• fibrous
  • Chrysotile , the fibrous form of the mineral serpentine , is the best-known type and accounts for about 95 percent of all asbestos in commercial use. (britannica.com)
  • Pleural plaques: discrete fibrous or partially calcified thickened area which can be seen on X-rays of individuals exposed to asbestos. (wikipedia.org)
  • Asbestos is the generic term for a group of naturally occurring, fibrous minerals with high tensile strength, flexibility, and resistance to heat, chemicals, and electricity. (tn.gov)
  • Asbestos is a set of six naturally occurring silicate minerals, which all have in common their eponymous asbestiform habit: i.e. long (roughly 1:20 aspect ratio), thin fibrous crystals, with each visible fiber composed of millions of microscopic "fibrils" that can be released by abrasion and other processes. (wikipedia.org)
  • 19th century
  • Asbestos mining existed more than 4,000 years ago, but large-scale mining began at the end of the 19th century, when manufacturers and builders began using asbestos for its desirable physical properties. (wikipedia.org)
  • The contamination was the result of the activities of a local asbestos factory, part of the Turner & Newall (T&N) group (often referred to by the name of its founders, J.W. Roberts Ltd.) and occurred between the end of the 19th century and 1959 when the factory eventually closed. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1980s
  • By the 1980s and 1990s, asbestos trade and use were heavily restricted, phased out, or banned outright in an increasing number of countries. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since the 1980s various substitutes for asbestos have been developed for use in many products. (britannica.com)
  • citation needed] In many parts of the industrialized world, particularly the European Union, asbestos was phased out of building products beginning in the 1970s with most of the remainder phased out by the 1980s. (wikipedia.org)
  • dust
  • Asbestos use continued to grow through most of the 20th century until public knowledge (acting through courts and legislatures) of the health hazards of asbestos dust outlawed asbestos in mainstream construction and fireproofing in most countries. (wikipedia.org)
  • Women in the UK are more likely than those in any other nation to be diagnosed with mesothelioma, a rare form of cancer caused by asbestos dust. (huffingtonpost.co.uk)
  • These women have been exposed to asbestos dust from hospitals, husbands or fathers. (huffingtonpost.co.uk)
  • Asbestos materials that are badly damaged and releasing dust should be removed by licensed contractors. (bedford.gov.uk)
  • Described by Dr. Geoffrey Tweedale as a "social disaster", it involved the contamination with asbestos dust of an area consisting of around 1,000 houses in the Armley Lodge area of the city. (wikipedia.org)
  • Midland Works emitted vast quantities of asbestos dust, primarily through its ventilation system, which covered the nearby streets and rooftops of surrounding houses. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1978, however, Leeds City Council informed T&N that the factory was still "badly contaminated" with asbestos, with dust found in the basement, lift shaft, roof, ventilation shafts and beneath the floors. (wikipedia.org)
  • serpentine
  • Six mineral types are defined by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as "asbestos" including those belonging to the serpentine class and those belonging to the amphibole class. (wikipedia.org)
  • exposures
  • It reviews health concerns about asbestos exposures, plus options and resources to address these concerns. (ca.gov)
  • Asbestos exposures as short in duration as a few days have caused mesothelioma in humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although almost all the deaths and ill-health related to asbestos today are due to exposures that happened several decades ago, anybody who is likely to come into contact with asbestos needs to be particularly careful. (bedford.gov.uk)
  • Linda Reinstein
  • On 1 April 2004 Linda Reinstein and Doug Larkin founded the Asbestos Disease Awareness Organisation after both losing loved ones to Asbestos Related Disorders. (hubpages.com)
  • Linda Reinstein is the widow of Alan Reinstein who died on May 22 2006 after being diagnosed with the asbestos-related mesothelioma. (hubpages.com)
  • fireproof
  • Asbestos is a material naturally resistant to fires and therefore used in a variety of products to make them more fireproof. (ca.gov)
  • lung
  • Once there, they can cause local irritation or, in a small number of cases, cause asbestos or lung cancer which cannot be treated. (bedford.gov.uk)
  • It does not include a single lung cancer death caused by asbestos, although national estimates of lung cancer mortality from asbestos range from 5,000 to 10,000 per year during that time. (ewg.org)
  • If the data presented above are corrected to include lung and gastrointestinal cancer and more accurate estimates of mesothelioma incidence, nationwide, the total mortality from asbestos from 1979 through 2001 would be about 230,000 people. (ewg.org)
  • questions regardin
  • The information contained herein is intended to inform contractors and building owners of the notification requirements for asbestos renovation activity and the demolition of buildings in addition to providing information for commonly asked questions regarding asbestos related topics. (tn.gov)
  • amounts of asbestos
  • If you swallow large amounts of asbestos, some studies show there may be an increased risk of developing cancers in different organs associated with the throat and gastro-intestinal tract. (apsu.edu)
  • These facilities are of particular concern because exfoliation causes higher amounts of asbestos to be released than other processing methods. (ewg.org)
  • mineral
  • All six asbestos mineral types are known to be human carcinogens . (wikipedia.org)
