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  • patients
  • If these patients are prescribed warfarin for another medical purpose, they will require lower doses than usual because the patient is already deficient in VKORC. (wikipedia.org)
  • DOACs
  • In a paper recently published in the British Medical Journal, Vonpgradova reported findings from a prospective open-cohort study investigating the correlation between DOACs and risks of bleeding as compared with the relationship between warfarin and the same endpoints. (eso-stroke.org)
  • The present study provides data indicating that in comparison to warfarin, DOACs are a reasonable choice with better safety profiles in both patients with and without AF. (eso-stroke.org)
  • Therefore, the present data will be important in guiding physicians in considering DOACs as the preferred anticoagulant option. (eso-stroke.org)
  • Using the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination database, we identified 16 977 patients who underwent 13 types of high-risk endoscopic procedures and took preoperative warfarin or DOACs from 2014 to 2015. (ovid.com)
  • efficacy
  • With its positive efficacy and safety profile which is well established worldwide, Pradaxa ® offers substantial advantages over warfarin for AF patients requiring anticoagulant treatment," stated Professor Klaus Dugi, Corporate Senior Vice President Medicine, Boehringer Ingelheim. (boehringer-ingelheim.com)
  • The draft guideline recommends that Phase III trials of anticoagulant treatments for patients with AF should be designed to include a primary composite efficacy endpoint that shows a treatment's ability to reduce the number of thromboembolic events, including ischaemic strokes, undefined strokes and systemic embolic events (SEE). (boehringer-ingelheim.com)
  • apixaban
  • The overall mean age was 73.9 (SD 12.7), ranging from a mean of 71.0 (warfarin) to 83.9 (apixaban). (bmj.com)
  • Propensity
  • One-to-one propensity score matching was performed to compare postendoscopy GI bleeding and thromboembolism between the warfarin and DOAC groups. (ovid.com)
  • therapeutic
  • The therapeutic effect of warfarin exists within a narrow therapeutic window as dictated by the INR. (docplayer.net)
  • Type A: Augmented pharmacologic effects - dose dependent and predictable Type A reactions, which constitute approximately 80% of adverse drug reactions, are usually a consequence of the drug's primary pharmacological effect (e.g. bleeding when using the anticoagulant warfarin) or a low therapeutic index of the drug (e.g. nausea from digoxin), and they are therefore predictable. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2016
  • Using data from two large United Kingdom primary care databases, between 2011 and 2016 a total of 196,061 anticoagulant users who had no anticoagulant prescriptions in the year prior to study entry were identified. (eso-stroke.org)
  • closely
  • These workers believe the rat to be the preferred experimental animal in the study of 4-hydroxycoumarin anticoagulants, as the response of the rat is most closely parallel to that of the human. (jamanetwork.com)
  • He remained closely involved in the biochemistry of warfarin and related compounds. (wikipedia.org)
  • vitamin
  • The action of this class of anticoagulants may be reversed by administering vitamin K for the duration of the anticoagulant's residence in the body, and the daily dose needed for reversal is the same for all drugs in the class. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, in the case of the second generation "super warfarins" intended to kill warfarin resistant rodents, the time of vitamin K administration may need to be prolonged to months, in order to combat the long residence time of the poison. (wikipedia.org)
  • clinical
  • The increased anticoagulant response to warfarin seen with increasing patient age persisted even after simultaneously controlling for relevant demographic and clinical variables in a multivariate model. (umassmed.edu)
  • People using anticoagulants to treat this condition should avoid using bed rest as a complementary treatment because there are clinical benefits to continuing to walk and remaining mobile while using anticoagulants in this way. (wikipedia.org)
  • compounds
  • Warfarin, one of the several compounds synthesised as part of the coumarin research, was patented in 1945 with the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation, Link and researchers Stahmann and Ikawa jointly owning the patent. (wikipedia.org)
  • poison
  • In 1948 a potent synthetic form of dicumarol was originally introduced as an extremely effective rodent (small mammals of the order Rodentia, which includes rats, squirrels, and beavers) poison called warfarin (named for the patent holder, Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation). (discoveriesinmedicine.com)
