• renal
  • Of patients undergoing angiography, 25-30% may have atheroembolic events, whereas 2.5-3% of patients undergoing percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) vein grafts and 1.4-3% of patients undergoing renal artery angioplasty or cardiac catheterization have been reported to have clinical signs of atheroemboli. (medscape.com)
  • If the ulcerated plaque is below the renal arteries the manifestations appear in both lower extremities. (wikipedia.org)
  • Renal artery stenosis can cause renovascular hypertension. (wikipedia.org)
  • veins
  • and -λογία, -logia) is the medical specialty which studies the diseases of the circulatory system and of the lymphatic system, i.e., arteries, veins and lymphatic vases, and its diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • cardiac
  • The most common cause of cardiac arrest is coronary artery disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cases have shown that the most common finding at postmortem examination of sudden cardiac death (SCD) is chronic high-grade stenosis of at least one segment of a major coronary artery, the arteries that supply the heart muscle with its blood supply. (wikipedia.org)
  • femoral
  • If your symptoms are less than six hours old, you may be eligible to undergo a procedure called mechanical thrombectomy, during which we place a catheter in the femoral artery in your groin, move the catheter to the clot in artery in your brain, and pull the clot out (aspirate). (mountsinai.org)
  • PMID 8746834 Femoral artery hypoplasia and persistent sciatic artery with blue toe syndrome: a case report, histologic analysis and review of the literature. (wikipedia.org)
  • occlusion
  • He observed "lacunae" (empty spaces) in the deep brain structures after occlusion of 200-800 μm penetrating arteries and connected them with five classic syndromes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lacunes are caused by occlusion of a single deep penetrating artery that arises directly from the constituents of the Circle of Willis, cerebellar arteries, and basilar artery. (wikipedia.org)
  • blood
  • Furthermore, cholesterol embolism may develop after the commencement of anticoagulants or thrombolytic medication that decrease blood clotting or dissolve blood clots, respectively. (wikipedia.org)
  • Findings on general investigations (such as blood tests) are not specific for cholesterol embolism, which makes diagnosis difficult. (wikipedia.org)
  • The main problem is the distinction between cholesterol embolism and vasculitis (inflammation of the small blood vessels), which may cause very similar symptoms - especially the skin findings and the kidney dysfunction. (wikipedia.org)
  • Blood clots in the arms can be caused by damaged arteries due to high blood pressure, smoking, heart disease and high cholesterol, states Healthline. (reference.com)
  • To treat an embolism, an individual either undergoes surgery to remove the blood clot or takes anticoagulants and thrombolytics, drugs that help to break up the blood clot and improve circulation. (reference.com)
  • Arteries - the larger blood vessels that carry blood from the heart throughout the body - can clog with plaques consisting of fat, cholesterol, and other substances. (wikihow.com)
  • High-fiber foods help to control both cholesterol and blood sugar levels. (wikihow.com)
  • Sodium (found in salt) has an impact on your blood pressure, and high blood pressure also puts you at a higher risk for artery hardening and damage. (wikihow.com)
  • Regular exercise helps you lose excess weight, relieves high blood pressure, and lowers LDL ("bad") cholesterol. (wikihow.com)
  • The central retinal artery is vital because it supplies blood to the inner two-thirds of the retina. (jomtonline.com)
  • Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults: executive summary of the third report of the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults (ATP III). (springer.com)
  • It also involves modification of risk factors for vascular disease like high cholesterol, high blood pressure. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cardiovascular risk factors such high blood pressure, elevated cholesterol and others fall under the specialty of vascular medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Watershed locations are those border-zone regions in the brain supplied by the major cerebral arteries where blood supply is decreased. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other risk factors include diabetes, high blood pressure, and high blood cholesterol. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dyslipidemia - a high level of low-density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol) and a low level of high-density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol) in the blood) - elevation of total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglyceride levels each have been correlated with accelerated PAD. (wikipedia.org)
  • The parietal pleura receives its blood supply from the intercostal arteries, which also supply the overlying body wall. (wikipedia.org)
  • vessel
  • Surgical embolectomy is the simple surgical removal of a clot following incision into a vessel by open surgery on the artery. (wikipedia.org)
  • hypoperfusion
  • Based on the high prevalence of microembolic signals documented by ultrasound in symptomatic carotid disease, a recent hypothesis postulates that embolism and hypoperfusion play a synergetic role, according to which small embolic material prone to lodge in distal field arterioles would be more likely to result in cortical micro-infarcts when chronic hypoperfusion prevails. (ahajournals.org)
  • aortic
  • Identifying patients at risk and making efforts to minimize aortic-wall trauma help reduce the chance of cholesterol embolism. (medscape.com)
  • Examples include abdominal traumas, aortic dissection, torsion of the splenic artery (for example, in wandering spleen) or external compression on the artery by a tumor. (wikipedia.org)
  • Tissue
  • Embolism to the legs causes a mottled appearance and purple discoloration of the toes, small infarcts and areas of gangrene due to tissue death that usually appear black, and areas of the skin that assume a marbled pattern known as livedo reticularis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Embolisms in the arms can eventually kill the surrounding tissue. (reference.com)
  • catheter
  • Typically this is done by inserting a catheter with an inflatable balloon attached to its tip into an artery, passing the catheter tip beyond the clot, inflating the balloon, and removing the clot by withdrawing the catheter. (wikipedia.org)
  • Atheroma
  • Occasionally, atheroma in the parent artery blocks the orifice of the penetrating artery (luminal atheroma), or atheroma involves the origin of the penetrating artery (junctional atheroma). (wikipedia.org)
  • affects
  • 17-19 In contrast, embolism from ICA disease preferentially affects the stem and large branches of the MCA, producing cortical "wedge-shaped" and/or deep striato-capsular infarcts. (ahajournals.org)
  • congenital
  • Structural heart disease not related to CAD (i.e. hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, congenital coronary artery anomalies, myocarditis) account for 10% of all SCDs. (wikipedia.org)
  • The field includes medical diagnosis and treatment of congenital heart defects, coronary artery disease, heart failure, valvular heart disease and electrophysiology. (wikipedia.org)
  • naturally
  • Sterols and stanols are naturally-occurring plant components that have been shown to help block the absorption of cholesterol in the body. (wikihow.com)