• ABCG1
  • Specifically, we expressed murine ABCG1 (mABCG1) in yeast and assessed how changes in the intracellular sterol environment affect movement of sterols by this transporter. (columbia.edu)
  • expression
  • This is especially relevant given that the expression of membrane transporters in diseases such as cancer can itself result from recapitulation of developmental pathways, including the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transformation pathways. (ucsd.edu)
  • translocate
  • Cultivated on inserts ECs bind, internalize, and translocate HDL from the apical to the basolateral compartment in a specific and temperature-dependent manner. (ahajournals.org)
  • utilize
  • Although most organisms utilize these ABC transporters during embryonic development, many of these transporters have broad substrate specificity, and their developmental functions remain incompletely understood. (ucsd.edu)
  • intracellular
  • These data suggest that direction of transport is not a static property of the transporter but rather can adapt in response to changes in the intracellular microenvironment. (columbia.edu)

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  • transport
  • While it is well appreciated that membrane transport is critical for development, the specific roles of many transporters have remained cryptic, in part because of their abundance and the diversity of their substrates. (ucsd.edu)
  • In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we have demonstrated that the opposite (i.e inward) transport of sterol in yeast is also dependent on two ABC transporters (Aus1p and Pdr11p). (columbia.edu)
  • This prompts the question what dictates directionality of sterol transport by ABC transporters. (columbia.edu)
  • This is the first example of an ABC transporter mediating bi-directional transport. (columbia.edu)
  • 8 Recently, we have shown that ECs bind, internalize, and transport lipid-free apoA-I in a specific manner. (ahajournals.org)
  • (ahajournals.org)
  • There are two types of active transport - primary active transport that uses ATP, and secondary active transport that uses an electrochemical gradient. (wikipedia.org)
  • reveal
  • These studies reveal that multifunctional transporters are required for signaling, homeostasis, and protection of the embryo, and shed light on how they are integrated into ancestral developmental pathways recapitulated in disease. (ucsd.edu)
  • roles
  • Further, as alluded to above, the actual function of those transporters in disease can be analogous to their developmental roles, such as controlling cell motility. (ucsd.edu)