• Paranoid
  • An investigation of the early relationship between couples that experience what was formerly referred to as Paranoid Wife Syndrome, but not more widely referred to as Paranoid Personality Disorder, tends to show a strong attraction between the spouses when they first began their romantic relationship (Williams, Trick, & Troum, 1981). (wikipedia.org)
  • Therefore, the infant must keep these loving and hating emotions as distinct as possible, because of the paranoid anxiety that the destructive force of the bad object will destroy the loving object from which the infant gains refuge against the bad objects. (wikipedia.org)
  • immature
  • In the case of too much gratification, the child does not learn that he or she does not control the environment, and that gratification is not always immediate, thereby forming an immature personality. (wikipedia.org)
  • neurosis
  • He argued that adult neurosis (functional mental disorder) often is rooted in childhood sexuality, and consequently suggested that neurotic adult behaviors are manifestations of childhood sexual fantasy and desire. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dissociation
  • Structural dissociation of the personality" is used by Otto van der Hart and colleagues to distinguish dissociation they attribute to traumatic or pathological causes, which in turn is divided into primary, secondary and tertiary dissociation. (wikipedia.org)
  • psychological
  • A defence mechanism is an unconscious psychological mechanism that reduces anxiety arising from unacceptable or potentially harmful stimuli. (wikipedia.org)
  • neurotic
  • Through the course of the marriage, a series of negative interactions, influenced by neurotic motivations, between the spouses will reveal their anxieties to one another and result in the development of the syndrome (Williams, Trick, & Troum, 1981). (wikipedia.org)
  • situations
  • Generalised anxiety disorder (also referred to as GAD) is a long-term condition that causes sufferers to feel anxious about a variety of situations/issues, rather than one specific situation. (counselling-directory.org.uk)
  • Meditation enables a way of stepping out of anxiety, not identifying with it, creating stillness and learning to better accept and tolerate challenging situations. (counselling-directory.org.uk)
  • We can identify people, places and situations where anxiety attacks happen as being the causes of our attacks. (counselling-directory.org.uk)
  • Ellert Nijenhuis and colleagues suggest a distinction between personalities responsible for day-to-day functioning (associated with blunted physiological responses and reduced emotional reactivity, referred to as the "apparently normal part of the personality" or ANP) and those emerging in survival situations (involving fight-or-flight responses, vivid traumatic memories and strong, painful emotions, the "emotional part of the personality" or EP). (wikipedia.org)
  • explosive
  • The DSM-IV-TR was very specific in its definition of Intermittent Explosive Disorder which was defined, essentially, by exclusion of other conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • social anxiety
  • They are saying that they are feeling 'stressed', unable to sleep, weepy and are then having issues around social anxiety, in that they experience panic attacks or relate that they feel 'ill' and are worried about being seriously ill or of being sick in public. (counselling-directory.org.uk)
  • They may look for this way out by claiming illness (which can feel or indeed become very real) or social anxiety requiring that they sit exams in smaller classrooms with less people. (counselling-directory.org.uk)
  • gratification
  • It is a selfish, childish, pleasure-oriented part of the personality with no ability to delay gratification. (wikipedia.org)
  • Yet, thwarting of the oral-stage - too much or too little gratification of desire - might lead to an oral-stage fixation, characterised by passivity, gullibility, immaturity, unrealistic optimism, which is manifested in a manipulative personality consequent to ego malformation. (wikipedia.org)
  • include
  • Other sources of continuity include androgyny, sadism, and the aggressive "western eye," which seeks to refine and dominate nature's ceaseless hostility and thus has created our art and cinema. (wikipedia.org)