• neuraxial anesthesia
  • Epidural hematomas may occur spontaneously in the population as a whole, without epidural vessel trauma, without neuraxial anesthesia, and without coexisting coagulopathy or therapeutic anticoagulation. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • Contribuție la tratamentul infecției puerperale (1923) Abces apendicular la stînga (1927) L'Anesthésie locale continue prolongée en obstétrique (1931) Considerații asupra durerii în obstetrică (1932) Recherches sur les glandes endocrines pendent la vie intrautérine chez l'homme (collaborator, 1939) Ginecologia (coordinator, 1959) Obstetrică și ginecologie (coordinator, 1971) La tuberculose génitale de la femme (collaborator, 1971) History of neuraxial anesthesia Collis, Rachel E. (wikipedia.org)
  • The history of neuraxial anesthesia goes back to 1885. (wikipedia.org)
  • endotracheal intubation
  • For this reason, the investigators will undertaken a randomized trial comparing results of general VATS operations under NTEA versus those of a control group operated under general anesthesia with double-lumen endotracheal intubation. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Such conditions occur while undergoing anesthesia with endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation or in patients in the Trendelenburg position, In 1935, Karl Matthes (German physician 1905-1962) developed the first 2-wavelength ear O2 saturation meter with red and green filters (later switched to red and infrared filters). (wikipedia.org)
  • needle
  • An attachment for a loss of resistance syringe of the type used for inserting a epidural needle into the epidural space of a patient for administration of anesthesia includes an elastomeric band attached between diametrically opposed points of a ring dimensioned to slide onto the barrel and be retained. (google.com)
  • However, in the inadvertent case dural perforation, the incidence of headache can be lowered by identifying the epidural space with the needle bevel oriented parallel to the longitudinal dural fibers which limits the size of the subsequent dural tear. (wikipedia.org)
  • Types of epidural needles include: The Crawford Needle The Tuohy Needle The Hustead Needle The Weiss Needle The Sprotte Spezial Needle Other Epidural Needles : Other less popular types are the Wagner needle (1957), the Cheng needle(1958), the Crawley needle (1968), the Foldes needle (1973), and the Bell needle (1975)-all variants of the Huber design with a blunted tip of varying sharpness. (wikipedia.org)
  • and the Eldor needle (1993), designed for use with combined spinal epidural anesthesia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dogliotti is known for describing a "loss-of-resistance" technique, involving constant application of pressure to the plunger of a syringe to identify the epidural space whilst advancing the Tuohy needle - a technique sometimes referred to as Dogliotti's principle. (wikipedia.org)
  • This approach can also prevent PDPH headaches caused by over-penetration during epidural anesthesia (where dural puncture was never intended), since withdrawal of the needle allows the dural puncture to self-close. (wikipedia.org)
  • hematoma
  • The hypercoagulable state of the pregnant woman together with the rapid dispersal of blood out of the epidural space may protect against hematoma, despite engorgement and fragility of the epidural vessels in these patients. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • Thromboelastography (TEG) can be used to evaluate overall coagulation function, but its ability to reduce risk of epidural hematoma has not been proven. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • space
  • The epidural space is a potential space occupied by fatty tissue, blood vessels and lymphatics. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • It is used by injecting it into the area, around a nerve that supplies the area, or into the spinal canal's epidural space. (wikipedia.org)
  • As a less common mode of MUA treatment, select injectable medications can be administered directly to affected synovial joints, spinal facet joints or into the surrounding epidural space. (wikipedia.org)
  • Based on Corning's own description of his experiments, it is apparent that his injections were made into the epidural space, and not the subarachnoid space. (wikipedia.org)
  • Anaesthesia
  • In the practice of medicine (especially surgery and dentistry), anesthesia or anaesthesia is a state of temporary induced loss of sensation or awareness. (wikipedia.org)
  • Three broad categories of anaesthesia exist: General anesthesia suppresses central nervous system activity and results in unconsciousness and total lack of sensation. (wikipedia.org)
  • A patient under regional or local anesthesia remains conscious, unless general anaesthesia or sedation is administered at the same time. (wikipedia.org)
  • Examples include epidural anaesthesia and spinal anaesthesia. (wikipedia.org)
  • This technique has some similarity to epidural anaesthesia, and lay people often confuse the two techniques. (wikipedia.org)
  • injections
  • In the early 1980s, several cases were reported of neurological deficits after inadvertent intrathecal injections intended for epidural delivery. (wikipedia.org)
  • local
  • it is fine for epidural patients if the epidural is just a type of local (marcaine. (allnurses.com)
  • Regional anesthesia and local anesthesia, which block transmission of nerve impulses between a targeted part of the body and the central nervous system, causing loss of sensation in the targeted body part. (wikipedia.org)
  • The first two types are usually done under local or epidural anesthesia, and take about 30 minutes to perform. (wikipedia.org)
  • The epidural route is frequently employed by certain physicians and nurse anaesthetists to administer diagnostic (e.g. radiocontrast agents) and therapeutic (e.g., glucocorticoids) chemical substances, as well as certain analgesic and local anaesthetic agents. (wikipedia.org)
  • surgery
  • Epidural anesthesia is medicine used to numb you so you do not feel pain during surgery. (drugs.com)
  • Indications for epidural anesthesia (EA) in the ICU include blunt trauma with or without rib fractures, thoracic, abdominal, orthopedic and vascular surgery, as well as nonsurgical problems such as intractable angina pectoris and acute pancreatitis. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • General double-lumen endotracheal intubated anesthesia with one-lung ventilation, has been accepted mandatory for Video-Assisted Thoracic Surgery (VATS) although several adverse effects can derive from this type of anesthesia like intubation-related throat injury, ventilator-induced lung injury, arrhythmia and so on. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • On August 16, 1898, German surgeon August Bier (1861-1949) performed surgery under spinal anesthesia in Kiel. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1921, Spanish military surgeon Fidel Pagés (1886-1923) developed the modern technique of lumbar epidural anesthesia, which was popularized in the 1930s by Italian surgery professor Achille Mario Dogliotti (1897-1966). (wikipedia.org)
  • incidence
  • A recent meta-analysis of 4 studies post-1990 which involved more than 1 million obstetric patients found an incidence of 1 in 168,000, but with only 6 epidural hematomas the accuracy of this estimate cannot be relied upon. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • enables
  • Anesthesia enables the painless performance of medical procedures that would cause severe or intolerable pain to an unanesthetized patient. (wikipedia.org)
  • hospital
  • Recent findings suggest that epidural use can go a long way beyond labor pain relief: According to scientists from Magee Women's Hospital in Pittsburgh, epidural anesthesia may also reduce your long-term risk of developing postpartum depression. (fitpregnancy.com)
  • characteristics
  • Procaine Tetracaine Drug bank entry for Chloroprocaine Ampres (chloroprocaine) Summary of Product Characteristics, Palas T, Cloroprocaina in chirurgia ambulatoriale: uno studio osservazionale, Perimed 2009, 3(2):31-34 Drasner K. Chloroprocaine spinal anesthesia: back to the future? (wikipedia.org)
  • block
  • The lowest platelet count that an anesthesia provider will consider before placing a neuraxial block depends partly on the comfort level of the provider and partly on the risk/benefit ratio to the patient. (clinicaladvisor.com)