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  • impulsivity
  • In psychology, impulsivity (or impulsiveness) is a tendency to act on a whim, displaying behavior characterized by little or no forethought, reflection, or consideration of the consequences. (wikipedia.org)
  • Neurobiological findings suggest that there are specific brain regions involved in impulsive behavior, although different brain networks may contribute to different manifestations of impulsivity, and that genetics may play a role. (wikipedia.org)
  • High PCL-R scores are positively associated with measures of impulsivity and aggression, Machiavellianism, persistent criminal behavior, and negatively associated with measures of empathy and affiliation. (wikipedia.org)
  • developmental
  • Currently, two possible developmental courses are thought to lead to conduct disorder. (wikipedia.org)
  • Research has shown that there is a greater number of children with adolescent-onset conduct disorder than those with childhood-onset, suggesting that adolescent-onset conduct disorder is an exaggeration of developmental behaviors that are typically seen in adolescence, such as rebellion against authority figures and rejection of conventional values. (wikipedia.org)
  • These developmental trajectories suggest the existence of antisocial pathways in certain individuals, which have important implications for both research and treatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Recent developmental research has documented links between executive functioning deficits and physical aggression, but the role of executive functioning in physical aggression's more cognitively complex counterpart, relational aggression, is less established and may differ across boys and girls. (ubc.ca)
  • Både nationellt och internationellt har jag en rad olika förtroendeuppdrag, till exempel som gästforskare vid Centralinstitutet för mental hälsa vid Heidelbergs universitet, gästforskare vid Curtin University i Perth, grundare och styrelsemedlem i Scientific Society Autism Spectrum, redaktör för "Autism: the international journal of research and practice", biträdande redaktör för the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, och chefredaktör för Scandinavian Journal of Child Psychiatry and Psychology. (ki.se)
  • cognitive
  • Antisocial youth with CU traits tend to have a range of distinctive cognitive characteristics. (wikipedia.org)
  • He had led an active and successful life as a general practitioner until he rapidly became unable to continue his work because of cognitive deficits, attention problems, irritability, mood changes (dysphoria alternating with episodes of constricted affect and anxiety), and ritualised behaviours. (bmj.com)
  • inhibition
  • According to inhibition theory, it is natural for one to alternate between periods of attention and distraction. (wikipedia.org)
  • Specifically, for girls, deficits in inhibition and shifting and working memory were associated with higher ratings of relational aggression, but for boys, poor inhibition predicted higher relational aggression. (ubc.ca)
  • There is some evidence to support deficits in response inhibition as one such marker. (wikipedia.org)
  • specifically
  • The purpose of this study is to learn more about the functioning of particular types of regions of the brain, specifically, those related to externalizing disorders such as Attention Defic. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Specifically, the mechanism of directed attention employs the prefrontal cortex (PFC), the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and the brain stem's basal ganglia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mental Disorders
  • Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (4th ed. (bsl.nl)
  • To be diagnosed per the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-V), symptoms must be observed in multiple settings for six months or more and to a degree that is greater than others of the same age. (forumotion.com)
  • A CU specifier has been included as a feature of conduct disorder in the fifth revision of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5). (wikipedia.org)
  • mood
  • Other common neurological features are seizures, syncope, or stroke-like events, often combined with a frontal subcortical pattern of behavioural dysfunction and psychiatric symptoms such as psychosis, mood disorders, and dementia. (bmj.com)
  • severe
  • Children with CU traits have more severe conduct disorder, and respond to different management. (wikipedia.org)
  • Neuropsychological deficits included a severe dysexecutive syndrome, anterograde amnesia, and attentional impairment. (bmj.com)
  • A neuropsychological investigation showed a severe impairment of memory functions, verbal more than figural, and reduced psychomotor speed and verbal associative skills (table 1), but no ideomotor apraxia, dysarthria, or visuoconstructive impairment. (bmj.com)
