• strains
  • These researchers recognized the diversity of the DR-intervening sequences among different strains of M. tuberculosis and used this property to design a typing method that was named spoligotyping, which is still in use today. (wikipedia.org)
  • Strain Spyr1 metabolizes pyrene to 1-Hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid which subsequently is degraded via o -phthalic acid, a pathway also proposed for other Mycobacterium strains [ 1 ] exhibiting desirable PAH degradation properties as follows. (standardsingenomics.org)
  • The type strains of the other species of the genus Brachyspira share 95.9-99.4% 16S rRNA sequence identity with strain 56-150 T . GenBank contains 16S rRNA sequences for about 250 Brachyspira isolates, all of which share at least 96% sequence identity with strain 56-150 T [ 18 ]. (standardsingenomics.org)
  • methylation
  • In this protocol, we describe how to isolate endosperm and determine methylation by bisulfite sequencing. (jove.com)
  • According to the nomenclature describing histone modifications, first the histone is named, followed by the modified amino acid residue along with its position in the protein and lastly the type of chemical modification is included (for instance, H3K9me3 designates 3 methylation groups on lysine 9 in the histone H3 tail) ( 5 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • enzymes
  • Methanogens are also used in biogas production and sewage treatment, and biotechnology exploits enzymes from extremophile archaea that can endure high temperatures and organic solvents. (wikipedia.org)
  • genomic sequence
  • Therefore, a broad, modern working definition of a gene is any discrete locus of heritable, genomic sequence which affect an organism's traits by being expressed as a functional product or by regulation of gene expression. (wikipedia.org)
  • A gene is a locatable region of genomic sequence , corresponding to a unit of inheritance , which is associated with regulatory regions, transcribed regions and/or other functional sequence regions. (wikidoc.org)
  • bases
  • The structure of DNA was studied by Rosalind Franklin and Maurice Wilkins using X-ray crystallography, which led James D. Watson and Francis Crick to publish a model of the double-stranded DNA molecule whose paired nucleotide bases indicated a compelling hypothesis for the mechanism of genetic replication. (wikipedia.org)
  • A pair of nucleotide bases on complementary DNA or RNA strands organized in a double helix. (wikidoc.org)
  • repeats
  • A tool to facilitate the rapid analysis of single amino acid repeats at a proteome level. (omictools.com)
  • The organization of the repeats was unusual because repeated sequences are typically arranged consecutively along DNA. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2001, Mojica and Ruud Jansen, who was searching for additional interrupted repeats, proposed the acronym CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats) to alleviate the confusion stemming from the numerous acronyms used to describe the sequences in the scientific literature. (wikipedia.org)
  • species
  • The database allows for both individual and cross-species proteome analyses and also allows users to upload sequences of interest for analysis by the RepSeq algorithm. (omictools.com)
  • however, unlike plants and cyanobacteria, no known species of archaea does both. (wikipedia.org)
  • seawater
  • They were able to collect seawater or soil samples and sequence the DNA in the sample. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2002, Mya Breitbart, Forest Rohwer, and colleagues used environmental shotgun sequencing (see below) to show that 200 liters of seawater contains over 5000 different viruses. (wikipedia.org)
  • carbon
  • Archaea are a major part of Earth's life and may play roles in both the carbon cycle and the nitrogen cycle. (wikipedia.org)
  • libraries
  • Our new NEBNext® Ultra™ II FS DNA Library Prep Kit with novel fragmentation reagent meets the dual challenge of generating high quality next gen sequencing libraries from ever-decreasing input amounts AND simple scalability. (neb.com)
  • After leaving the Pace laboratory, Edward DeLong continued in the field and has published work that has largely laid the groundwork for environmental phylogenies based on signature 16S sequences, beginning with his group's construction of libraries from marine samples. (wikipedia.org)
  • different
  • In one such experiment, for instance, Margaret Saks, John Abelson, and colleagues at Caltech changed an E. coli arginine tRNA to specify a different amino acid, threonine. (antievolution.org)
  • A particular gene can have multiple different forms, or alleles , which are defined by different sequences of DNA . (wikidoc.org)
  • According to another study, when measured in a different solution, the DNA chain measured 22 to 26 ångströms wide (2.2 to 2.6 nanometres), and one nucleotide unit measured 3.3 Å (0.33 nm) long. (wikipedia.org)
  • found
  • Archaea were initially viewed as extremophiles living in harsh environments, such as hot springs and salt lakes, but they have since been found in a broad range of habitats, including soils, oceans, and marshlands. (wikipedia.org)
  • position
  • One of multiple alternative forms of a single gene , each of which is a viable DNA sequence occupying a given position, or locus on a chromosome . (wikidoc.org)
  • The scale bar indicates the number of substitutions per nucleotide position (Number of bootstrap analysis: 1000). (standardsingenomics.org)
  • The only observed difference among these is that the nucleotide at position 454 can be either T (in 6 of the copies) or C (two copies). (biomedcentral.com)
  • molecular
  • In this database, various physicochemical properties such as molecular weight, theoretical pI, amino acid composition, atomic composition, estimated half-life, instability index, aliphatic index and grand average of hydropathicity (Gravy) have been listed. (omictools.com)
  • integrates
  • Here, we present a method that integrates tumor barcoding with ultradeep barcode sequencing (Tuba-seq) to interrogate tumor-suppressor function in mouse models of human cancer. (stanford.edu)
  • long
  • For a long time, archaea were seen as extremophiles that only exist in extreme habitats such as hot springs and salt lakes. (wikipedia.org)
  • repeat
  • Also present, are a large number of other mobile genetic elements, such as insertion sequence (IS) transposable elements and miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs). (frontiersin.org)