• cationic
  • α- and β-defensins are small cationic peptides contained in the large granule subset of primary/azurophil granules (reviewed in Ref. 16 ) that exert antiviral activities against different enveloped viruses such as CMV, influenza, HSV-1 and -2, and vesicular stomatitis virus ( 17 ). (jimmunol.org)
  • helical
  • The secondary structures of these molecules follow 4 themes, including i) α-helical, ii) β-stranded due to the presence of 2 or more disulfide bonds, iii) β-hairpin or loop due to the presence of a single disulfide bond and/or cyclization of the peptide chain, and iv) extended. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mice
  • Viral loads in neutrophil-depleted mice were not diminished by LTB 4 administration, and a substantial reduction in the presence of murine cathelicidin-related antimicrobial peptide and the murine eosinophil-related RNase family in lung tissue was observed. (jimmunol.org)
  • protein
  • The cytoplasmic membrane is a frequent target, but peptides may also interfere with DNA and protein synthesis, protein folding, and cell wall synthesis. (wikipedia.org)
  • bacterial
  • The initial contact between the peptide and the target organism is electrostatic, as most bacterial surfaces are anionic, or hydrophobic, such as in the antimicrobial peptide Piscidin. (wikipedia.org)
  • In general the antimicrobial activity of these peptides is determined by measuring the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC), which is the lowest concentration of drug that inhibits bacterial growth. (wikipedia.org)
  • different
  • Indeed, FPR2 prefers a very different set of ligands and has some very different functions than FPR1 while FPR3 does not bind FMLP or many other N-formyl peptides which bind to FPR1 or FPR2. (wikipedia.org)