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  • systemic
  • Systemic sclerosis: Cold agglutinin disease has been described in patients with sclerodermic features, with the degree of anemia being associated with increasing disease activity of the patient's systemic sclerosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • This may suggest a close association between systemic rheumatic disease and autoimmune hematologic abnormalities. (wikipedia.org)
  • APS can be primary, if it occurs in the absence of any underlying disease, or secondary, if it is associated with another autoimmune disorder, most commonly systemic lupus erythematosus. (deepdyve.com)
  • M5 - systemic lupus erythematosus and undifferentiated collagenosis, autoimmune haemolytic anaemia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), also known simply as lupus, is an autoimmune disease in which the body's immune system mistakenly attacks healthy tissue in many parts of the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • Multicentric Castleman disease (MCD) involves "Castleman-like" lymph node changes at multiple sites and patients often demonstrate intense episodes of systemic inflammatory symptoms, polyclonal/reactive lymphocyte and plasma cell proliferation, autoimmune manifestations, and multiple organ system impairment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Systemic scleroderma, also called diffuse scleroderma or systemic sclerosis, is an autoimmune disease of the connective tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • platelets
  • In the mouse, pathogenic IgM anti-platelet autoantibodies have been reported in male (NZW × BXSB) F1 mice ( 8 ), and IgM Abs bound to platelets were found after immunization of mice with rat platelets ( 9 ). (jimmunol.org)
  • Phagocytosis of autoantibody-opsonized platelets may be enhanced by components of infectious agents such as bacterial LPS ( 17 ). (jimmunol.org)
  • Evans syndrome is an autoimmune disease in which an individual's antibodies attack their own red blood cells and platelets. (wikipedia.org)
  • Immune thrombocytopenic purpura is a condition in which platelets are destroyed by an autoimmune process. (wikipedia.org)
  • TTP, as with other microangiopathic hemolytic anemias (MAHAs), is caused by spontaneous aggregation of platelets and activation of coagulation in the small blood vessels. (wikipedia.org)
  • Laboratory tests may also reveal low levels of platelets (cells in the blood that aid in clotting), elevated lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, a chemical released from damaged cells, and which is therefore a marker of cellular damage), decreased haptoglobin (indicative of the breakdown of red blood cells), anemia (low red blood cell count)/schistocytes (damaged red blood cells), elevated creatinine (indicative of kidney dysfunction), and proteinuria (indicative of kidney injury). (wikipedia.org)
  • laboratory
  • Warm-reactive (immunoglobulin G) autoantibodies and laboratory testing best practices: review of the literature and survey of current practice. (springer.com)
  • Laboratory findings include severe anemia, increased mean corpuscular volume (MCV, due to the presence of a large number of reticulocytes), and hyperbilirubinemia (from increased red cell destruction) that can be of the conjugated or unconjugated type. (wikipedia.org)
  • disease
  • Th1 cells secreting interferon-γ have been implicated in autoimmune hemolytic anemia, so the aim was to determine which cytokine is more closely associated with disease severity. (haematologica.org)
  • Conclusions Interleukin-17A makes a previously unrecognized contribution to the autoimmune response in autoimmune hemolytic anemia, challenging the model that the disease is driven primarily by Th1 cells. (haematologica.org)
  • It is postulated that such calcineurin inhibitors, which selectively affect T-cell function and spare B-lymphocytes, may interfere with the deletion of autoreactive T-cell clones, resulting in autoimmune disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Autoantibodies in cold agglutinin disease are usually IgM. (merckmanuals.com)
  • Sometimes these antibodies themselves are harmless but suggest the presence of an autoimmune disease. (primaryimmune.org)
  • Haemolytic disease of the newborn (HDFN) due to alloanti-LW is described as mild and very rare, even the very potent anti-LWab of one known patient caused minimal evidence of HDFN in her three pregnancies. (wikipedia.org)
