• fetal
  • Apgar also promoted effective use of Rh testing, which can identify women who are at risk for transmission of maternal antibodies across the placenta where they may subsequently bind with and destroy fetal red blood cells, resulting in fetal hydrops or even miscarriage. (wikipedia.org)
  • infant
  • extremities well-flexed Cry Pink Source: Apgar, V., et al : Evaluation of the Newborn Infant-Second Report, Journal of American Medical Association, 168 (15): 1985-1988, December 1958. (ncdcr.gov)
  • babies
  • A study that compared babies born in Peru near sea level with babies born at very high altitude (4340 m) found a significant average difference in first Apgar score, but not the second. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dr. Ray's study found that mothers whose babies had a low Apgar score had a nine-time higher risk of ICU admission than those whose baby had a normal Apgar, even upon taking into account the mother's age, number of previous deliveries, economic status and whether she had certain chronic health conditions. (healthcanal.com)
  • Doctors expect that some babies may have lower Apgar scores. (dr-china.info)
  • assess
  • The Pediatric Glasgow Coma Scale (BrE) (also known as Pediatric Glasgow Coma Score (AmE) or simply PGCS) is the equivalent of the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) used to assess the level of consciousness of child patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • To the public, however, she is best known as the inventor of the Apgar score, a way to quickly assess the health of newborn children immediately after birth. (wikipedia.org)
  • birth
  • Baby gets an Apgar score at birth. (thebump.com)
  • Low Apgar scores are frequently recorded in children who are born pre-term and with low birth weight, or who are small for gestational age. (ubc.ca)
  • In 1978 North Carolina along with 37 other states and the District of Columbia began to routinely record one- and/or five-minute Apgar scores on birth certificates (15). (ncdcr.gov)
  • These scores were added to the certificate with the hope that they provided additional information, although subjective, on the health of infants at birth and on their chances of survival, i.e., information above and beyond that available in other after-birth indicators. (ncdcr.gov)
  • Usually after birth, a nurse or doctor may announce the Apgar scores to the labor room. (dr-china.info)
  • While the Apgar score has value in helping medical providers understand how a baby is doing immediately after birth, the score doesn't usually have any bearing on how healthy a baby is long term. (dr-china.info)
  • Also starting in 1959 until her death in 1974, Apgar worked for the March of Dimes Foundation, serving as vice president for Medical Affairs and directing its research program to prevent and treat birth defects. (wikipedia.org)
  • Apgar was also a lecturer (1965-1971) and then clinical professor (1971-1974) of pediatrics at Cornell University School of Medicine, where she taught teratology (the study of birth defects). (wikipedia.org)
  • time
  • A lower score means baby might need special attention - or she may just need a little time. (thebump.com)
  • In general medical journals, however, it is best to specify the time intervals, especially as the Apgar score may be assessed at other intervals, eg, 10, 15, or 20 minutes. (amamanualofstyle.com)
  • Well, the origin of "Apgar" in Apgar Score had been bugging me for quite some time now. (blogspot.com)
  • Although her work kept her busy, Apgar found time to pursue her many outside interests. (wikipedia.org)
  • scale
  • The Apgar scale is determined by evaluating the newborn baby on five simple criteria on a scale from zero to two, then summing up the five values thus obtained. (wikipedia.org)
  • risk
  • This is what I found about the reason for the APGAR : If the Apgar score remains below 3 at later times such as 10, 15, or 30 minutes, there is a risk that the child will suffer longer-term neurological damage. (preeclampsia.org)
  • The goal of this study was to determine whether the preoperative Risk Quantification Index (RQI) and Present-On-Admission Risk (POARisk) models would be improved by including the intraoperative Surgical Apgar Score (SAS). (asahq.org)
  • Low five-minute Apgar score has been associated with increased risk of severe neurologic outcome, but data on milder outcomes, particularly in the long term, are limited. (bu.edu)
  • health
  • In her fifties, Apgar started taking flying lessons, stating that her goal was to someday fly under New York's George Washington Bridge, and earned a master's degree in public health from Johns Hopkins University. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1959, Apgar left Columbia and earned a Master of Public Health degree from the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. (wikipedia.org)
  • condition
  • In the literature, Apgar scores of 0-3 have generally represented poor condition, 4-6 fair condition, and 7-10 good condition (1, 3-11, 15-16). (ncdcr.gov)
  • lower
  • The lower the score, the higher the chance that the child will require additional medical intervention, and probably, some level of early intervention . (ubc.ca)
  • years
  • To learn about the implications of having a low apgar scores in the middle childhood years, please visit the six to 12 part of this course . (ubc.ca)
  • universal
  • During the rubella pandemic of 1964-65, Apgar became an outspoken advocate for universal vaccination to prevent mother-to-child transmission of rubella. (wikipedia.org)