• Paranoid
  • An investigation of the early relationship between couples that experience what was formerly referred to as Paranoid Wife Syndrome, but not more widely referred to as Paranoid Personality Disorder, tends to show a strong attraction between the spouses when they first began their romantic relationship (Williams, Trick, & Troum, 1981). (wikipedia.org)
  • Therefore, the infant must keep these loving and hating emotions as distinct as possible, because of the paranoid anxiety that the destructive force of the bad object will destroy the loving object from which the infant gains refuge against the bad objects. (wikipedia.org)
  • behaviors
  • Hence, personality disorders are defined by experiences and behaviors that differ from societal norms and expectations. (wikipedia.org)
  • The following two additional criteria have been proposed to complement the above-mentioned criteria: victim distress (victim suffers mild to severe psychological, social or physical trauma) and provocation (bullying is motivated by perceived benefits of their aggressive behaviors). (wikipedia.org)
  • Physical abuse often does not occur in isolation, but as part of a constellation of behaviors including authoritarian control, anxiety-provoking behavior, and a lack of parental warmth. (wikipedia.org)
  • cognition
  • Personality disorders (PD) are a class of mental disorders characterized by enduring maladaptive patterns of behavior, cognition, and inner experience, exhibited across many contexts and deviating markedly from those accepted by the individual's culture. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2013, the American Psychiatric Association (APA) redefined mental disorders in the DSM-5 as "a syndrome characterized by clinically significant disturbance in an individual's cognition, emotion regulation, or behavior that reflects a dysfunction in the psychological, biological, or developmental processes underlying mental functioning. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dissociation
  • Structural dissociation of the personality" is used by Otto van der Hart and colleagues to distinguish dissociation they attribute to traumatic or pathological causes, which in turn is divided into primary, secondary and tertiary dissociation. (wikipedia.org)
  • behavior characterized
  • however, it is widely agreed that bullying is a subcategory of aggressive behavior characterized by the following three minimum criteria: hostile intent (i.e., the harm caused by bullying is deliberate, not accidental), imbalance of power (i.e., bullying includes a real or perceived power inequity between the bully and the victim), and repetition over a period of time (i.e., more than once with the potential to occur multiple times). (wikipedia.org)
  • Neglect
  • However, if we have experienced too much anxiety in our childhood, due to severe abuse, neglect or overly anxious parents, it can make us act in unpredictable ways and make us prone to mood swings. (counselling-directory.org.uk)
  • psychological
  • A defence mechanism is an unconscious psychological mechanism that reduces anxiety arising from unacceptable or potentially harmful stimuli. (wikipedia.org)
  • neurotic
  • Through the course of the marriage, a series of negative interactions, influenced by neurotic motivations, between the spouses will reveal their anxieties to one another and result in the development of the syndrome (Williams, Trick, & Troum, 1981). (wikipedia.org)
  • situations
  • Generalised anxiety disorder (also referred to as GAD) is a long-term condition that causes sufferers to feel anxious about a variety of situations/issues, rather than one specific situation. (counselling-directory.org.uk)
  • Meditation enables a way of stepping out of anxiety, not identifying with it, creating stillness and learning to better accept and tolerate challenging situations. (counselling-directory.org.uk)
  • We can identify people, places and situations where anxiety attacks happen as being the causes of our attacks. (counselling-directory.org.uk)
  • Personality disorders are also inflexible and pervasive across many situations, largely due to the fact that such behavior may be ego-syntonic (i.e. the patterns are consistent with the ego integrity of the individual) and are therefore perceived to be appropriate by that individual. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ellert Nijenhuis and colleagues suggest a distinction between personalities responsible for day-to-day functioning (associated with blunted physiological responses and reduced emotional reactivity, referred to as the "apparently normal part of the personality" or ANP) and those emerging in survival situations (involving fight-or-flight responses, vivid traumatic memories and strong, painful emotions, the "emotional part of the personality" or EP). (wikipedia.org)
  • social anxiety
  • They are saying that they are feeling 'stressed', unable to sleep, weepy and are then having issues around social anxiety, in that they experience panic attacks or relate that they feel 'ill' and are worried about being seriously ill or of being sick in public. (counselling-directory.org.uk)
  • They may look for this way out by claiming illness (which can feel or indeed become very real) or social anxiety requiring that they sit exams in smaller classrooms with less people. (counselling-directory.org.uk)
  • include
  • Other sources of continuity include androgyny, sadism, and the aggressive "western eye," which seeks to refine and dominate nature's ceaseless hostility and thus has created our art and cinema. (wikipedia.org)