• adherent culture of rat thoracic aorta
  • The technique of double immunofluorescence was employed to simultaneously label an adherent culture of rat thoracic aorta (A-10 line) cells (illustrated above) with mouse anti-histone and rabbit anti- beta -catenin primary antibodies, followed by goat anti-mouse and anti-rabbit secondary antibodies conjugated to Marina Blue (histones) and Rhodamine Red-X ( beta -catenin), respectively. (fsu.edu)
  • The adherent culture of rat thoracic aorta cells featured in the digital image above was stained with Alexa Fluor 488 conjugated to the lectin concanavalin A. Alexa Fluor 568 conjugated to phalloidin and DAPI were also used to label the culture, targeting filamentous actin and nuclear DNA, respectively. (fsu.edu)
  • chest
  • the large upper part of the ascending arch and descending aorta, supplying many parts of the body, such as the heart, ribs, chest muscles, and stomach. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Injury of the thoracic aorta refers to any injury which affects the portion of the aorta which lies within the chest cavity. (wikipedia.org)
  • The use of chest tubes in postoperative thoracic care was reported in 1922, and they were regularly used post-thoracotomy in World War II, though they were not routinely used for emergency tube thoracostomy following acute trauma until the Korean War. (wikipedia.org)
  • smooth muscl
  • Found primarily lining the hollow organs of the body, such as the thoracic aorta from which A-10 cells were derived, smooth muscle cells are usually arranged in dense sheets. (fsu.edu)
  • rupture
  • There are several terms which are interchangeably used to describe injury to the aorta such as tear, laceration, transection, and rupture. (wikipedia.org)
  • inferior
  • Throughout human evolution, the first thoracic and inferior cervical ganglia merged - and this resulting ganglion is called the stellate ganglion (so called because of its radiating pattern similar in appearance to a star). (wikipedia.org)
  • relaxation
  • Mechanisms of adenosine triphosphate-, thrombin-, and trypsin-induced relaxation of rat thoracic aorta. (ahajournals.org)
  • Relaxation of the rat thoracic aorta with adenosine triphosphate, thrombin, and/or trypsin was associated with increased levels of cyclic guanosine monophosphate in both time- and concentration-dependent manners. (ahajournals.org)
  • compliance
  • Theoretically, the systemic pulse pressure can be conceptualized as being proportional to stroke volume, or the amount of blood ejected from the left ventricle during systole and inversely proportional to the compliance of the aorta. (wikipedia.org)
  • The aorta has the highest compliance in the arterial system due in part to a relatively greater proportion of elastin fibers versus smooth muscle and collagen. (wikipedia.org)
  • Presence
  • There are usually 22-23 pairs of these ganglia: 3 in the cervical region (cervical ganglia), 11 in the thoracic region (note the presence of the stellate cervicothoracic ganglia), 4 in the lumbar region and 4-5 in the sacral region. (wikipedia.org)
  • hypothermic
  • Primary Objective: The aim of this study is to assess the effects of Aprotinin (an antifibrinolytic drug used to reduce bleeding during cardiac surgery) on renal function in patients undergoing surgery with use of hypothermic bypass and circulatory arrest for repair of the thoracic aorta. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • deceleration
  • It may be due to different rates of deceleration of the heart and the aorta, which is in a fixed position. (wikipedia.org)
  • The tethering of the aorta by the ligamentum arteriosum makes the site prone to shearing forces during sudden deceleration. (wikipedia.org)
  • severe
  • Objectives To examine the thoracic aorta of patients with severe cholesterol embolism (CE) by transoesophageal echocardiography (TOE). (bmj.com)
  • patients
  • Methods The thoracic aorta of 20 consecutive patients with CE was compared with that in a control population matched for age and risk factors by TOE. (bmj.com)
  • The aims of this study were to investigate the thoracic aorta of patients with CE by transoesophageal echocardiography (TOE) and to evaluate the efficacy of steroid treatment in these patients. (bmj.com)
  • The data demonstrate acceptable results for a new-generation endograft in series of patients with diverse thoracic aortic pathology. (inserm.fr)
  • thus it is much more common for hospital staff to treat patients with partially torn aortas. (wikipedia.org)
  • atherosclerosis
  • 4-6 Fatty 'dots' and streaks, which may represent the early stages of atherosclerosis, have been found in the aortas of babies and infants. (scielo.org.za)
  • Heart
  • Since the aorta branches directly from the heart to supply blood to the rest of the body, the pressure within it is very great, and blood may be pumped out of a tear in the blood vessel very rapidly. (wikipedia.org)
  • The aorta may also be torn at the point where it is connected to the heart. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since high blood pressure could exacerbate an incomplete tear in the aorta or even separate it completely from the heart, which would almost inevitably kill the patient, hospital staff take measures to keep the blood pressure low. (wikipedia.org)
  • Interrupted aortic arch is a very rare heart defect (affecting 3 per million live births) in which the aorta is not completely developed. (wikipedia.org)
  • structures
  • A more recently proposed mechanism is that the aorta can be compressed between bony structures (such as the manubrium, clavicle, and first rib) and the spine. (wikipedia.org)
  • portion
  • In the ascending aorta (the portion of the aorta which is almost vertical), one mechanism of injury is torsion (a two-way twisting). (wikipedia.org)
  • body
  • Complex surgery of the ascending thoracic aorta and the aortic arch requires use of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) with moderate or profound total body hypothermia and circulatory arrest. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • site
  • In the aorta it travels with the blood stream to any desired position distal to the site of entry. (ebscohost.com)