• neurogenic
  • Fritz Köberle (October 1, 1910 in Eichgraben, Austria - February 20, 1983) was an Austrian-Brazilian physician, pathologist and scientist, discoverer of the neurogenic mechanism of the chronic phase of Chagas disease, a human parasitic disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, a protozoan. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other less typical phenomena observed in Chagas disease, such as bronchiectasis and myelopathy were also studied by Köberle under the new prism of his neurogenic theory. (wikipedia.org)
  • pathology
  • He was able to acquire during this period an enormous experience on the pathology of infectious diseases (bacterial dysentery, typhus, typhoid fever, tularemia and malaria) as well as war-inflicted wounds, and performing more than four thousand autopsies. (wikipedia.org)
  • While in Ribeirão Preto, Köberle noted that a promising field of research in pathology for the new department and himself could be Chagas disease, or American trypanosomiasis, which had been discovered by another Brazilian physician named Carlos Chagas, in 1910. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chagas
  • Chagas disease, also known as American trypanosomiasis, is a tropical parasitic disease caused by the protist Trypanosoma cruzi. (wikipedia.org)
  • Medication nearly always results in a cure if given early, but becomes less effective the longer a person has had Chagas disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is estimated that 6.6 million people, mostly in Mexico, Central America and South America, have Chagas disease as of 2015. (wikipedia.org)
  • Large-scale population movements have increased the areas where Chagas disease is found and these include many European countries and the United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • The disease was first described in 1909 by the Brazilian physician Carlos Chagas, after whom it is named. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chagas disease is classified as a neglected tropical disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • The most recognized marker of acute Chagas disease is called Romaña's sign, which includes swelling of the eyelids on the side of the face near the bite wound or where the bug feces were deposited or accidentally rubbed into the eye. (wikipedia.org)
  • include
  • Studies of human and animal motion include measures from motion tracking systems, electrophysiology of muscle and brain activity, various methods for monitoring physiological function, and other behavioral and cognitive research techniques. (wikipedia.org)
  • liver
  • 1790 William Austin A Treatise on the Stone, its origin and component parts 1791 John Ash 1792 William Saunders A Treatise on the Structure, Economy, and Diseases of the Liver. (wikipedia.org)
  • neural
  • Brain mapping Electrophysiology Extracellular recording Intracellular recording Brain stimulation Electroencephalography Intermittent rhythmic delta activity Category:Neurophysiology Neuroanatomy is the study of the anatomy of nervous tissue and neural structures of the nervous system. (wikipedia.org)
  • muscle
  • Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is a common disease in women caused by pelvic floor muscle weakness. (wikipedia.org)
  • Rarely, young children, or adults may die from the acute disease due to severe inflammation/infection of the heart muscle (myocarditis) or brain (meningoencephalitis). (wikipedia.org)
  • acute
  • The human disease occurs in two stages: an acute stage, which occurs shortly after an initial infection, and a chronic stage that develops over many years. (wikipedia.org)
  • respiratory
  • The respiratory system may contribute to oxygen levels through hyperventilation, though a sudden ischaemic episode may also proceed faster than the respiratory system can respond. (wikipedia.org)
  • digestive tract
  • About one-third of patients go on to develop digestive system damage, resulting in dilation of the digestive tract (megacolon and megaesophagus), accompanied by severe weight loss. (wikipedia.org)
  • Phase
  • The oral phase, which is entirely voluntary, is mainly controlled by the medial temporal lobes and limbic system of the cerebral cortex with contributions from the motor cortex and other cortical areas. (wikipedia.org)
  • Even though 40 years had passed since its discovery, little was known about the peculiar manifestations of the chronic phase of the disease, such as megaesophagus, megacolon, cardiomegaly, heart ventricular aneurysm, achalasia, etc., and the mechanism of the causation of these several pathologies. (wikipedia.org)
  • patients
  • Other features in the three patients are a slow, unchanging pulse rate, incapacity to perspire, a lowered basal metabolism and signs of slight and indefinite changes in the nervous system. (wikipedia.org)
  • understood
  • The initial triggers of Ménière's disease are not fully understood, with a variety of potential inflammatory causes that lead to endolymphatic hydrops (EH), a distension of the endolymphatic spaces in the inner ear. (wikipedia.org)
  • Group
  • She is Director of MD Studies in the Faculty of Medical Sciences at Newcastle, and a member of the Pharmacogenomics & Complex Disease Genetics Research Group She has worked on a wide range of research programmes. (wikipedia.org)