• hyoscyamine
  • Atropine, a naturally occurring belladonna alkaloid, is a racemic mixture of equal parts of d- and l-hyoscyamine, whose activity is due almost entirely to the levo isomer of the drug. (nih.gov)
  • bradycardia
  • Injections of atropine are used in the treatment of bradycardia (a heart rate (wikipedia.org)
  • Commonly used medications during a rapid sequence intubation: Etomidate Fentanyl Ketamine Midazolam Propofol Thiopental Succinylcholine Rocuronium Vecuronium Atropine - For patients where bradycardia is a concern Metaraminol or ephedrine, where hypotension (low blood pressure) may occur secondary to the sedating drugs Rapid sequence intubation refers to the pharmacologically induced sedation and neuromuscular paralysis prior to intubation of the trachea. (wikipedia.org)
  • parasympathetic
  • Atropine-induced parasympathetic inhibition may be preceded by a transient phase of stimulation, especially on the heart where small doses first slow the rate before characteristic tachycardia develops due to paralysis of vagal control. (nih.gov)
  • secretions
  • Atropine reduces secretions in the mouth and respiratory passages, relieves the constriction and spasm of the respiratory passages, and may reduce the paralysis of respiration, which results from actions of the toxic agent on the central nervous system. (nih.gov)
  • acetylcholine
  • As with other antimuscarinic agents, the major action of atropine is a competitive or surmountable antagonism, which can be overcome by increasing the concentration of acetylcholine at receptor sites of the effector organ (e.g., by using anticholinesterase agents, which inhibit the enzymatic destruction of acetylcholine). (nih.gov)
  • Atropine can be used to reduce the effect of the poisoning by blocking muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, which would otherwise be overstimulated, by excessive acetylcholine accumulation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Note that this circuit is not activated by acetylcholine, which is of particular importance because the administration of atropine will not block the vagal stimulation of the G cells, as ACh is not the neurotransmitter for these cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • amblyopia
  • In refractive and accommodative amblyopia, when occlusion is not appropriate sometimes atropine is given to induce blur in the good eye. (wikipedia.org)
  • drops
  • Atropine eye drops are used to prevent painful spasms in the ciliary muscle and to prevent a complication where the iris can stick to the lens. (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • Atropine eye drops may also be used to treat a lazy eye in children. (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • Atropine eye drops are also used to relax the ciliary muscle in a condition called anterior uveitis. (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • Atropine eye drops are used to prevent these problems. (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • Do not use atropine eye drops while wearing contact lenses. (wellspan.org)
  • Atropine eye drops have been shown to be effective in slowing the progression of myopia in children in several studies, but it is not available for this use, and side effects would limit its use. (wikipedia.org)
  • medication
  • Atropine is a medication to treat certain types of nerve agent and pesticide poisonings as well as some types of slow heart rate and to decrease saliva production during surgery. (wikipedia.org)
  • pupil
  • When you stop using atropine as part of a treatment programme it can take about a week for pupil size in the treated eye to return to normal. (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • occurs
  • Atropine occurs naturally in a number of plants of the nightshade family including deadly nightshade, Jimson weed, and mandrake. (wikipedia.org)
  • type
  • Atropine is also useful in treating second-degree heart block Mobitz type 1 (Wenckebach block), and also third-degree heart block with a high purkinje or AV-nodal escape rhythm. (wikipedia.org)