• tumors
  • Without a doubt, astroblastoma remains one of the most challenging and problematic tumors to diagnose and treat among all nervous system cancers. (wikipedia.org)
  • The World Health Organization, a specialized agency that classifies abnormal tumors affecting the central nervous system and assesses potential risk to life, has difficulty in assigning a proper grade for astroblastoma. (wikipedia.org)
  • Astroblastoma can be divided into low-grade, well-differentiated tumors and high-grade, anaplastic subtypes. (wikipedia.org)
  • The majority of tumors exhibit a spherical perimeter with either a solid or cystic interior, comprising peripheral vasculature and epithelioid neoplasms. (wikipedia.org)
  • Calcification deriving from nervous system tumors is a rare quality in astroblastoma patients, but it is nonetheless easy to identify. (wikipedia.org)
  • An enormous difficulty lies in classifying an astroblastoma tumor due to its overlapping features with other brain tumors. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma, dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors, juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma, and hemangioblastoma are well-established, pediatric brain cancer tumors that are often confused with astroblastoma patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other histologic and immunohistochemical features, such as the degree of apparent cellular transformation along identifiable cell lineages (ependymal, glial, etc.), can be used to separate these tumors to some degree. (cancer.gov)