stimulator connected to an appropriate needle allows emission of electric current from the needle tip. (wikipedia.org)
  • The axillary nerve is one of the most common peripheral nerves injured in athletes who participate in contact sports. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • Neurons are the core components of the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral nerves. (wikipedia.org)
  • anterior
  • Finally, the third part of the axillary artery gives off an anterior and a posterior circumflex humeral artery (ACHA & PCHA, respectively). (kenhub.com)
  • From here, the accessory nerve courses through the posterior triangle of the neck to enter the anterior border of the trapezius muscle at a point located approximately at the junction of the middle and lower thirds of the anterior border of this muscle. (wikipedia.org)
  • The merged nerve divides into the anterior and posterior division of C5 and C6. (wikipedia.org)
  • The five roots are the five anterior rami of the spinal nerves, after they have given off their segmental supply to the muscles of the neck. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] The musculocutaneous nerve, from C5, C6, C7, is the main supplier of muscles of the anterior compartment. (wikipedia.org)
  • fibers
  • The PNS consists mainly of nerves, which are long fibers that connect the CNS to every other part of the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • sensory
  • The excessive stretch results in incomplete sensory and/or motor function of the injured nerve. (wikipedia.org)
  • List of sensory systems Sensory neuron Perception Visual system Auditory system Somatosensory system Vestibular system Olfactory system Taste Pain Neuron Interneuron Ganglion (PNS) vs Nucleus (neuroanatomy) (CNS) except basal ganglia (CNS) Nerve(PNS) vs Tract (neuroanatomy) (CNS) White matter (more myelinated) vs Grey matter Glial cells, commonly called neuroglia or glia, are supportive cells that maintain homeostasis, form myelin, and provide support and protection for the brain's neurons. (wikipedia.org)
  • muscles
  • A bony fragment, pseudoaneurysm, hematoma, or callus formation of fractured clavcile can also put pressure on the injured nerve, disrupting innervation of the muscles. (wikipedia.org)
  • The compartments contain muscles which are innervated by the same nerve and perform the same action. (wikipedia.org)
  • This nerve continues in the arm, travelling in a plane between the biceps and triceps muscles. (wikipedia.org)