  • Although warfarin rapidly became very popular worldwide as a rat poison, medical practitioners hesitated to use it on patients because it seemed so toxic (poisonous). (discoveriesinmedicine.com)
  • dosage
  • Their intake should be avoided whilst taking anticoagulants or, if coagulability is being monitored, their intake should be kept approximately constant so that anticoagulant dosage can be maintained at a level high enough to counteract this effect without fluctuations in coagulability. (wikipedia.org)
  • protein
  • In contrast, increased formation of malondialdehyde (MDA), with a decrease in protein and non-protein thiols in homogenates of warfarin-treated skin was demonstrated, pointing to prooxidant activity in warfarin-treated skin. (ac.rs)
  • The principal plasma proteins for drug binding are: albumin α1-acid glycoprotein lipoproteins Some drug interactions with warfarin are due to changes in protein binding. (wikipedia.org)
  • reactions
  • However, the indandiones are generally more toxic than warfarin, with hypersensitivity reactions involving many organs and sometimes resulting in death. (wikipedia.org)
  • bound
  • Therefore it is concluded that the orientation of the 4-hydroxycoumarin nucleus is the same for the phenprocoumon isomers, but different for the warfarin isomers, when bound to human serum albumin. (aspetjournals.org)
  • This means that of the amount of warfarin in the blood, 97% is bound to plasma proteins. (wikipedia.org)
  • treatment
  • The authors suspect that this may reflect the closer monitoring of patients undergoing treatment with warfarin or may be related to unmeasured confounding due to prescribing choices related to underlying comorbidities. (eso-stroke.org)
  • The use of anticoagulants has become the standard treatment in treating this abnormality. (wikipedia.org)
  • differences
  • No evident differences in skin histology between control and warfarin-treated skin were found at that time point, while striking changes in tissue integrity, cellularity and appearance 72h following WF application were noted. (ac.rs)
  • rats
  • Presented data demonstrate the potential of epicutaneously applied warfarin to modulate local skin activity in rats. (ac.rs)
  • patients
  • If these patients are prescribed warfarin for another medical purpose, they will require lower doses than usual because the patient is already deficient in VKORC. (wikipedia.org)
  • prothrombin
  • Anti-ApoH and a subset of anti-cardiolipin antibodies bind to ApoH, which in turn inhibits Protein C, a glycoprotein with regulatory function upon the common pathway of coagulation (by degradating activated factor V). Lupus anticoagulant (LAC) antibodies bind to prothrombin, thus increasing its cleavage to thrombin, its active form. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Lupus anticoagulant antibodies are those that show the closest association with thrombosis, those that target β2glycoprotein 1 have a greater association with thrombosis than those that target prothrombin. (wikipedia.org)
  • caution
  • Although cruciferous vegetables are generally safe for human consumption, individuals with known allergies or hypersensitivities to a certain Brassica vegetable, or those taking anticoagulant therapy, require caution before consuming such vegetables. (wikipedia.org)
  • treatment
  • This is actually the expected profile of the fairly high-dose anticoagulant that gives better efficacy compared with enoxaparin treatment at a expense of the greater threat of bleeding, and it is a characteristic of the treatment as opposed to the timing of administration. (pkainhibitors.com)
  • blood
  • The diagnostic criteria require one clinical event (i.e. thrombosis or pregnancy complication) and two antibody blood tests spaced at least three months apart that confirm the presence of either lupus anticoagulant or anti-β2-glycoprotein-I (since β2-glycoprotein-I antibodies are a subset of anti-cardiolipin antibodies, an anti-cardiolipin assay can be performed as a less specific proxy). (wikipedia.org)
  • Cholesterol embolism (often cholesterol crystal embolism or atheroembolism, sometimes blue toe or purple toe syndrome or trash foot or warfarin blue toe syndrome) occurs when cholesterol is released, usually from an atherosclerotic plaque, and travels as an embolus in the bloodstream to lodge (as an embolism) causing an obstruction in blood vessels further away. (wikipedia.org)
  • Disease
  • Antiphospholipid syndrome is an autoimmune disease, in which "antiphospholipid antibodies" (anticardiolipin antibodies and lupus anticoagulant) react against proteins that bind to anionic phospholipids on plasma membranes. (wikipedia.org)
  • people
  • I've decided to put this page together because on looking around the internet I see heaps of rubbish, mis-information and myth out there for people who are on anticoagulants. (blogspot.com)
  • usually
  • Looking at the research, by following good practices (simple really) you can make life on warfarin much safer than the stats that are usually presented. (blogspot.com)