• organism
  • The mouse has since been used extensively as a model organism and is associated with many important biological discoveries of the 20th and 21st Centuries. (wikipedia.org)
  • Screening in model organism offers the advantage of interrogating test agents, or alterations in targets of interest, in the context of fully integrated, assembled, biological systems, providing insights that could otherwise not be obtained in cellular systems. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sequencing of the human and other model organism genomes has produced increasingly large volumes of data relevant to immunology research and at the same time huge amounts of functional and clinical data are being reported in the scientific literature and stored in clinical records. (wikipedia.org)
  • multiple sclerosis
  • This review aims to provide an update on the most recent evidence of therapeutically-relevant neuro-immuneinteractions following NPC transplants in animal models of multiple sclerosis, cerebral stroke and traumas of the spinal cord, and consideration of the forthcoming challenges related to the early translation of some of these exciting experimental outcomes into clinical medicines. (wingsforlife.com)
  • human
  • Neuro-immune interactions of neural stem cell transplants: from animal disease models to human trials. (wingsforlife.com)
  • Stem cell technology is a promising branch of regenerative medicine that is aimed at developing new approaches for the treatment of severely debilitating human diseases, including those affecting the central nervous system (CNS). (wingsforlife.com)
  • Large animal models, such as domesticated farm animals, offer some distinct advantages over rodent models, including a larger brain that is amenable to imaging and intracerebral therapy, longer lifespan, and a more human-like neuro-architecture. (medindia.net)
  • Not only does a rodent's small brain often preclude the use of advanced neuroimaging techniques, it is also not clear how intracerebral application of trophic factors, transplant therapies, and gene therapies in small animals might translate to the much larger human brain. (medindia.net)
  • Importantly, the brains of large animals can be studied using sensitive measures that should be highly translatable to the human condition, including MRI and PET imaging, EEG, and electrophysiology, as well as behavioral tests looking at motor and cognitive function," says Professor Jenny Morton, PhD, of the Department of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience at the University of Cambridge. (medindia.net)
  • In conjunction, these models reflect the diversity and utility of tools used to study human disease. (springer.com)
  • The mission of the 7th Aquatic Animal Mod-els of Human Disease Conference is to provide scientists using aquatic animal models a unique opportunity to exchange scientific information, identify research tools and opportunities, address environmental health issues, and encourage the utility of aquatic models for the study of human disease. (xenbase.org)
  • This venue will encourage development of an appreciation of aquatic animal models and their contributions to understanding human disease. (xenbase.org)
  • We hope to see you at the 7th Aquatic Animal Models of Human Disease Conference as it returns to Texas. (xenbase.org)
  • Genesis, the Journal of Genetics and Development will sponsor a $500 travel award for the best abstract on Xenopus research submitted by a junior researcher to the 7th Aquatic Animal Models of Human Disease Conference. (xenbase.org)
  • Animal models are used by scientists to replicate human diseases in another living animal, allowing them to study the biology of the disease and test potential treatments. (understandinganimalresearch.org.uk)
  • This was shown in human Muse cells infused into animal models with fulminant hepatitis, partial hepatectomy, muscle degeneration, skin injury, stroke and spinal cord injury. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although kindling is a widely used model, its applicability to human epilepsy is controversial. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, in both human epilepsy and in some animal models, evidence suggests that a process like that found in kindling does occur. (wikipedia.org)
  • Further research by Goddard on the characteristics of the kindling phenomenon led to his conclusion that kindling can be used to model human epileptogenesis, learning and memory. (wikipedia.org)
  • The publication of these results opened a completely new niche for epilepsy research and has stimulated a significant amount of studies on the subject of kindling and its relevance to human epilepsy Kindling (sedative-hypnotic withdrawal) Epileptogenesis Racine Stages (a method by which seizure severity is quantified in animal models of epilepsy) Bertram E (2007). (wikipedia.org)
  • While studies to date imply that the EETs, EET-forming epoxygenases, and EET-inactivating sEH can be manipulated to control a wide range of human diseases, clinical studies have yet to prove this. (wikipedia.org)
  • Determination of the role of the EETS in human diseases is made particularly difficult because of the large number of EET-forming epoxygenases, large number of epoxygenase substrates other than arachidonic acid, and the large number of activities, some of which may be pathological or injurious, that the EETs possess. (wikipedia.org)
  • This close relationship, the associated high homology with humans, their ease of maintenance and handling, and their high reproduction rate, make mice particularly suitable models for human-oriented research. (wikipedia.org)
  • They are widely considered to be the prime model of inherited human disease and share 99% of their genes with humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • An article in The Scientist notes, "The difficulties associated with using animal models for human disease result from the metabolic, anatomic, and cellular differences between humans and other creatures, but the problems go even deeper than that" including issues with the design and execution of the tests themselves. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some have argued that cellular based systems are unable to adequately model human disease processes that involve many different cell types across many different organ systems and that this type of complexity can only be emulated in model organisms. (wikipedia.org)
  • The directive stresses the use of the 3R principle (replacement, refinement, reduction) and animal welfare when conducting animal testing on non-human primates. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some genetically modified mammals are used as models of human diseases and potential treatments and cures can first be tested on them. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is possible since mice can be created with the same mutations that occur in human genetic disorders, the production of the human disease in these mice then allows treatments to be tested. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fluorescent pigs can be used to study human organ transplants, regenerating ocular photoreceptor cells, neuronal cells in the brain, regenerative medicine via stem cells, tissue engineering, and other diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Robert J. Desnick, Ph.D., M.D., (born July 12, 1943) is a human geneticist whose basic and translational research accomplishments include significant discoveries in genomics, pharmacogenetics, gene therapy, personalized medicine, and the treatment of genetic diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Immunology research is important for understanding the mechanisms underlying the defense of human body and to develop drugs for immunological diseases and maintain health. (wikipedia.org)