  • Asbestos is a naturally occurring mineral. (ca.gov)
  • Asbestos was called the "miracle mineral" due to its many unique physical properties. (apsu.edu)
  • A natural mineral fiber that is either mined or quarried, asbestos can be spun, woven, or felted, almost like cotton and wool. (britannica.com)
  • Some of us walked after breakfast to examine the asbestos rocks, where we found plenty of that rare mineral between strata of rocks. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed
  • citation needed] Only a special vacuum cleaner that is designed for asbestos containment (class H) can be safely used when cleaning up during and after asbestos removal. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] An asbestos-containing building that is to be torn down may have to be sealed, and to have its asbestos safely removed before ordinary demolition can be performed. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] New innovative methods for asbestos removal have been used as well. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2017
  • The 2017 iteration of BADGES honored the work of U.S. Senator Barbara Boxer, a longtime champion of ADAO's ban asbestos efforts. (wikipedia.org)
  • ADAO
  • Since 2015, ADAO has sponsored a special photography exhibit called "BADGES: A Memorial Tribute to Asbestos Workers. (wikipedia.org)
  • One of the primary goals of ADAO is to see the banning of the use of asbestos world-wide. (hubpages.com)
  • commonly
  • Due to their mineralogical properties of having high strength, being an excellent insulator for heat and electricity, being able to resist heat without damage, being fairly good at resisting corrosion, and also having the ability to be woven into fabric, asbestos has been added to many different materials commonly used in buildings and different products. (apsu.edu)
  • minerals
  • Asbestos (the name originating from a Greek word meaning "inextinguishable) is the commercial name given to a set of six natural silicate minerals. (hubpages.com)
  • illnesses
  • At least 300 former employees are believed to have died from asbestos-related illnesses, and a number of cancer deaths in the Armley area were traced to the factory in 1988 as a result of an investigation by the Yorkshire Evening Post. (wikipedia.org)
  • made
  • These desirable properties made asbestos very widely used. (wikipedia.org)
  • Applications for any variance from asbestos control program rules or Part 56 of Title 12 of New York Codes, Rules and Regulations (Subpart 56-4 through 56-17) must be made directly to the Department of Environmental Protection at least two weeks prior to commencement of work. (nyc.gov)
  • In 1989 the U.S. government instituted a gradual ban on the manufacture, use, and export of most products made with asbestos. (britannica.com)
  • Individuals, including outside contractors, who perform jobs, i.e., pulling cables, conducting building repairs and/or renovations, etc., which disturb building materials or work in an area with suspected asbestos containing materials, should be made aware prior to work activities of the possibility of asbestos being present in the material(s). (xula.edu)
  • It is led by three boards (Board of Directors, Science Advisory Board, and Prevention Advisory Board), as well as a nationwide State Leadership Team made up of asbestos victims and advocates. (wikipedia.org)
  • Professor Peto said: "Asbestos in buildings have made a huge contribution to the British mesothelioma death rate. (huffingtonpost.co.uk)
  • Its natural fire-resisting characteristics as well as its insulating properties made it extremely popular and asbestos was used extensively in the building of hospitals, schools and residential homes. (hubpages.com)
  • In a joint effort between Asbestos Records, Chicago, IL's Underground Communiqué Records and Ska Is Dead, the three started a Ska Is Dead 7" Subscription Series made up of six split 7" records. (wikipedia.org)
  • The BoRit Asbestos Area is made up of three areas each under different ownership. (wikipedia.org)
  • Had this land been known to the ancients in the days of imperial Rome, many a mercantile pilgrimage would have been made to the Asbestos Mountains in Griqualand. (wikipedia.org)
  • Asbestos Man decides to spare the Torch, having already made a mockery of him. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lastly, the term hair-temperature pottery refers to ware made of fine, sorted clay tempered with about 30% finely cut hair and chamotte with similar shape, size, and surface treatment (including decoration) as the asbestos pottery. (wikipedia.org)
  • The analysis made by University of Lund, Department of Quaternary Geology, on asbestos pottery was quite unexpected, since this part of Northern Europe, usually considered to be a step behind the rest of Europe, actually introduced iron production in the pre-Roman Iron Age. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1986
  • Asbestos Convention, 1986 is an International Labour Organization Convention, adopted at the 72nd session of the International Labour Conference. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, the ban allowed installers to use up remaining stocks, so houses built as late as 1986 could still have asbestos in their acoustic ceilings. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1998
  • For example, the former seat of parliament of East Germany, the Palast der Republik, was stripped of most of its asbestos between 1998 and 2001, before it was finally demolished starting in 2006. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1,200
  • The best national estimates are about 1,200 asbestos-caused gastrointestinal cancers per year. (ewg.org)
  • material
  • Despite the severity of asbestos-related diseases, the material has extremely widespread use in many areas. (wikipedia.org)
  • This factsheet provides information to people who are trying to determine whether there is asbestos-containing material in their home or workplace, and what they might do if there is. (ca.gov)
