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  • Paranoid
  • An investigation of the early relationship between couples that experience what was formerly referred to as Paranoid Wife Syndrome, but not more widely referred to as Paranoid Personality Disorder, tends to show a strong attraction between the spouses when they first began their romantic relationship (Williams, Trick, & Troum, 1981). (wikipedia.org)
  • Therefore, the infant must keep these loving and hating emotions as distinct as possible, because of the paranoid anxiety that the destructive force of the bad object will destroy the loving object from which the infant gains refuge against the bad objects. (wikipedia.org)
  • immature
  • In the case of too much gratification, the child does not learn that he or she does not control the environment, and that gratification is not always immediate, thereby forming an immature personality. (wikipedia.org)
  • chronic
  • Persistent Depressive Disorder Persistent Depressive Disorder is a chronic depression that is also called dysthymia. (psycologyfacts.com)
  • People with the condition have a multiple spectrum of disorders are marked by emotional instability, difficulty in maintaining close relationships, eating disorders , impulsivity, chronic uncertainty about life goals and addictive behaviors such as using drugs and alcohol. (psychcentral.com)
  • A combination of talking therapy to address the underlying cause of the chronic stress and anxiety, a daily meditation routine, a tailor-made natural treatment protocol and a desire and willingness to remove some of the most stressful elements of your life, can restore your adrenal health and reduce the feelings of overwhelming anxiety. (counselling-directory.org.uk)
  • dependent
  • The concept of codependency overlaps with, but developed in the mainstream independently from, the older psychoanalytic concept of the passive dependent personality which is attaching oneself to a stronger personality. (wikipedia.org)
  • All three theories have contributed to the concept of dependent personality disorder as defined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) of the American Psychiatric Association. (wikipedia.org)
  • In Zorica Markovic's (1999) comparison of psychoanalytic conceptions of marital relationships, similarities are drawn between Knight Adrich's (1966) observations of hostile-dependent relationship styles and Bela Mittelmann's work on aggressive relationships. (wikipedia.org)
  • neurosis
  • He argued that adult neurosis (functional mental disorder) often is rooted in childhood sexuality, and consequently suggested that neurotic adult behaviors are manifestations of childhood sexual fantasy and desire. (wikipedia.org)
  • emotional
  • In his practice he sees a number of clients with emotional, anxiety and self-esteem that have relevance to us all. (counselling-directory.org.uk)
  • Ellert Nijenhuis and colleagues suggest a distinction between personalities responsible for day-to-day functioning (associated with blunted physiological responses and reduced emotional reactivity, referred to as the "apparently normal part of the personality" or ANP) and those emerging in survival situations (involving fight-or-flight responses, vivid traumatic memories and strong, painful emotions, the "emotional part of the personality" or EP). (wikipedia.org)
  • Dissociation
  • Structural dissociation of the personality" is used by Otto van der Hart and colleagues to distinguish dissociation they attribute to traumatic or pathological causes, which in turn is divided into primary, secondary and tertiary dissociation. (wikipedia.org)
  • psychological
  • A defence mechanism is an unconscious psychological mechanism that reduces anxiety arising from unacceptable or potentially harmful stimuli. (wikipedia.org)
  • neurotic
  • Through the course of the marriage, a series of negative interactions, influenced by neurotic motivations, between the spouses will reveal their anxieties to one another and result in the development of the syndrome (Williams, Trick, & Troum, 1981). (wikipedia.org)
  • explosive
  • The DSM-IV-TR was very specific in its definition of Intermittent Explosive Disorder which was defined, essentially, by exclusion of other conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • social anxiety
  • They are saying that they are feeling 'stressed', unable to sleep, weepy and are then having issues around social anxiety, in that they experience panic attacks or relate that they feel 'ill' and are worried about being seriously ill or of being sick in public. (counselling-directory.org.uk)
  • They may look for this way out by claiming illness (which can feel or indeed become very real) or social anxiety requiring that they sit exams in smaller classrooms with less people. (counselling-directory.org.uk)
  • Social anxiety disorder, which was formerly known as social phobia, is where people become anxious or stressed and social situations. (counselling-directory.org.uk)
  • psychological
  • A 2007 report by the American Psychological Association found that a culture-wide sexualization of girls and women was contributing to increased female anxiety associated with body image. (wikipedia.org)
  • A defence mechanism is an unconscious psychological mechanism that reduces anxiety arising from unacceptable or potentially harmful stimuli. (wikipedia.org)
