• Parkinson's
  • Stroke Parkinson's disease Alzheimer's disease Huntington's disease Multiple sclerosis Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis Rabies Schizophrenia Epilepsy Hydrocephalus Brain damage Traumatic brain injury Closed head injury Coma Paralysis Level of consciousness Neurosurgery Neuropsychology studies the structure and function of the brain related to psychological processes and behaviors. (wikipedia.org)
  • neurogenic
  • Fritz Köberle (October 1, 1910 in Eichgraben, Austria - February 20, 1983) was an Austrian-Brazilian physician, pathologist and scientist, discoverer of the neurogenic mechanism of the chronic phase of Chagas disease, a human parasitic disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, a protozoan. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other less typical phenomena observed in Chagas disease, such as bronchiectasis and myelopathy were also studied by Köberle under the new prism of his neurogenic theory. (wikipedia.org)
  • pathology
  • He was able to acquire during this period an enormous experience on the pathology of infectious diseases (bacterial dysentery, typhus, typhoid fever, tularemia and malaria) as well as war-inflicted wounds, and performing more than four thousand autopsies. (wikipedia.org)
  • While in Ribeirão Preto, Köberle noted that a promising field of research in pathology for the new department and himself could be Chagas disease, or American trypanosomiasis, which had been discovered by another Brazilian physician named Carlos Chagas, in 1910. (wikipedia.org)
  • synaptic
  • Numerous synaptic relays and neurotransmitters allow the autonomic control of organ function at local and central levels to be integrated with the requirements of the whole body. (oup.com)
  • Clinical
  • The most commonly used diagnostic criteria and definition of CFS for research and clinical purposes were published by the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). (wikipedia.org)
  • Phase
  • The oral phase, which is entirely voluntary, is mainly controlled by the medial temporal lobes and limbic system of the cerebral cortex with contributions from the motor cortex and other cortical areas. (wikipedia.org)
  • Even though 40 years had passed since its discovery, little was known about the peculiar manifestations of the chronic phase of the disease, such as megaesophagus, megacolon, cardiomegaly, heart ventricular aneurysm, achalasia, etc., and the mechanism of the causation of these several pathologies. (wikipedia.org)
  • patients
  • Other features in the three patients are a slow, unchanging pulse rate, incapacity to perspire, a lowered basal metabolism and signs of slight and indefinite changes in the nervous system. (wikipedia.org)
  • Group
  • She is Director of MD Studies in the Faculty of Medical Sciences at Newcastle, and a member of the Pharmacogenomics & Complex Disease Genetics Research Group She has worked on a wide range of research programmes. (wikipedia.org)
  • The familial amyloid neuropathies (or familial amyloidotic neuropathies, neuropathic heredofamilial amyloidosis, familial amyloid polyneuropathy) are a rare group of autosomal dominant diseases wherein the autonomic nervous system and/or other nerves are compromised by protein aggregation and/or amyloid fibril formation. (wikipedia.org)
  • control
  • Burn worked on the internal control of the body by the auto(matic)nomic nervous system, carrying out seminal work on the release of noradrenaline from these nerves and introducing the controversial Burn-Rand hypothesis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Study
  • Brain mapping Electrophysiology Extracellular recording Intracellular recording Brain stimulation Electroencephalography Intermittent rhythmic delta activity Category:Neurophysiology Neuroanatomy is the study of the anatomy of nervous tissue and neural structures of the nervous system. (wikipedia.org)
  • upper
  • An autonomic disorder characterized by excessive sweating of the forehead, upper lip, perioral region, or sternum subsequent to gustatory stimuli. (dmoztools.net)
  • levels
  • The respiratory system may contribute to oxygen levels through hyperventilation, though a sudden ischaemic episode may also proceed faster than the respiratory system can respond. (wikipedia.org)