  • tasks
  • Although one's efforts may involve very different tasks, each incoming stimulus calls upon the same directed attention mechanism. (wikipedia.org)
  • page needed] Directed attention, or voluntary attention, requires a great deal of concentration and focus, and is employed in tasks such as problem solving. (wikipedia.org)
  • Studies that require participants to carry out attention-demanding tasks under conditions of high distraction reveal how unpleasant a mentally fatigued person can be. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fatigue that is experienced by participants of these kinds of studies is induced by attention-intensive tasks, and the observed effects of such fatigue are correlated with decline in inhibitory control. (wikipedia.org)
  • children
  • Symptoms occurring in children with these disorders include: defiance of authority figures, angry outbursts, and other antisocial behaviors. (bioportfolio.com)
  • If the caregiver is able to provide therapeutic intervention teaching children at risk better empathy skills, the child will have a lower incident level of conduct disorder. (wikipedia.org)
  • There is debate among professionals regarding the validity and appropriateness of diagnosing young children with conduct disorder. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is also argued that some children may not in fact have conduct disorder, but are engaging in developmentally appropriate disruptive behavior. (wikipedia.org)
  • Continuity and change in levels of externalizing behavior in school of children from economically disadvantaged families. (bsl.nl)
  • Apparently children of parents who are both unemployed are at a higher risk for developing a mental disorder. (pendulum.org)
  • Children as young as nine years can be diagnosed with this disorder, which exhibits itself with troublesome or antisocial behavior in the child, that persists for a long period of time. (6543654.com)
  • However, studies also show that children diagnosed with Conduct Disorder seem to have an impairment in the frontal lobe of the brain, the part which we use to avoid harm, learn from negative experiences, and plan ahead. (6543654.com)
  • Children with difficult temperament are more likely to develop Conduct Disorder. (6543654.com)
  • As they say, prevention is better than cure, so in order to prevent Conduct Disorder with young people, parents really need to be cooperative and supportive in bringing up their children. (6543654.com)
  • Most symptoms seen in children with conduct disorder also occur at times in children without this disorder. (novanthealth.org)
  • But in children with conduct disorder, these symptoms occur more often. (novanthealth.org)
  • Children with high CU traits are less responsive to time-out and other punishment techniques than are healthy children as they are unperturbed by the threat of punishment and time-out does not seem to bother them, so their behavior does not improve. (wikipedia.org)
  • Reward-based disciplining techniques, such as praise and reinforcement, tend to have a greater effect than punishing techniques on children with high CU traits in reducing antisocial behavior. (wikipedia.org)
  • Thus, we know that his long-term outlook without treatment is relatively poor: 40% of children with conduct disorder go on to be convicted of three offences by age 17 ( Farrington, 1995 ), so saying that he will 'grow out of it' would be untrue. (rcpsych.org)
  • traits
  • The interplay between genetic and environmental risk factors may play a role in the expression of these traits as a conduct disorder (CD). (wikipedia.org)
  • Hypoactivity in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in combination with CU traits seem to cause antisocial behavior even without external hardships. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is a 20-item inventory of perceived personality traits and recorded behaviors, intended to be completed on the basis of a semi-structured interview along with a review of 'collateral information' such as official records. (wikipedia.org)
  • distinguish
  • The condition can be difficult to tell apart from other disorders, as well as to distinguish from high levels of activity that are still within the normal-range. (wikipedia.org)
  • attentional
  • page needed] Hence, there are two types of attention, distinguished in terms of the effort involved in their use and their changes in attentional shift: Involuntary attention refers to attention that requires no effort at all, as when something exciting or interesting happens. (wikipedia.org)
  • adolescent
  • Outcome parameters associated with perceived helpfulness of family-based treatment for adolescent eating disorders. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Family-based treatment (FBT) is an efficacious treatment for adolescent eating disorders, yet it is not routinely implemented in clinical practice. (bioportfolio.com)