• analgesia
  • Despite the potential for renal impairment when used at anesthetic doses, no significant adverse effects have been reported in the literature when it is used at the lower doses (up to 6 milliliters) used for producing analgesia and sedation. (wikipedia.org)
  • patients
  • Patients who have not responded to standard therapies have been quickly revived by administration of intravenous lipids. (aacn.org)
  • Patients typically wake within minutes of an anesthetic being terminated and regain their senses within hours. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some patients undergo sedation for smaller procedures such as biopsies and colonoscopies and are told they will be asleep, although in fact they are getting a sedation that may allow some level of awareness as opposed to a general anesthetic. (wikipedia.org)
  • The anesthetic can quickly put patients to sleep for a short period of time to relieve the discomfort of surgery or other medical procedures, or to allow physicians to administer longer lasting, inhalable anesthetics. (wikipedia.org)
  • Attempts have been made to develop eugenol derivatives as intravenous anesthetics, as an alternative to propanidid which produces unacceptable side effects around the site of injection in many patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • agent
  • It was developed at Janssen Pharmaceutica in 1964 and was introduced as an intravenous agent in 1972 in Europe and in 1983 in the United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • Halothane is another halogenated hydrocarbon anesthetic agent which was introduced into clinical practice in 1956. (wikipedia.org)
  • Methoxyflurane is an extremely potent and highly lipid-soluble anesthetic agent, characterized by very slow induction (onset of action) and emergence (offset or dissipation) times. (wikipedia.org)
  • With a minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of 0.16%, methoxyflurane is an extremely potent anesthetic agent. (wikipedia.org)
  • It has been researched for use as an intravenous anesthetic agent, with positive results in initial trials, although negative side effects like hypotension and tachycardia, as well as unpredictable pharmacokinetics at higher doses, have meant it has ultimately not been adopted for medical use. (wikipedia.org)
  • injection
  • citation needed] Following intravenous injection, the drug rapidly reaches the brain and causes unconsciousness within 30-45 seconds. (wikipedia.org)
  • During surgeries in and around the eye, such as corneal transplant surgery, the patient often requires injection of a local anesthetic into the eye. (wikipedia.org)
  • widely
  • However, intravenous lipids are relatively safe, widely available, and easy to administer, and many published case reports document their dramatic effectiveness. (aacn.org)
  • drugs
  • Lipid emulsion therapy has also been used successfully to treat cardiac arrest and intractable arrhythmias caused by overdoses of antiepileptic drugs, cardiovascular drugs, and psychotropic medications, but experience with intravenous lipids as antidotal therapy in these clinical situations is limited. (aacn.org)
  • without this, they can move and the anesthesiologists are alerted and provide more anesthetic drugs to render the patient unconscious again. (wikipedia.org)
  • Administration
  • As the only adrenal steroidogenesis inhibitor available for intravenous or parenteral administration, it is useful in situations in which rapid control of hypercortisolism is necessary or in which oral administration is unfeasible. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the brain, etoxadrol slows down the synthesis of serotonin to 50-60% of control rates and speeds up the rate of dopamine synthesis by up to 200% of the normal rate 4-6 hours after intravenous administration. (wikipedia.org)
  • Intravenous administration is the most reliable and rapid way to accomplish euthanasia. (wikipedia.org)
  • PMID 11606122 Rigby-Jones AE, Sneyd JR, Vijn P, Boen P, Cross M. First administration to man of Org 25435, an intravenous anaesthetic: A Phase 1 Clinical Trial. (wikipedia.org)
  • dose
  • Study Design: Sequential study of an intravenous anaesthetic in young healthy males, at up to eight dose levels. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • It can occur either because of failure to deliver sufficient anesthetic medication to the patient's body, or because of individual patient factors that mean the patient is resistant to what would normally be an adequate dose of anesthetic medication. (wikipedia.org)
  • ester
  • They have a slower onset and longer half-life than ester anesthetics, and are usually racemic mixtures, with the exception of levobupivacaine (which is S(-) -bupivacaine) and ropivacaine (S(-)-ropivacaine). (wikipedia.org)