  • In psychoanalytic theory, defence mechanisms (German: Abwehrmechanismen) are psychological strategies brought into play by the unconscious mind to manipulate, deny, or distort reality in order to defend against feelings of anxiety and unacceptable impulses and to maintain one's self-schema. (wikipedia.org)
  • According to psychology author George K. Simon, successful psychological manipulation primarily involves the manipulator: Concealing aggressive intentions and behaviors. (wikipedia.org)
  • thus
  • Sexual infantilism: in pursuing and satisfying his or her libido (sexual drive), the child might experience failure (parental and societal disapproval) and thus might associate anxiety with the given erogenous zone. (wikipedia.org)
  • The signalling function of anxiety is thus seen as crucial, and biologically adapted to warn the organism of danger or a threat to its equilibrium. (wikipedia.org)
  • intent
  • Overt aggression, on the other hand, includes behaviors that do not hide the aggressive intent and are open in their intentions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Vilifying the victim: More than any other, this tactic is a powerful means of putting the victim on the defensive while simultaneously masking the aggressive intent of the manipulator, while the manipulator falsely accuses the victim as being an abuser in response when the victim stands up for or defends themselves or their position. (wikipedia.org)
  • Social
  • The disorder is usually, but not invariably, associated with significant problems in occupational and social performance. (wikipedia.org)
  • This led to their book, Social Learning Theory, published in 1941, which posited that personality consisted of learned habits. (wikipedia.org)
  • Among the purposes of ego defence mechanisms is to protect the mind/self/ego from anxiety or social sanctions or to provide a refuge from a situation with which one cannot currently cope. (wikipedia.org)
  • Stigma and discrimination can add to the suffering and disability associated with mental disorders, leading to various social movements attempting to increase understanding and challenge social exclusion. (wikipedia.org)
  • often
  • One way to minimize the chances of being lied to is to understand that some personality types (particularly psychopaths) are experts at the art of lying and cheating, doing it frequently, and often in subtle ways. (wikipedia.org)
  • societal
  • Hence, personality disorders are defined by experiences and behaviors that differ from societal norms and expectations. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, when the id impulses (e.g., desire to have sexual relations with a stranger) conflict with the superego (e.g., belief in societal conventions of not having sex with unknown persons), unsatisfied feelings of anxiousness or feelings of anxiety come to the surface. (wikipedia.org)
  • symptoms
  • The typical presenting symptoms in different regions of the world may also vary depending on how the disorder is depicted by the media. (wikipedia.org)
  • emotions
  • Ellert Nijenhuis and colleagues suggest a distinction between personalities responsible for day-to-day functioning (associated with blunted physiological responses and reduced emotional reactivity, referred to as the "apparently normal part of the personality" or ANP) and those emerging in survival situations (involving fight-or-flight responses, vivid traumatic memories and strong, painful emotions, the "emotional part of the personality" or EP). (wikipedia.org)
  • include
  • Females are much more than medication and the phonological processing disorder are very obvious which include family and friends influence. (blogspot.com)
  • structures
  • Freud proposed three structures of the psyche or personality: Id: The id is the unconscious reservoir of the libido, the psychic energy that fuels instincts and psychic processes. (wikipedia.org)
  • people
  • Probably, but it is hard to treat people with personality disorders with compassion, because they tend to be so obnoxious. (fluther.com)
  • People who have unreasonable fears to objects, animals, events or locations are experiencing an anxiety disorder. (blogspot.com)
  • Apart from overnight sleep testing, certain sleep disorder centers perform daytime multiple sleep latency testing also on people suffering from an eating disorder, depending on the phonological processing disorder between anorexia and bulimia because they are good role models. (blogspot.com)
  • In 1941, she proposed that some people adopt what she termed a "Moving Toward" personality style to overcome their basic anxiety. (wikipedia.org)
  • theory
  • According to the personality theory developed by Henry Murray (1938) and further developed by David McClelland (1985), these motives could be described as a need for affiliation (n aff) and power (n pow). (antiochian.org)
  • presence
  • Purposely avoiding the presence of a coworker you know is searching for your assistance could be considered physical-passive-direct. (wikipedia.org)
  • identity
  • The id dominates, because neither the ego nor the super ego is yet fully developed, and, since the infant has no personality (identity), every action is based upon the pleasure principle. (wikipedia.org)