• heart
  • Birth defects, age-related changes, infections, or other conditions can cause one or more of your heart valves to not open fully or to let blood leak back into the heart chambers. (nih.gov)
  • Heart valves can have three basic kinds of problems: regurgitation, stenosis, and atresia. (nih.gov)
  • Prolapse" is when the flaps of the valve flop or bulge back into an upper heart chamber during a heartbeat. (nih.gov)
  • This prevents the heart valve from fully opening. (nih.gov)
  • Atresia occurs if a heart valve lacks an opening for blood to pass through. (nih.gov)
  • Eventually, you may need to have your faulty heart valve repaired or replaced. (nih.gov)
  • In contrast to most other heart murmurs, the murmur of mitral valve prolapse is accentuated by standing and valsalva maneuver (earlier systolic click and longer murmur) and diminished with squatting (later systolic click and shorter murmur). (wikipedia.org)
  • Rheumatic fever is common worldwide and responsible for many cases of damaged heart valves. (wikipedia.org)
  • changes
  • The cardinal anatomic changes of the valve include leaflet thickening, commissural fusion, and shortening and thickening of the tendinous cords. (wikipedia.org)
  • late
  • Upon auscultation of an individual with mitral valve prolapse, a mid-systolic click, followed by a late systolic murmur heard best at the apex is common. (wikipedia.org)