  • Asbestos cannot be dyed easily, and the dyed material is uneven and has poor colourfastness. (britannica.com)
  • However, in general, people who become ill from inhaling asbestos have been regularly exposed in a job where they worked directly with the material. (wikipedia.org)
  • The label indicates that asbestos-containing materials are suspected or have been identified in the material that is labeled. (xula.edu)
  • The University's Asbestos Management Plan can be referenced to determine where asbestos is suspected or has been identified in a building before work activities begin, or a sample of the suspect material can be collected by Environmental Health and Safety representative and analyzed to determine the asbestos content. (xula.edu)
  • The Altadena Library District was awarded $72,000 Tuesday to remove potentially dangerous asbestos material from the ceiling and roof of the district's library at 600 E. Mariposa St. (latimes.com)
  • Due to asbestos-cement's imitation of more expensive materials such as wood siding and shingles, brick, slate, and stone, the product was marketed as an affordable renovation material. (wikipedia.org)
  • David Goldblatt from the University of the Witwatersrand wrote: Companies that mined asbestos in Western Australia and in South Africa were utterly contemptuous of the health of those who took the material out of the ground, those who milled, packed and transported it, those who lived anywhere near these operations, and of the land from which they took it. (wikipedia.org)
  • These small sections were then double wrapped in plastic, the minimum requirement when transporting asbestos material, and driven to a landfill. (wikipedia.org)
  • This method not only contained the asbestos material within the gunite and metal layers of the walls, but also kept workers at a safe distance since the saw was controlled remotely. (wikipedia.org)
  • Creek Falls
  • Reaching the falls requires a moderately difficult bushwhack to the edge of the canyon from just past Asbestos Creek Falls, which is countless times confused with Asbestos Falls. (wikipedia.org)
  • The falls are also simply known as Clear Creek Falls, but the official name is Asbestos Falls. (wikipedia.org)
  • Asbestos Creek Falls is a waterfall on Asbestos Creek, a small tributary of Clear Creek, located just below the mouth of Helena Creek. (wikipedia.org)
  • found
  • Asbestos may still be found in new buildings. (apsu.edu)
  • You should be aware of the fact that there is still asbestos present, and may be found in buildings you occupy. (apsu.edu)
  • Asbestos can be found in most commercial buildings built between 1950 and 1980, and many residential premises. (bedford.gov.uk)
  • It is found most frequently as a fire retardant in thermal insulation products, asbestos insulating board and ceiling tiles. (wikipedia.org)
  • regulations
  • It should be noted that asbestos regulations allow labels to be placed immediately adjacent to the known or suspected asbestos containing materials. (xula.edu)
  • Partly from inertia, partly for political and strategic reasons, the governments of Western Australia and South Africa were neither diligent in applying available knowledge to making asbestos mining safer, nor energetic in enforcing such regulations as they had. (wikipedia.org)
  • Different countries have different regulations and methods of enforcement, when it comes to asbestos removal. (wikipedia.org)
  • quantities
  • When they had either worked out the ore or lost their markets because the world got wise to asbestos, they simply ceased operations and walked away, leaving suffering and death and vast quantities of lethal asbestos tailings and spillage to blow in the wind. (wikipedia.org)
  • brittle
  • The County Board of Supervisors agreed to pass along a federal community development grant after county health officials confirmed that leaks in the library's roof had damaged parts of the asbestos-coated ceiling, leaving the spray-on covering brittle and susceptible to flaking. (latimes.com)
  • renovation
  • Demolition and asbestos renovation activities conducted in these counties are under the jurisdiction of a local air agency which is the point of contact for notification and permitting requirements. (tn.gov)
  • cause
  • Asbestos comes in six forms and is the known cause of the rare cancer with the blue and brown varieties considered the most dangerous. (huffingtonpost.co.uk)
  • Asbestos is the largest single cause of fatal disease caused by work in this country. (bedford.gov.uk)
  • Asbestos cannot cause harm through being swallowed or skin contact, and is therefore only a hazard in its dusty form. (bedford.gov.uk)
  • The link between asbestos and GI cancer is contested by industry and its insurance companies, but OSHA and the World Health Organization International Agency for Research on Cancer all have concluded that asbestos does cause some types of GI cancer (OSHA 1994, WHO 1989). (ewg.org)
  • Make others aware of your cause or show off your family and their accomplishments with the widest selection of customizable Asbestos bumper decals and car stickers online. (cafepress.com)
  • products
  • Asbestos was added to many building materials because of its ability to retard fire, strengthen products, and acoustically insulate. (apsu.edu)
  • Only a few asbestos products are actually banned in the United States. (apsu.edu)
  • You can still easily buy many asbestos products. (apsu.edu)
  • The University is minimizing procurement of asbestos products as much as possible. (apsu.edu)
  • These include motor vehicle manufacturing plants, harbours, shipyards, construction worksites as well as asbestos products manufacturing plants. (hubpages.com)
  • Due to health risks of asbestos products, the European Union has banned all use of asbestos, including asbestos roof shingles. (wikipedia.org)