  • These classifications are based on the characteristics of the autoantibodies involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Patients with ALPS have a defect in this apoptotic pathway, leading to chronic non-malignant lymphoproliferation, autoimmune disease, and secondary cancers. (wikipedia.org)
  • No longer considered a subtype of ALPS but distinct disesase Treatment is most commonly directed at autoimmune disease and may be needed to treat bulky lymphoproliferation. (wikipedia.org)
  • In antenatal care, the IAT is used to screen pregnant women for antibodies that may cause hemolytic disease of the newborn. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hemolytic anemia Cold agglutinin disease List of hematologic conditions Moticka, Edward J. (2013). (wikipedia.org)
  • Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is an extremely rare, life-threatening, progressive disease that frequently has a genetic component. (wikipedia.org)
  • The requisite lymphocytosis of this disease is typically 2-20x109/L. Immunoglobulin derangements including hypergammaglobulinemia, autoantibodies, and circulating immune complexes are commonly seen. (wikipedia.org)
  • Castleman disease must be distinguished from other disorders that can demonstrate "Castleman-like" lymph node features, including reactive lymph node hyperplasia, autoimmune disorders, and malignancies. (wikipedia.org)
  • polyclonal
  • Another sign is autoimmune cytopenias and polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia and a family history of ALPS or non-malignant lymphoproliferation. (wikipedia.org)
  • commonly
  • Signs and symptoms of anemia are commonly found, due to the association between T-LGLL and erythroid hypoplasia. (wikipedia.org)
  • IL-6 is the most commonly elevated cytokine, but some affected people may have normal IL-6 levels and present with non-iron-deficient microcytic anemia. (wikipedia.org)
  • blood
  • Harmless pregnancy-induced warm autoantibodies to red blood cells. (springer.com)
  • The autoantibody model proposes that, through a mechanism not yet understood, certain drugs will cause antibodies to be made against red blood cells which again leads to the same destructive sequence. (wikipedia.org)
  • Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a condition in which the red blood cells that normally carry oxygen and carbon dioxide are destroyed by an autoimmune process. (wikipedia.org)
  • Careful compatibility testing by the blood bank is necessary because autoantibodies may interfere with blood typing. (wikipedia.org)
  • Red blood cells passing the microscopic clots are subjected to shear stress, which damages their membranes, leading to rupture of red blood cells within blood vessels, which in turn leads to anaemia and schistocyte formation. (wikipedia.org)
  • thrombosis
  • The exact pathogenetic mechanism of APS is unknown, but different, not mutually exclusive, models have been proposed to explain how anti-PL autoantibodies might lead to thrombosis and pregnancy morbidity. (deepdyve.com)
  • Complement
  • After addition of active complement to patient sera in vitro, six sera showed increased haemolytic activity. (biomedsearch.com)
  • The complement system activation may be due to mutations in the complement regulatory proteins (factor H, factor I, or membrane cofactor protein), or is occasionally due to acquired neutralizing autoantibody inhibitors of these complement system components, for example anti-factor H antibodies. (wikipedia.org)
  • pathological
  • Ehrlich later adjusted his theory to recognize the possibility of autoimmune tissue attacks, but believed certain innate protection mechanisms would prevent the autoimmune response from becoming pathological. (wikipedia.org)
  • uncommon
  • Auto anti-LW is not uncommon as an autoantibody but usually presents with transient suppression of the LW antigen in genetically LW+ individuals, and so appears to be an alloantibody. (wikipedia.org)
  • organ
  • One can die from severe anemia from massive acute bleeding due to hypoxia - decrease oxygenation to vitals organ that resulting in organ failure. (healthtap.com)
  • bind
  • We suggested that autoimmune CU may be caused by an imbalance of natural Abs, which bind to an epitope exposed after removal of IgE from FcεRIα. (jimmunol.org)
  • children
  • there are no reliable population-incidence figures, but it is believed to be responsible for about 40% of all autoimmune haemolytic anaemias that affect children (lower percentage for adults). (patient.info)