  • Methods that rely on sequence comparison are diverse and have been applied to analyze HLA sequence conservation, help verify the origins of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) sequences, and construct homology models for the analysis of hepatitis B virus polymerase resistance to lamivudine and emtricitabine. (wikipedia.org)
  • endemic
  • Affecting over a hundred million individuals worldwide, retinal diseases are among the leading causes of irreversible visual impairment and blindness, and appropriate study models, especially animal models, are essential to furthering our understanding of the etiology, pathology, and progression of these endemic diseases. (springer.com)
  • Our primary objective is to develop methods to rapidly detect and predict the risk of introduction and spread as well as support the risk-based, more cost-effective, prevention, control and eradication of endemic, emerging and re-emerging animal diseases throughout the world. (ucdavis.edu)
  • Ontology
  • Uberon is a comparative anatomy ontology representing a variety of structures found in animals, such as lungs, muscles, bones, feathers and fins. (wikipedia.org)
  • One of the uses of this ontology is to integrate data from different biological databases, and other species-specific ontologies such as the Foundational Model of Anatomy. (wikipedia.org)
  • mice
  • Fleming operates its own Animal House, which can house up to 20,000 mice and has its own complete mouse histopathology unit. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Animal House has a capacity to house more than 20,000 mice and is currently the largest Mouse Unit in Greece in terms of number and variety of mice. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1902 Lucien Cuénot published the results of his experiments using mice which showed that Mendel's laws of inheritance were also valid for animals - results that were soon confirmed and extended to other species. (wikipedia.org)
  • Rodents are commonly used in animal testing, particularly mice and rats, but also guinea pigs, hamsters, gerbils and others. (wikipedia.org)
  • While mice, rats and other rodents are by far the most widely used animals in biomedical research, recent studies have highlighted their limitations. (wikipedia.org)
  • Regarding experiments on mice in particular, some researchers have complained that "years and billions of dollars have been wasted following false leads" as a result of a preoccupation with the use of these animals in studies. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many laboratory animals, including mice and rats, are chronically stressed which can also negatively affect research outcomes and the ability to accurately extrapolate findings to humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • The majority of research involving genetically modified mammals involves mice with attempts to produce knockout animals in other mammalian species limited by the inability to derive and stably culture embryonic stem cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Genetically modified mice are often used to study cellular and tissue-specific responses to disease (cf knockout mouse). (wikipedia.org)
  • gene
  • Strategies directed against the huntingtin gene in the brain are an important part of CHDI's therapeutic portfolio", says David Howland, PhD, Director of Model Systems at CHDI. (medindia.net)
  • In 1991, it was recognized that the AR gene is involved in the disease process. (wikipedia.org)
  • molecular
  • Rotors are still the most frequent chemical models for allosteric effects, and are present in many of the molecular machines pursued in other laboratories today. (wikipedia.org)
  • They include text mining, information management, sequence analysis, analysis of molecular interactions, and mathematical models that enable advanced simulations of immune system and immunological processes. (wikipedia.org)
  • researchers
  • In describing the most pertinent animal models of ophthalmic diseases, this book will be of interest to ophthalmologists, vision researchers, fellows, residents, and medical students. (springer.com)
  • The Boyd Group, a British group comprising animal researchers, philosophers, primatologists, and animal advocates, has recommended a global prohibition on the use of great apes. (wikipedia.org)
  • clinical
  • World expert clinicians discuss each model based on their clinical experience, and the text is supported by numerous photos and diagrams. (springer.com)
  • cardiac
  • In a canine model of hypothermic circulatory arrest, alpha II-spectrin breakdown products have shown to be relevant markers of neurologic injury post-cardiac surgery. (wikipedia.org)
  • fungi
  • Its diverse diet includes plants, fungi, and a variety of animals. (wikipedia.org)
  • The cytochrome P450 (CYP) superfamily of enzymes is distributed broadly throughout bacteria, archaea, fungi, plants, animals, and even viruses (see Cytochrome P450). (wikipedia.org)
  • Surveillance
  • The Center for Animal Disease Modeling and Surveillance (CADMS) led by Dr. Beatriz Martínez López was formally recognized by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations as an FAO Reference Center for Veterinary Epidemiology in May 2018. (ucdavis.edu)
  • treatments
  • Further understanding of the pathogenicity of autoreactive CD4 + T cells may lead to disease-specific treatments. (wiley.com)
  • vivo
  • The initial idea that stem cell transplants work in vivo via the replacement of endogenous cells lost or damaged owing to disease has been challenged by accumulating evidence of their therapeutic plasticity. (wingsforlife.com)
  • widely
  • Versions with carboxyl groups became widely used elsewhere as models for metalloenzymes (the XDK structures) and in Rebek's laboratory to probe stereoelectronic effects. (wikipedia.org)
  • commonly
  • Kindling is a commonly used model for the development of seizures and epilepsy in which the duration and behavioral involvement of induced seizures increases after seizures are induced repeatedly. (wikipedia.org)
  • species
  • This meeting is unique in that our program is not limited to a sin-gle disease, discipline, or species, and thereby will provide a breadth and diversity of topics not seen in more narrowly focused conferences. (xenbase.org)
  • approaches
  • Animal based approaches to phenotypic screening are not as amenable to screening libraries containing thousands of small molecules. (wikipedia.org)
  • experiments
  • In December 2005, Austria outlawed experiments on any apes, unless it is conducted in the interests of the individual animal. (wikipedia.org)